Tag: career

Building A Successful Summer Youth Programs Team

SYP SnowmanWith summer just around the corner (or should I say somewhere around the snowbank!), the time has come for us to hold interviews and begin filling the 65+ roles that it takes to make SYP a great experience. Each year, we hire a large seasonal staff for a wide variety of roles from live-in counselor to bus chaperones. This team, many of whom are current Michigan Tech students, always bring their own life experiences, fresh perspectives, and what we call a #BeAwesome attitude to the program—each summer is unique!

So, how do we build a successful team?  
With over 1,000 participants attending our summer programs, we rely on the staff in many ways and they need to be prepared for anything! The good news is, a lot of our staff already know so much before they even apply. With over 700 SYP alumni now attending Michigan Tech, it’s no surprise when many of them want to come back to the program to work as a counselor. They looked up to past SYP counselors for guidance and saw them as positive role models—now they want to give back. These program alumni, along with our dedicated returning staff, are excited to recreate the positive and inviting environment they experienced with SYP and become leaders for new staff members.

Training, Training, Training!
Once our team is selected, the real fun begins! Before any participants arrive on campus, our full team goes through extensive training both in-person, online, and through independent reading. We utilize Expert Online Training sessions that include educational videos and quizzes to prepare staff about problem solving, bullies, becoming a youth development professional, cultivating patience, listening, safe talk and safe touch, helping students fit in, supervising, and more.

All staff then attend a week-long training the week before programs begin that covers: CPR/First Aid training, van certification, background checks, building security, fire drills, mandated reporter training, Title IX training, case studies, student/staff rules and expectations, inclusion conversations, and much more. Even after this week is over, the training never really ends. The best counselors know that they are always learning and growing as they meet new participants each week. Some even say they don’t want it to end.

“THE BEST JOB EVER. The best hours, the best coworkers, and the best professional staff. Everything about this job is great. We heard about the student who wrote for the story contest and she stated, ‘My only regret is not being able to do it again next summer,’ and that is so applicable to me as an employee. I had so much fun with the students and hearing about all of their projects, that the only sad part would be if I am only able to get this opportunity once. Hopefully I can be back at it next summer!”
– Sarah, 2018 SYP staff 

It doesn’t get much better.
As a professional staff, we are so grateful to the incredible student staff who are the heart and soul of SYP—especially to our returners and head staff, some of whom have dedicated three, four, or even more summers to inspiring young people. We come back year after year, too, because as it turns out, we love this opportunity just as much as our students do. It’s so much more than a camp or class-it’s an experience. And for many, it’s life changing. Watching it all unfold; the friendships, the lessons learned, and the discovery of a career path they are passionate about, is what makes each year of planning all worth it.

Michigan Technological University is an Equal Opportunity Educational Institution/Equal Opportunity Employer, which includes providing equal opportunity for protected veterans and individuals with disabilities.


Hemlock Semiconductor Scholarships for Engineering Scholars Program

We are pleased to announce that Hemlock Semiconductor Corporation (HSC) will once again be sponsoring 30 scholarships aimed at Michigan high schoolers from Midland, Saginaw, and Bay counties who have expressed an interest in STEM education (science, technology, engineering, and math) or have demonstrated scholastic success in those subjects.

2018 recipients of the award during a reception at HSC.
2018 recipients of the award during a reception at HSC.

Students must apply and be selected competitively; selected students will receive a scholarship valued at $1000 to cover the tuition, boarding, and transportation to attend the Engineering Scholars Program at Michigan Technological University. ESP is hosted every year by Michigan Tech Summer Youth Programs; this year, it will be offered during the week of July 21–27, 2019. Throughout the week, students are exposed to 10+ types of engineering through group projects, engineering sessions, creative problem-solving activities, and special topic sessions.

Interested applicants should consider the following:

  • This award is for students who attend a school located in Midland, Bay, or Saginaw counties.
  • Eleventh grade students will be given first priority; high-performing ninth and tenth graders may also be considered.
  • All students should have an interest in STEM education or careers, and have demonstrated scholastic success in these subjects.
  • Michigan Technological University will review applications and select scholarship recipients based on merit.
  • At least one award will be guaranteed per school with applicants; more than one from a given school will be considered if additional spots remain.

Sound like you or someone you know? The overview and application contain many more details. You can also get more information about ESP by visiting the Competitive Scholarship Programs page of the SYP website and clicking on “Engineering Scholars Program.”

Questions about this award are welcome at the Summer Youth Programs office at 906-487-2219 or esp@mtu.edu.


Words of Wisdom from a WIE Alumna

We recently received a surprise message from a Women in Engineering (WIE) alumna, Margaret O’Neil, who attended one of our first years of this program. In her message, she recalled coming to the program at a young age and how it solidified her decision to become an automotive engineer. We just had to know more about her career and life; here is more of her story.

WIE Alumna, Margaret O’Neill

Question: Where are you from? How far did you have to travel to attend WIE?

Answer: At the time I traveled from Bloomfield Hills, Michigan (which is near Detroit) to attend the camp.  

Q: You said in your email that WIE solidified your decision to pursue automotive engineering. What do you remember from that week?

A: I remember being excited about being able to test and feel materials, the hands-on aspects to working with things and beginning to understand how they work—Playing around with the pieces and learning as I went.

I always liked playing around and learning how things worked, and I was good at it. Growing up, I was the youngest of seven kids, with my older siblings mostly moved out of the house. So if things broke or didn’t work in the house, I ended up being the one to fix it. Not sure how I figured it out, but I even fixed the lawn mower once. I attribute my path to the WIE program, as it was my real first chance to try engineering out.  

Q: What about automotive engineering hooked you? What do you love most about your field?

A: When I first went to Marquette University [in Milwaukee, WI], it was to become biomedical engineer— I wanted to work with ergonomics.  I wasn’t good at 3D side of it, but electronics I understood, like how things moved and flowed.

For example: when looking at a car, I explained it just like a big body. Being able to see electrons and how they move and systems go together was the best thing about going into automotive.  

Q: Did you take any special classes or steps in high school to prepare?

A: I did, I took five semesters of biology, chemistry class, and all the math I could, except for calculus (not sure why!). I remember I didn’t need that many credits my senior year and had a job doing cancer research at Marygrove College for a few hours a day.

I also worked at a gas station pumping gas and had a job parking cars. Whatever there was to do with cars, I guess I was there.

Q: Do you have any role models or mentors?

A: I struggle to find one in my life, but perhaps my mother. She ran the household while my father worked at Ford Motor Company and she kept us all going. Also my brother, as he always had a car in the driveway and was rebuilding them and let me watch. When I graduated, only 4 out of 186 girls in my high school class were planning to go into engineering. Now, I do a lot of speaking about females and non traditional careers and encouraging them into automotive in career tech and other schools.

Q: What surprised you the most about about your field and career over the years?

A: I rolled well with the technology changes over the years, and even started my own computer company building hardware, software and networks. I basically design projects and others execute them.  I also have completed lots of training over the years.

Q: Any other words of wisdom you want shared with future engineers?

A: Don’t go into something just for money, or prestige: really see yourself doing it for 50 years. If you have fun when working, it won’t seem like a job. That’s why I haven’t retired!