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    Breaking Digital Barriers

    Associate Professor of Computer Science Charles Wallace is rethinking cyberlearning top to bottom. He’s working with K–12 and undergraduate students, software development professionals, and senior citizens to improve how humans communicate and learn in computer-intensive environments. Digital literacy is a basic human need. There is a revolution sweeping the nation, but millions of senior citizens…


    Ending of Moore’s Law is the Beginning

    Every field of science and commerce now relies on computers and their capability to process data and information—fast. Moore’s law enabled doubling the number of transistors that can be put on a chip every 18 months. The ever-growing performance of computers is due to two main factors: our ability to shrink electronic circuits to smaller…


    Power Grids and People

    Today’s infrastructure is connected in ways not always known until problems like extreme weather, diseases, major accidents, terror, or cyber threats arise. Say fuel delivery will be delayed. What can be done? Sixteen critical infrastructure sectors—including water, gas, energy, communications, and transportation—are linked and interdependent. The National Science Foundation is supporting new fundamental research to…


    Tiny Microgrids, Fiercely Important

    A microgrid is a standalone power grid requiring generation capabilities (often generators, batteries, or renewable resources) plus control methods to maintain power flow. Electronics, appliances, and heating or cooling are all responsible for consuming that power. In this project, Laura Brown and other Michigan Tech researchers are investigating a control system for such microgrids that…


    Transfer Learning in Data Centers

    Faster apps. More memory. Laura Brown and Zhenlin Wang bring efficiency to Big Data. What memory resources will be available if applications A, B, and C all run together? Big companies like Amazon and Google have even bigger data centers. Think 30 data centers each with 50,000 to 80,000 servers. And the underlying computer processors…