Archives—October 2014

Employment: Laboratory Engineer, Metallurgy & Mechanical

Job Title: Laboratory Engineer, Metallurgy & Mechanical Section
Location: Dearborn, Michigan

A Metallurgical and Materials Laboratory Engineering position at a global state of the art laboratory at Ford Motor Company providing investigation, support and analysis of automotive components, technology and processes.

Position Duties:
• Provide failure analysis and material evaluation of automotive components in support of product launches, durability concerns, and engineering.
• Prepare and evaluate ferrous and non-ferrous metallographic samples using ASTM and local procedures.
• Operate and maintain a variety of metallographic and physical testing equipment.
For example, metallographic sample preparation equipment, metallographs, microindentation hardness testers, scanning electron microscopes, Rockwell/ Brinell hardness testers, NDE equipment and tensile test machines.
• Analyze and characterize inorganic materials using x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES) techniques.
• Prepare electronic reports with results, photo documentation, and conclusions on a timely basis.
• Regularly communicate and review testing results with engineers and suppliers.

Minimum Requirements:
• BS degree in Metallurgy, Metallurgical Engineering or Material Science
• Minimum of 3-4 years of experience in materials or material testing with a strong emphasis in metallography, fractography and failure analysis.
• Demonstrated knowledge of common material/sub-system interactions.
• Demonstrated strong interpersonal and communication skills.
• Demonstrated strong Leadership Behaviors.
• Demonstrated computer skills including Word, Excel, and PowerPoint, as well as digital imaging, acquisition and processing.

Requisition ID: 12916BR
Job Title: Laboratory Engineer, Metallurgy & Mechanical Section
Location: Dearborn, Michigan

Interested qualified individuals must apply at www.careers.ford.com for posting 12916BR
Any questions please contact Allen Radke aradke@ford.com or Scott Wolfe swolfe2@ford.com
Lab Engineer Position Description


ArcelorMittal Sponsoring 7th Man Hockey T-shirts

IMG_0768Michigan Tech hockey is pleased to announce a partnership with ArcelorMittal in the 7th Man T-shirt Project. ArcelorMittal has purchased 850 T-shirts for Michigan Tech students to wear at the home-opening series against the University of Michigan on Oct. 31 and Nov. 1.

“I would like to thank ArcelorMittal and Joe Nowosad (MSE ’87) for sponsoring our 7th Man T-shirts,” Tech hockey coach Mel Pearson said. “Any time you host a team like the University of Michigan, it’s a big deal. It’s going to be an exciting weekend of hockey here at the MacInnes Student Ice Arena, and we’re happy our student section will be covered in gold.”

One hundred of the ArcelorMittal 7th Man T-shirts will be handed out at a live radio remote in the Van Pelt and Opie Library on Wednesday, Oct. 29. The hockey team and coaching staff will be on campus promoting the series against Michigan.

The remaining 750 7th Man T-shirts will be handed out at the Experience Tech student entrance at the John MacInnes Student Ice Arena before Friday night’s game.

“We are honored with this opportunity to be the first company to sponsor the 7th Man at Michigan Tech,” Jake Haelfrisch, an engineer at ArcelorMittal said. “ArcelorMittal is very proud to work with such a great partner over the past eight years. The engineers that we’ve hired from Michigan Tech are at all levels of our corporation and this sponsorship is the least we could do to recognize this partnership. We hope that we see an arena filled with Husky Gold. Go Huskies.”

ArcelorMittal employs more than 60 Michigan Tech graduates, and is the world’s leading steel and mining company, with around 232,000 employees in more than 60 countries. They are the leader in all major global steel markets, including automotive, construction, household appliances and packaging. Underpinning all their operations is a philosophy to produce safe, sustainable steel. See the ArcelorMittal website for more information.

“It’s great to see all the Michigan Tech graduates that ArcelorMittal employs,” added Pearson. “They obviously see a value in our students, and we’re thankful that they’re now going to partner our department and team.”


Unplugged: 3D Printing Goes Solar

3D printing guru Joshua Pearce wants nothing more than to provide the means of production to everyone, especially people in developing regions who must get by on very little. But there has been a drawback.

3D printers make all manner of fun and useful things, but they do require electricity. And the grid is notoriously unreliable in many parts of the world. “What do you do if the power goes out while you are right in the middle of printing something?” says Pearce, an associate professor at Michigan Technological University. “It’s not good.”
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Ethical Filament: Can Fair Trade Plastic Save People and the Planet?

It’s old news that open-source 3D printing is cheaper than conventional manufacturing, not to mention greener and incredibly useful for making everything from lab equipment to chess pieces. Now it’s time to add another star to the 3D printing constellation. It may help lift some of the world’s most destitute people from poverty while cleaning up a major blight on the earth and its oceans: plastic trash.
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MSE Seminar: Properties of Glassy Polymers at the Nanoscale versus the Bulk State

Materials Science and Engineering Department, John & Virginia Towers Distinguished Lecture Series Seminar, Tuesday, October 7, 2014, 11:00 am – 12:00 pm, Room 610 M&M Building;

Donald R. Paul, University of Texas at Austin, Title: Properties of Glassy Polymers at the Nanoscale versus the Bulk State

The need for more energy efficient processes continues to drive interest in polymeric membranes for gas separations; removal of carbon dioxide and other impurities from natural gas is one of the important targets for this technology. There is interest in the discovery of new polymer structures for membranes that are more permeable, more selective or more robust particularly with regard to resisting plasticization by highly soluble gases like carbon dioxide. In general, the best polymers for these applications have high glass transition temperatures.

To achieve commercially attractive levels of flux or productivity, most membranes have an asymmetric or composite structure where the separating layer is very thin, of the order of 100 nm in thickness. It is generally assumed that these thin layers have the same permeation properties as thick films, tens of microns in thickness, which are easily prepared in the laboratory for evaluation of membrane materials. In fact, the usual method for estimating the thickness of the separating layer is to compare its gas permeance or flux to the permeability of a thick film. However, there is growing evidence that thin films of glassy polymers with thicknesses of a few hundred nanometers behave quite differently than thick films. A major factor is the observation that thin glassy films undergo physical aging, i.e., approach towards equilibrium, much more rapidly than do bulk glasses presumably due to high segmental mobility at free surfaces. This presentation will summarize recent evidence concerning the differences between thin and thick films with regard to aging, plasticization and thermal history based on gas permeation observations.

Dr. Donald R. Paul is the Ernest Cockrell, Sr. Chair professor in Department of Chemical Engineering at University of Texas at Austin. Prof. Paul got his bachelor degree from North Carolina State College and his master and Ph.D. degree from The University of Wisconsin at Madison. Professor Paul’s research interests include the broad areas of polymer science and engineering and chemical engineering with more than 700 papers published in prestigious journals. He obtained many awards and honors. He is an Elected Member of National Academy of Engineering (1988), Mexican Academy of Sciences (2001), and the Academy of Sciences of Bologna (2011). He is a Fellow for numerous important societies, including the Society of Plastics Engineers (2004), the American Chemical Society (2009), the Materials Research Society (2009), and the ACS Polymer Division (2011). He won Outstanding Lifetime Achievement Award (SPE-TPM&F) (2011), General Motors R&D Most Valued Colleague Award (2009), AIChE Founders Award (2008), Herman F. Mark Polymer Chemistry Award (American Chemical Society) (2005), Alan S. Michaels Award for Innovation in Membrane Science and Technology (NAMS) (2005); NAMS Founders Award (2005); American Chemical Society E.V. Murphree Award (1999); Council for Chemical Research Malcolm E. Pruitt Award (1999); AICHE William H. Walker Award (1998); Society of Plastics Engineers International Award (1993); Society of Plastics Engineers Education Award (1989); AIChE Materials Engineering and Sciences Division Award (1985); American Chemical Society Phillips Award for Applied Polymer Science (1984); Engineering News-Record Award (1976); and the American Chemical Society Arthur K. Doolittle Award (1973) etc. He was the Director of Texas Materials Institute (1998-2011) and the editor-in-chief of Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research (an ACS journal).

DONALD PAUL PDF