Day: January 18, 2012

Jim Trethewey ’67 – A Different Route to Success

"A really good education is your ticket to opening up opportunities. When opportunities struck, I was well prepared to take advantage of them.” Jim Tretheway '67

Taking “the road less traveled” takes courage, especially for a college student. Many students come to Michigan Tech for engineering, but an elective can lead to a different career path. Such is the story of Jim Trethewey.

Trethewey, from Ironwood, began as a mechanical engineering major. Then he took an accounting elective from Professor Sam Tidwell. Because he did well in the course, Tidwell encouraged him to change majors. After some soul-searching, Trethewey switched to accounting.

As an undergraduate, Trethewey was involved in Theta Tau fraternity and intramural sports. His academic achievements led to the honorary accounting fraternity Kappa Sigma Iota. “I made many good friends and liked the students’ work ethic,” says Trethewey. “And, in my career, it turned out to be a very good thing to have a mix of business and technical courses.”

After graduating, Trethewey accepted a position as an auditor for Copper Range, a copper mining concern. He next joined Cleveland-Cliffs (now Cliffs Natural Resources), an iron ore mining company in an exciting growth period, as a financial analyst in its Ishpeming office.

Cleveland-Cliffs offered Trethewey a wide variety of opportunities. From Ishpeming to Ontario to Cleveland, Trethewey worked in positions of increasing responsibility and became vice president-controller and chief accounting officer. Along the way, he also earned his MBA from Baldwin- Wallace College.

In his final years with Cliffs, Trethewey was senior vice president of business development and worked with the senior corporate team in reshaping the company, adding international experience to his career. He retired in 2007.

Looking back, Trethewey says, “A really good education is your ticket to opening up opportunities. When opportunities struck, I was well prepared to take advantage of them.”

Being open to different types of jobs within a company is helpful, as many newly learned skills could be transferred to other areas, he says. “Mobility is also important. Don’t tie yourself down to one location.”

Being involved in both professional and community organizations has also been important to Trethewey. He networked with professionals in the American Mining Association, the Society of Mining Engineers, and other industry groups that gave him a broader understanding of his field.

“I worked with community organizations such as United Way and currently serve on the boards of two charities,” says Trethewey. “I was always looking for ways to give back to society. It’s important to stay active in other things besides work so you can expand yourself.”

Trethewey credits a lot of his success to family support, especially from his wife, Dee. The couple divides their time among a winter home in Florida, a summer home in Chautauqua, New York, and a townhouse in Cleveland, where three of their five children and five of their eight grandchildren live.

Trethewey has found time in his busy retirement to continue giving back to Tech. In 1994, he began serving on the School of Business and Economics advisory board, and since 2009 he has served as a trustee of the Michigan Tech Fund.

Trethewey reflects, “My newer role as a trustee lets me deal with the entire University. It gives me an opportunity to participate in activities with other devoted graduates who care where the University is going. We help raise funds for the University, network, and work to form corporate partnerships. These activities are important to maintain sound financial footing and ensure the University continues to advance.”

As an advisor to the School of Business and Economics, he has been involved in AACSB accreditation, which has been particularly gratifying for Trethewey. Providing input on curriculum and meeting with students and faculty have been valuable for him. He is excited about many School and University programs including the Applied Portfolio Management Program (APMP) and Enterprise.

“I like that the School is getting involved directly with corporations and the hands-on nature of these programs,” he says. In addition, Trethewey has started two endowed scholarships for business students from Gogebic County. Other possible contributions are in the planning stages.

“The School of Business and Economics was my foundation, my beginning on the road to success,” he says. “So it’s really important for me to have a part in its growth. The current direction of the School is right on track. Being involved has given me the opportunity to have a voice in where the School is going and ensure it’s constantly getting better. And that’s very fulfilling.”

This article was originally published in Impact, the Michigan Tech School of Business and Economics magazine.

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Steve Hicks ’83 – Building a Successful Career in the UP, Naturally

Steve Hicks '83 - CEO of Longyear

“Pure Michigan” is the slogan being used by the state to entice visitors to enjoy Michigan’s many treasures. “Pure UP” is the slogan that could easily be used to describe Steve Hicks and his meteoric rise through a UP company with global impact.

Hicks grew up in Iron Mountain. Always interested in the business world, he came to the School of Business and Economics in 1979 because “Tech was a regional school with an excellent reputation.”

Majoring in accounting, Hicks encountered many memorable experiences, including Professor Sam Tidwell of the red tie accounting fame. “He was an interesting and engaging man and it was always fun to be in his class.”

In addition to Tidwell, Hicks was impressed with the overall quality of all the professors and his business education. “The courses were serious, thorough, and solid. I graduated knowing I had a well-grounded foundation not only in accounting but in finance and economics as well.”

This foundation and his own talent and drive soon landed Hicks a job with J. M. Longyear LLC in Marquette. Longyear is a natural resources company with 165,000 acres of commercial timberlands and a large portfolio of iron ore and other mineral rights in the upper Midwest and Ontario.

Hicks began in the accounting department of Longyear, then became vice president of finance, followed by chief operating officer. In 1999, he attended a concentrated residency program for global executives at the University of Michigan School of Business. In that same year, he became CEO of Longyear.

In the past five years, Hicks has led Longyear in more than $2 billion worth of projects, including a $1.5 billion steel mill and a $350 million cellulosic ethanol facility. Cellulosic ethanol is a biofuel produced from wood, grasses, and other plant materials. The steel mill, Essar Steel Minnesota, is expected to be operational in 2012 and is North America’s first iron mining through steel processing facility.

According to Hicks, Longyear is successful in a modern, global marketplace because the company continues to follow the principles that have guided the Longyear companies for more than a century: creating value, maximizing performance, leveraging opportunities, and encouraging sustainability.

Hick’s own personal strategy for success is simple. “In anybody’s career, you’re going to encounter adversity. I think it’s just a matter of working harder and working smarter. And having fun at what you do. I also had good mentors earlier in my career, people who ran global operations and were senior people in law firms.”

Hick’s long career at Longyear has allowed him to remain in the UP. He has been married to his wife, Shelly, for fifteen years. They have two children: Ellie, age eleven, and Collin, age eight. Living in Marquette, the family has been able to be involved in all the outdoor “Pure UP” things that Hicks loves, including hunting and downhill skiing.

Having an impact in the business world has not been enough for Hicks. He has also been a dedicated alum of Michigan Tech. Currently, he is serving on the Michigan Tech Board of Control and on the Board of Trustees of the Michigan Tech Fund, and, in the past, he was involved with the School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science advisory board.

According to Hicks, “I wanted to serve on the Boards to give back and share my experiences and knowledge to assist the University in implementing its vision and strategy. It has been rewarding working with the dedicated men and women who serve on the Board. Clearly everyone whom I’ve been associated with in this tenure has had Michigan Tech’s best short-term and long-term interests in mind.”

Looking ahead, Hicks feels very positive about Michigan Tech’s future and the future of the School of Business and Economics.

“I’m very comfortable with Michigan Tech’s strategy. I think it’s the right strategy for the right time. Michigan Tech is involved with a lot of research and science that, given the current state of the world, will reach emerging markets. The School of Business and Economics has made strategic alignments across the University, taking an integral part in leading innovation to the next step of commercialization. Whether it is in freshwater studies or alternative energy or any other engineering or science disciplines, I’m confident that Tech will be able to help solve the world’s problems and make it better.”

This article was originally published in Impact, the Michigan Tech School of Business and Economics magazine.

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Class of 2011 Rocks Deloitte

Danielle Linna (left) and Theresa Laubrick secured jobs with Deloitte LLP before their spring 2011 graduation.

In a time when graduates are struggling to find jobs, two recent School of Business and Economics alumni have secured positions at the world’s largest accounting company, Deloitte LLP. Danielle Linna and Theresa Laubrick, who graduated this spring, earned Bachelor of Science degrees in Accounting, double majored in finance, and graduated summa cum laude. While some time off from their impressive academic accomplishments would be expected, instead they studied for the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) exam and started positions with the company in fall 2011.

Danielle Linna: Passion for Accounting

Danielle Linna found her passion for accounting in high school. “I took an accounting class my junior year and fell in love with it. Since then, I’ve known it’s what I want to do with my life.”

As a student, Linna was heavily involved in organizations across campus. She furthered her business experience in organizations such as the International Business Ventures enterprise and the accounting club Kappa Sigma Iota, and she also completed the Applied Portfolio Management Program (APMP). As a member of the Delta Zeta sorority, the First Year Experience, and the Michigan Tech Dance Team, Linna rounded out her education and built connections across campus.

Linna believes that her wide range of experience and work with engineers and technology students gave her a competitive advantage over other applicants for her position. “Working with people from different backgrounds allowed me to develop a flexible communication skill set, which will be helpful when dealing with clients.”

This fall, Linna started her position as a staff auditor in Deloitte’s Accounting and Auditing Group in Milwaukee. With a minor in German and an interest in international
accounting, she hopes to participate in a program at Deloitte that will allow her to work for two years at one of the company’s international branches. “I want to make
an impact on national and international accounting standards and financial procedures,” she said.

Theresa Laubrick: Hard Work Pays Off

With a double major in accounting and finance and a minor in music and the Enterprise program, Theresa Laubrick shouldered an undergraduate course load that would make a less motivated student collapse. Far from being overwhelmed, she added on as many extracurricular activities as possible. “Students can use the experience they gain from campus involvement and apply it to their futures and careers,” she said.

During her years at Michigan Tech, Laubrick was a member of Kappa Sigma Iota, participated in Concordia Student Ministries, and served as the CFO for the Aerospace Enterprise. She also worked as a writing coach and teaching assistant in the Michigan Tech Multiliteracies Center, citing the experience as an important factor in her personal and professional development.

In her position with Deloitte, Laubrick blends her love of working with people and her technical interests. At the company’s Detroit branch, she works in the Tax Department’s Research and Development Credit Group, where she is responsible for data analysis, write-ups, and generating the tax credit for clients with large R&D
programs, including engineering firms.

In the coming years, Laubrick hopes to shape her career according to words of wisdom from Stephen W. Gilman, the founder of the business honor society Beta Gamma Sigma: “Success is not to be measured by income but by influence, not by power but by personality, not by capital but by character.”

Hats off to Danielle and Theresa for passing the CPA in summer and fall of 2011.

This article was originally published in Impact, the Michigan Tech School of Business and Economics magazine, and was written by Erin Kauppila.

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