From Intern to Full-time Position

Matthew Rudy is off to ITC Holdings after graduation to pursue a full-time position!

Matthew had an internship in the planning department for ITC this past summer. He was the first intern the economic planning group ever hired, and Matthew’s skills and motivation exceeded his supervisor’s expectations. At the end of his internship, Matthew was offered a full-time position starting after graduation.Matthew’s advice to other students is to network, network, network! He advises students to, “Go out and meet with as many recruiters as you can. Start networking companies early. They will remember you throughout your time at Michigan Tech.”

“Go to industry days, go to Career Fair, go to as many events as possible. By going to these events, you will meet  recruiters that will know you by name.”

Matthew is an Electrical Engineering student at Michigan Tech.
Written by Morgan Laajala, Communications Intern, Career Services 

A Casual Conversation: How Allison got her Co-op at Kimberly-Clark

Kimberly Clark“Network with company reps as much as possible. Having that personal connection with someone… is very helpful on the job hunt.” -Allison Dorn, Mechanical Engineering Student at Michigan Tech.

Allison already had an internship lined up  for Summer 2017, but she still wanted to attend the Spring 2017 Career Fair. She went with no expectations and received a co-op offer for Spring 2018- one year away.

Allison knows it’s important to stay relevant, so she attends career events like industry days, employer info sessions, resume blitz, mock interviews, and the Career Fair cookout. Her goal is to brush up on her interview skills and distribute her resume.

Allison became interested in Kimberly-Clark when they hosted an event with the Society of Women Engineers.

At Career Fair, she noticed there were no students lined up at Kimberly-Clark.  She went to talk to them on a whim. Knowing she had her internship coming up, she wasn’t looking for anything but a conversation. After a great conversation with a  KC rep, they wanted to interview her for a Spring 2018 co-op. Allison scheduled her interview for the following day and received an offer two days after Career Fair.

Allison advises other students to “network before career fair, during different company info sessions and at Career Services’ events- so that when you get to career fair you already have established relationships.”

Allison also advises students to always be prepared. She says, “The two weeks before career fair, you should have resumes on you at all times! You never know when you will have a chance to give it to a company rep!”

Written by Morgan Laajala, Communications Intern, Career Services


A Clear Career Path: How Sooraj got his Full-time Job

Sooraj Rehan Sooraj Rehan_cropis a mechanical engineer heading to Cummins, Inc. to pursue a full-time position.

Sooraj created a clear career path for himself to find success. Sooraj focused on the kind of career he wanted and the companies he was interested in working for. He chose relevant classes and coursework, worked hard to get good grades, and completed an internship.  Sooraj applied for hundreds of jobs before landing an offer from Cummins, Inc.

Part of Sooraj’s personal career journey was to take advantage of CareerFEST resources at Michigan Tech. Sooraj attended employer meet and greets, a mock interview, and an advising appointment.

Sooraj’s advice to other students is, “Have a clear goal and do not be distracted by anything else. Hard work is life.”

Written by Morgan Laajala, Communications Intern, Career Services


Be Yourself: How a Math and Psych Major Landed her Co-op

Rylee Price_cropRylee Price is heading to Greenheck for a Production Supervisor co-op this spring. She went to Career Fair with one goal: to prove that her mathematics and psychology majors are useful to recruiting companies.

Rylee scheduled an interview with Greenheck and attended their Co-op Day. She interviewed with five different recruiters who were looking to hire co-ops. Riley used Co-op Day to network, show off her skill set, and ask questions about available positions.

Rylee’s advice for other students is to be yourself! She says, “Be confident in who you are and your capabilities. Be willing to learn, accept challenges, and make mistakes. Don’t fear rejection, and be ready to put yourself out there. The greatest advice I could give is to know how to market yourself!”

 

Written by Communications Intern- Morgan Laajala. 


Making Connections: How Sachin Landed a Full-time Job at Cloudflare

Written by Morgan Laajala, Communications Intern at Career Services

 

Sachin Fernandes, a Michigan Tech Alumni '17 with a degree in Computer Engineering, working at Cloudflare.
Sachin Fernandes, a Michigan Tech Alumni ’17 with a degree in Computer Engineering, working at Cloudflare.

It was a LinkedIn post and following his gut that inspired Sachin to look at available jobs at Cloudflare,  a company with services he’d used,  good principles he recognized and cutting edge technology.   He looked into different  positions to better understand the type of technology talent they were looking for, and he decided to “give it a shot.”

After doing his research, Sachin emailed an engineering manager at Cloudflare named Tony.  Tony had a similar technology  profile and seemed excited to connect with Sachin.

Sachin shared his relevant engineering experience with Tony and inquired about an available internship at Cloudflare. Sachin was disappointed and discouraged when he found out that someone else was hired for the internship. However,  Kirsti, a Career Services Advisor at Michigan Tech, helped Sachin  keep his spirits up and encouraged him not to give up.

Sachin sent monthly emails to Tony about his current projects and reached out to other employees at the company. He says, “Never be scared to email or text someone, it always pays off.” Sachin was later recommended for an internship by Tony and other connections he’d made at Cloudflare.

Over the course of a few weeks, Sachin had multiple phone interviews and was invited to their San Francisco office to interview. To prepare for his interviews, Sachin reviewed Cloudflare’s open source projects to understand the company’s process of writing and building software.

Sachin interviewed at Cloudflare on October 31, 2016, and felt an immediate connection with the company.  He was amazed by the facility and knew that he wanted to work there. After returning to Michigan Tech, Cloudflare had Sachin complete a final interview with a senior engineer. The interview was a  two-way conversation that made Sachin feel comfortable and allowed him to ask questions and solve problems provided by the interviewer.

A few days later, Sachin accepted an internship offer that turned into a full-time position. Sachin’s tip for students is to always send a thank you note to everyone who interviews them and helps them during the process.


How I Found my Job at the Utah Festival Opera

Written by Morgan Laajala, Communications Intern at Career Services

Aaron Christianson first applied to work at the Musical Theatre of Wichita, but he didn’t have a well-written cover letter. His resume never made it to the boss.

After working with a faculty member at Michigan Tech, Aaron re-wrote his cover letter and sent out eight applications to different companies – within two days he had multiple responses.

He sent out his applications on Friday, had two scheduled interviews on Saturday, and two job offers the following Thursday. Aaron credits this success to his updated cover letter. During his interview with the Utah Festival Opera, Aaron had an immediate connection with the Technical Director, the Upper Peninsula. The director’s son was attending Lake Superior State University, which Michigan Tech had just “proudly destroyed in hockey,” as Aaron put it. Ultimately, Aaron chose to take the position with the Utah Festival Opera.

Aaron’s advice to other students is, “Don’t sell yourself short. Tech is an amazing school that gives students skills most other universities ignore, and that makes us very valuable as employees and leaders.”

Aaron is a Theatre & Entertainment Technology student at Michigan Technological University.

Aaron is a Theatre & Entertainment Technology student at Michigan Technological University.
Aaron working at his summer 2017 internship at the Utah Festival Opera in Logan, Utah.

Ask an MTU Career Advisor: What should I do? I accepted a Job Offer but another Company wants an Interview.

Dear MTU Career Advisor,

I accepted a full-time job over spring break (that does not really interest me), and now have another interview with a company I am extremely interested in. I need advice on what information I should share in my upcoming interview as well as what I would do if I got another offer. There are many circumstances that I need to consider in this situation and need professional advice.

Not One, but Two

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Dear Not One, but Two:

Congratulations! Your efforts have been recognized by not one, but two employers! This is both exciting and stressful, right? RIGHT.  I’m glad you reached out to us.  Let’s call the first company…Company One, and the second…. (you may have guessed it) Company Two.

You already said “yes” to Company One and made an agreement. Even though Company Two is more appealing, I don’t recommend reneging on Company One.  It may sound old fashion, but your word is your bond. Meaning, you should always keep your promises, for a variety of reasons.

It’s a small and connected world, especially at Michigan Tech. Recruiters talk. They will and do talk to one another. Launching your professional career with a renege, may burn a professional bridge that can negatively affect your reputation.  It could also keep Company One from recruiting at Michigan Tech in the future, which ultimately impacts other Huskies.

From an employer’s perspective, recruiting is expensive. It’s a significant investment of time and money for every person that is hired into an organization. When you accepted the first position, Company One stopped looking.  You prevented others from accepting that job. When a candidate reneges, there is a real cost to starting the process over again!

Here’s what I recommend:

  • For Company Two, be transparent. Be honest and tell them you accepted another offer. Emphasize that you want to stay connected and build a rapport for future opportunities, but that you can’t, in good conscience, accept this one.  Let them know how excited you are about the company and request an “informational interview,” in place of a job interview.
  • For Company One, remind yourself of why you said “yes” in the first place! Remember your initial excitement. They selected you from a competitive candidate pool, and they are equally excited to have you on their team. You could, and probably will, totally love this job!

Lastly, you may hear advice from familiar and trusted resources (parents and friends) that might be contrary to what I am advocating. I hope you’ll consider this information in your decision.

Our doors are always open to discuss this matter in person. Again, congratulations for being THAT crazy, smart student!

Regards,

 

An MTU Career Advisor


Ask an MTU Career Advisor: When is the Best Time to Start Applying?

Hello,

I’m currently an engineering student at Michigan Tech that will graduate in December. I’m curious, when is the best time to start applying for full-time positions? I started looking at Handshake but I wasn’t sure if it was too early to apply or not.

Thanks so much!

Soon-to-be Fall Graduate

 

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Hi Soon-to-be Fall Graduate,

 

That is a great question. Some recruiters will start making offers up to 6 months in advance, while others may be looking for someone to report immediately. It’s hard to say. There’s no definitive answer.

My best advice to you is:

Get your name out there! And be honest in your timeline. State your expected graduation date -December 2017- on your resume.  Address it in your cover letter, as well. If companies like what they see, they will keep you on their radar, even if it isn’t for that specific position.

Take time to polish your application materials (resume, cover letter, LinkedIn profile, etc.). Don’t start applying until they’re flawless.

Plan to attend CareerFEST and Career Fair in September, as it is a great opportunity to meet recruiters and start the conversation. In some instances, the hiring process can take up to six months depending on the job, company, and HR policies and procedures. It doesn’t hurt to get your application materials ready, do your research, and start applying.

If you need any help with those application materials, please let us know!

Keep us posted on your progress, we are always here to help!

 

MTU Career Advisor


Conciseness in Communication is Powerful

In High School, I remember the first assignment that needed to be typed and not hand-written.  I had to get my mother to do the typing for me!  The technology of manual typewriters, ribbons, and white-out demanded a high degree of skill, manual dexterity, and practice.  Advancements in word-processors, electronics, and printers have made this a distant memory.  There is no question that documents created today are easier to read, analyze, and search.  

Videos and Infographics seem to be in a similar realm.  The software to create and edit videos has evolved to be nearly as simple as word processing.  The file sizes and amount of information processed is “orders of magnitude” larger, but the process is surprisingly simple.

The focus on being concise and efficient hasn’t changed.  

Students struggle with the idea of making a 1-page resume and a brief cover letter.  They constantly have more information to add to the single piece of paper used to summarize their life and accomplishments.  Conceptually, the focus on the audience and what is important to them is extremely difficult when you are personally invested in the topic.  

Last year, we made a decision to make short summary videos of the CareerFEST events held on campus.  Taking 6 hours of raw footage from any event and distilling into 2-minute videos doesn’t seem fair!  There were hours of planning meetings, scheduling, and logistics that went into these events.  But, when you watch the final product, the focus needs to be on the design and outcomes of the event.  The videos are available on: https://www.youtube.com/user/MTUCareer

Today’s student has grown up with access to the Internet in their hand – both literally and figuratively.  They would much rather see infographics, diagrams, and videos to describe events and complex relationships.  Why not watch the video online rather than read the book?  I have to admit, when these things are done right, I’d rather watch a video or review and infographic too!


Co-op experiences produce graduates desired by industry

Rich Wells, Vice President of Michigan Operations for Dow Chemical, walked into a room of talented students from top Universities across the U.S.. These students were working as employees at Dow’s diverse chemical production facility in Midland, Michigan. Each student’s job is not to sweep floors but to take part in a wide variety of meaningful projects that will significantly impact the company financially, while allowing each student to develop meaningful career skills.

The first question for Rich from these student co-ops was what skills did he see entry level engineers lacking? He quickly listed off five areas. 1) Decision making – being comfortable making decisions with limited data. 2) Trusting the knowledge you have gained in school and build on it. 3) Problem-solving skills that allow you to break down complex challenges and develop an array of solutions. 4) Interpersonal skills ranging from working effectively in diverse groups to constructing a clear and concise e-mail. 5) Producing results where he notes that answering e-mails does not qualify as a result. Dow Chemical structures student co-op assignments to develop and foster these skills in young engineers.

Caleb, a chemical engineering student at Michigan Tech from Leelanau, Michigan, was assigned to the pesticide production division. His process engineering duties included working with a diverse workgroup in both age and experience. Caleb’s communication strategy followed the saying “two eyes, two ears, one mouth”, meaning we were all meant to spend more time observing & listening and less time talking. Caleb learned volumes of information from his mentor Dave and the hourly operators like Scott who had been working there for over 20 years. In the process he gained their respect, allowing him to lead by influence as he successfully completed his projects.

Holly, a third-year chemical engineering student at Michigan Tech from Essexville, Michigan, was assigned the role of process safety engineer. Her job was to ensure all chemical storage and shipping containers were labeled with appropriate hazardous material signage. If these containers were involved in an accident, a labeling mistake can cost lives along with millions of dollars in fines. Holly developed the ability to build a network of ‘expert’ resources as well as a process to accomplish the task for the diverse number of chemicals and storage units.

Andrew, a third year Mechanical Engineering student at Michigan Tech from Reece, Michigan, was tasked to assess and recommend new water pumps to be purchased for the manufacturing complex. These pumps supplied water for steam generators vital for successful operations of chemical production throughout the facility. Andrew’s recommendation must satisfy needed flow rates at an acceptable cost.

Each of these students was given work meaningful to operations of one of Dow’s largest productions facilities. These students were provided mentors, needed resources, and the support of their superiors. They brought the knowledge they gained from their educational experiences, combined it with the practical knowledge they gained from their peers, and developed multidisciplinary teams to successfully solve the challenges they were assigned.

Dow Chemical’s co-op/internship program allows students to put their acquired knowledge to work in a real world setting. Caleb, Holly, and Andrew will leave this experience having not only provided Dow with valued contributions, but also having developed the skills that Rich Wells and industry covenant in their new college recruits.