Category Archives: CCM – News

Inauguration Day Talk to Focus on US-Russia Relations

As Donald J. Trump is poised to become the 45th President of the United States Friday, questions about the future of relations between the United States and Russia abound.

The Social Science Speaker Series presents “From Russia, with What? Thoughts on the Future of US-Russia Relations,” by Roman Sidortsov (SS) at 4 p.m. tomorrow (Jan. 20) in the Memorial Union Alumni Lounge B.

Green Film Series Tonight 1-19

Michigan Tech’s Seventh Annual Green Film Series continues tonight a showing and discussion of the films “After Coal” and “Half Life.” “After Coal,” (60 min.) profiles individuals building a new future in the coalfields of central Appalachia and Wales. Welsh coalfields were shut down in the 1980s, eliminating more than 20,000 jobs while Appalachian coalfields lost more than 20,000 mining jobs from 1994-20014. Both regions have survived disasters associated with mining production & waste disposal, and each has explored strategies for remembering the past while looking to the future. “Half Life: America’s Last Uranium Mill,” (12 min.), describes the Ute tribe’s concern that toxic and radioactive contamination from the White Mesa Mill in SE Utah threatens their water supply and life.

The films begin at 7 p.m. with a discussion facilitated by Roman Sidortsov (SS) to follow. Coffee and dessert will be served. There is no admission but a $3 donation is suggested.


Write a Cover Letter that Gets Attention

Check out this Career Services tutorial!

Only three percent of applicants personalize and tailor their cover letter to the job they’re applying for, and it’s that three percent that end up in the “yes” pile. Write a cover letter that makes you stand out from the hundreds of other applicants. This session will be offered twice, from 12:10 to 12:50 p.m. tomorrow (Dec. 6) and Wednesday (Dec. 7) in Administration Building Room 220 – Career Services.


Dr. Margaret Noodin on indigenous language

Social Justice Lecture – Dr. Margaret Noodin

Location: Great Lakes Research Center: 202 (Lobby & Room)

Time: Reception will start at 5pm followed by the presentation at 5:30pm

Dr. Noodin will present on indigenous language, Native student resources, and readings from her book Weweni.  Dr. Noodin has a Ph.D. in Literature and Linguistics. She is also an Assistant Professor of English and American Indian Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. This lecture is sponsored by the Center for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Social Justice Lecture Series: Margaret Noodin

Social Justice Lecture Series: Margaret Noodin

The Social Justice Lecture Series welcomes Margaret Noodin to the Great Lakes Research Center.

Join the Center for Diversity and Inclusion and Noodin for a lecture about Native American culture, native students on our campus, and Noodin’s work.

Noodin has a Ph.D. in Literature and Linguistics. She is also an Assistant Professor of English and American Indian Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. All are welcome to this free event.

There will be a reception at 5 p.m. with the lecture starting at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 17 in GLRC Room 202.

Sponsored by the Center for Diversity and Inclusion.


He Named me Mahala – free screening

MahalaIn recognition of International Education Week, Michigan Tech is screening the critically acclaimed documentary, He Named me Malala, at 5:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 11 in Fisher 135. A reflection discussion will follow the film. Admission is free.

The film is an intimate portrait of Nobel Peace Prize Laureate , who was targeted by the Taliban and severely wounded by a gunshot when returning home on her school bus in Pakistan’s Swat Valley. She miraculously survived and is now a leading campaigner for girls’ education globally as co-founder of the Malala Fund.

The event is sponsored by Michigan Tech Provost Office, International Programs and Services and Michigan Tech Film Board.



41 North starts Nov. 2

Screen Shot 2016-10-06 at 1.29.42 PMFrom a family’s unique intervention into the silent world of autism to six intrepid young entrepreneurs building startups in Detroit, the 41 North Film Festival offers human stories that engage, inform, inspire and uplift.

Over the course of four days, the festival features more than 20 acclaimed films from around the world, as well as music, prizes and other special events.

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Ron Suskind and Academy Award-winning director Roger Ross Williams will be in attendance for the screening of “Life, Animated,” the documentary based on Suskind’s best-selling memoir “Life, Animated: A Story of Sidekicks, Heroes, and Autism.”

Award-winning editor, and Michigan native, Jason Zeldes will present his directorial debut film, “Romeo Is Bleeding.”

Detroit Free Press Executive Video Producer Brian Kaufman will be joined by Rolf Peterson (SFRES) and John Vucetich (SFRES) for a panel discussion following the screening of his film “Predator/Prey: The Fight for Isle Royale Wolves“.

Among other feature films included this year are “All These Sleepless Nights,” (Marczak, 2016), “Operator” (Kibens, 2016), “Kedi” (Torun, 2016), “Do Not Resist” (Atkinson, 2016), “Death by Design” (Williams, 2016), “A Stray” (Syeed, 2016) and “Sonita” (Maghami, 2016), which won both the 2016 Sundance Audience and Grand Jury prizes for World Cinema Documentary.

Now in its 12th year, the festival continues to be free and open to the public. Major Sponsors include the Humanities department, the Visual and Performing Arts department, the Rozsa Center for the Performing Arts, Student Affairs and Advancement, Pavlis Honors College, the Visiting Women & Minority Lecturer/Scholar Series and the Parents Fund of the Michigan Tech Fund.

Learn more about the films, events, sponsors and how to reserve your ticket online. For more information email 41north@mtu.edu.

(by Erin Smith. This article originally appeared in TechToday.)


Artist Sarah Hewitt: special lecture today!

Guest artist Sarah Hewitt, will give a special lecture,  The Rise of the Feminine: SHE VOWS, tonight at 5:00pm in the Rozsa lower level. Hewitt’s exhibit, “Flats and Rounds,” is on display in the Rozsa A-Space Gallery through Nov. 18. In this lecture (free and open to the public), Hewitt will talk about her work and her influences, her use of unusual materials, and how weaving is connected to past and future traditions. This lecture is presented as part of the VanEvera Distinguished Lecture Series.hewitt

Sarah Hewitt lives between New York and Maine. Her work has been exhibited throughout the country. Recent exhibitions include Kindred Beasts at the Everson Museum, and Accidents into Incidents at Momenta Art. Hewitt has received awards and residencies from the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Vermont Studio Center, Purchase College/SUNY, Quimby Colony and Haystack Mountain School of Crafts. She was recently nominated for a Joan Mitchell Painters and Sculptors Grant.


Book on Vonnegut Brothers Discussed at Remote Sensing Seminar

Noted Author Ginger Strand will speak at the Remote Sensing Seminar, slated for 4 p.m. Monday (Oct. 17) in Dow 642.

Strand will discuss her book “The Brothers Vonnegut,” which tells the unbelievable story of GE’s Covonld War project to take control of the weather, and how it shaped a young aspiring writer named Kurt Vonnegut.

Set at the dawn of the computer era, in a nation beset by atomic anxiety, the story of Kurt and his scientist brother Bernard demonstrates the powerful connections between science and art.

Strand will discuss Nobel Laureate Irving Langmuir’s unresolved meteorological experiments, Bernard Vonnegut’s misgivings about them and Kurt Vonnegut’s use of all of it to write some of the most inventive novels about science ever produced—books that raise questions about scientific ethics that remain just as pressing today.

A book signing and reception will follow the talk. Books will be available for purchase at the signing and at the campus bookstore. This special event is co-sponsored/funded by the Visiting Women and Minority Lecturer/Scholar Series (VWMLSS) which is funded by a grant to the Office of Institutional Equity and Inclusion from the State of Michigan’s King-Chavez-Parks Initiative and EPSSI (The Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences Institute). It is also sponsored by EPSSI and the Departments of Humanities and Social Sciences.