Tag: events

Jacek Borysow Wins 2024 Bayard Rustin Award

A student hands Jacek Borysow the Bayard Rustin award near a podium.
Jacek Borysow receiving Bayard Rustin award from Jaylen Body (NSBE)

Jacek Borysow, interim physics department chair and professor, has been named the 2024 winner of the Bayard Rustin Award. The National Society of Black Engineers presents this prestigious to faculty or staff who make important behind-the-scenes impacts on campus, especially for underrepresented groups.

“Thank you to the National Society of Black Engineers for this award. Truly, it is the most important award I have ever received. It was given to me by the students and it is named after one of the most outstanding African-American leaders in the movement for nonviolence and civil rights,” said Borysow.

Christopher Sanders Wins 2023 Bayard Rustin Award

Christopher Sanders smiles and stands in front of a microphone.

The National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) named Christopher Sanders the winner of the 2023 Bayard Rustin Award during the 34th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Banquet on January 16. This award, now in its fourth year, recognizes a faculty or staff member at Michigan Tech for their behind-the-scenes impact.

Sanders is the advisor for NSBE as well as the assistant director of the Center for Diversity and Inclusion.

“I am honored and humbled to receive the Bayard Rustin Award from NSBE. Since starting at MTU, our community—and especially our students—have gone out of their way to ensure I feel welcome on campus,” said Sanders.

What is Juneteenth?

The summer season in the US includes several holidays celebrated widely across the nation—Memorial Day, Father’s Day, Independence Day, and Labor Day. But do you observe Juneteenth? Have you heard of this day, short for June 19?

Current American history textbooks proclaim Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863, as the end of slavery. Truth be told, slavery remained relatively unaffected in many places, most prominently in Texas. It was status quo for slaves well beyond the Proclamation date—they carried on with their lives of bondage and subjugation oblivious to the fact they were legally free. It was nearly two and a half years later, on June 19, 1865, when federal troops arrived in Galveston, Texas, with the news that the Civil War had ended, slavery was abolished, and enslaved people were now free.