Archives—November 2016

Tech Humanities Research Ranks in Top 100 NSF Grants

In the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) latest rankings of universities by total research expenditures, Michigan Tech ranked 116th in the nation among public institutions and Tech’s atmospheric science and oceanography research ranked first in Michigan.

Nationally, atmospheric science research at Michigan Tech ranked 39th in research expenditures and oceanography ranked 53rd. Environmental science also ranked 53rd.

“Michigan Tech has been growing our capabilities in environmental science through our faculty hiring processes like the strategic faculty hiring initiative, our facility development efforts like the Great Lakes Research Center and in our equipment investments such as the cloud chamber in the Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences Institute,” said Dave Reed, vice president for research. “NSF’s report reflects the impact of those investments and the significant research role that Michigan Tech is playing both nationally and within Michigan.”

The NSF report covered fiscal year 2015.

Other research areas at Tech that ranked in the top 100 nationwide include: 

  • Biomedical engineering, 96th
  • Chemical engineering, 98th
  • Civil engineering, 92nd
  • Electrical engineering, 55th
  • Mechanical engineering, 23rd
  • Materials science and engineering, 61st
  • Mathematical sciences, 75th
  • Business and management, 73rd
  • Humanities, 98th
  • Visual and performing arts, 85th

The NSF report showed that research expenditures at Michigan Tech totaled $69.6 million for fiscal year 2015.


Tech Talks, 2016

Two minutes, two slides, 13 faculty—a research showcase at (not quite) warp speed.

The Michigan Tech Research Forum is a new University presentation series showcasing the work of Michigan Tech faculty, postdocs, and researchers.

Join us from 4 to 5:30 p.m. on Thurs. Dec. 1 in MUB Ballroom B for the third Michigan Tech Research Forum of the semester and the second TechTalks session.

Thirteen researchers from across campus will present rapid-paced samplings of their work, both published and unpublished. Via warp speed talks, attendees get a quick taste of the cutting edge research and can follow up with one-on-one discussions that lead to collaborative ventures and strengthen our community.

Complimentary snacks and drinks will be provided.

Special note: On-site, low-cost childcare at the MUB is available during the TechTalks. Childcare will be available on-site for the Dec. 1 TechTalks. Pre-registration is required by Nov. 29 to ensure adequate caregivers. Complete the the registration form.

Three Humanities faculty are participating in TechTalk:

  • Andrew Fiss, Department of Humanities: “Learning from the Past: 19th Century Student Perspectives on Science Education”
  • Stefka Hristova, Department of Humanities: “Culture In-color”
  • Laura Kasson Fiss, Department of Humanities: “Clubs for the Unclubbable: Humor and Literary Sociability”

Michigan Tech Research Forum events are presented by the Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs in coordination with the Office of the Vice President of Research.

Additional TechTalks sessions are coming up in Spring 2017. Interested in nominating yourself or others? Use this online form.


Modern Languages Christmas Celebration Nov. 30

Join Modern Languages faculty and students from 5 to 6 p.m. Wednesday (Nov. 30) in Walker 134 for a unique celebration of French, German and Spanish Christmas traditions. Appearing live will be the French Canadian group, Maple Sugar Folk, as well as Christina Reyes.

Learn Christmas songs in each language for the sing-along and listen to traditional holiday music. Play Christmas Bingo and enjoy a variety of Christmas treats from different cultures. No prior language experience required. Families are welcome.

For more information, contact Karin Schlenker.


An Open Letter to the Michigan Tech Campus Community

Colleagues,

A group of faculty convened last Tuesday evening and decided we would like to make a public statement affirming our commitment to the stated values of Michigan Tech. This letter will be published in print and on-line editions of the Lode. I invite you to join us in signing the statement below.

An Open Letter to the Michigan Tech Campus Community

 

In this historical moment, we as Michigan Tech faculty want to reaffirm our commitment to the vision and mission of this University. We stand by a vision of Tech as a global institution that promotes a shared world in which justice, sustainability and prosperity are real possibilities for everyone. We find inspiration in our students and hope to inspire them in turn to create this future. We commit ourselves to addressing the challenges of our country and the world through innovative, interdisciplinary and engaged scholarship, research and educational practices that give every student and every teacher abundant opportunities to learn. In all aspects of our roles as Michigan Tech faculty, we promote mutual respect, inclusivity and dialogue and we seek to sustain a culture of collegiality, safety, support and openness across diverse perspectives, traditions and identities

Signed,

Sarah A. Green, Chemistry

Nancy Langston, Department of Social Sciences and School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science

Diane Shoos, Humanities

Patricia Sotirin, Humanities

Ann Brady, Humanities

Stephanie Carpenter, Humanities

Kelly Boyer Ontl, Social Sciences

Faith A. Morrison, Chemical Engineering

Josh Loar, Visual and Performing Arts

Noel Urban, Civil & Environmental Engineering

Susanna Peters, Social Sciences

Kathy Halvorsen, Social Sciences/School of Forest Resources and Environmental Sciences

Carol MacLennan, Social Sciences

David Watkins, Civil and Environmental Engineering

Lynn Mazzoleni, Department of Chemistry

Libby Meyer, Visual and Performing Arts

Scott Marratto, Humanities

Richelle L Winkler, Social Sciences

Claudio Mazzoleni Physics

Add your signature through this link.


Dr. Margaret Noodin on indigenous language

Social Justice Lecture – Dr. Margaret Noodin

Location: Great Lakes Research Center: 202 (Lobby & Room)

Time: Reception will start at 5pm followed by the presentation at 5:30pm

Dr. Noodin will present on indigenous language, Native student resources, and readings from her book Weweni.  Dr. Noodin has a Ph.D. in Literature and Linguistics. She is also an Assistant Professor of English and American Indian Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. This lecture is sponsored by the Center for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Johnson at

johnsonL. Syd M Johnson (HU) gave a flash talk and presented a poster on “The Catch-22 of CTE: Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues,” and presented a poster co-authored with Adam Shriver (Penn) on “Preliminary Report from the Penn Animal Research Neuroethics Workshop” at the International Neuroethics Society Annual Meeting in San Diego.


Van Kooy Two-Book Review Published

Dana VanKooy
Dana VanKooy

The BARS Review (British Association for Romantic Studies) published Dana Van Kooy’s (HU) two-book review of William Brewer’s “Staging Romantic Chameleons and Imposters (2015) and Elizabeth Maddock Dillon’s New World Drama: The Performative Commons in the Atlantic World” (2014).


Kasson Fiss Presents Paper

Laura Kasson-Fiss
Laura Kasson-Fiss

Laura Kasson Fiss (HU, Pavlis Honors College) presented a paper entitled “Clubs for the Unclubbable: Humor and Literary Sociability among Doyle, Zangwill, and Others” at the North American Victorian Studies Association conference in Phoenix, Arizona.


Social Justice Lecture Series: Margaret Noodin

Social Justice Lecture Series: Margaret Noodin

The Social Justice Lecture Series welcomes Margaret Noodin to the Great Lakes Research Center.

Join the Center for Diversity and Inclusion and Noodin for a lecture about Native American culture, native students on our campus, and Noodin’s work.

Noodin has a Ph.D. in Literature and Linguistics. She is also an Assistant Professor of English and American Indian Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. All are welcome to this free event.

There will be a reception at 5 p.m. with the lecture starting at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 17 in GLRC Room 202.

Sponsored by the Center for Diversity and Inclusion.


Fiss, Galliah, and Swartz Present Research Papers

On Nov. 3-6, Andrew Fiss (HU), Shelly Galliah (HU) and Anna Swartz (HU) presented research papers in Atlanta, Georgia, as part of the joint meetings of the Society for Literature, Science and the Arts (SLSA), the History of Science Society (HSS), and the Philosophy of Science Association (PSA).

Fiss presented as part of the panels titled “The Gendered Body: Medicine and Biology in the 19th and Early 20th Centuries” and “Performing Science,” the Womenss Caucus feature about the intersections of theater and STEM education.

Galliah presented “John Oliver’s ‘Real Climate Change Debate’: Creatively Using Comedy to Intervene on a Manufactured Scientific Controversy,” as part of a panel about “Wild Learning.”

Swartz presented “The CSI Effect: Are Jurors Starstruck by Forensic Science?” which contributed to the panel about “History, Science, and their Publics.”

This travel was partially supported by the History of Science Society and the Department of Humanities.