Tag Archives: Alumni



Michigan Tech Alumnus, Apps Turn Ordinary People into Hydrologists

Adam Ward’s got a lot of helping hands as he tries to determine stream and lake depths in Iowa. Through CrowdHydrology.org, anyone can read the water level off a ruler (more scientifically, stream stage off a staff gauge) and text the numbers to an online database.

The citizen scientists are helping researchers elsewhere, too—New York, Wisconsin, Utah and Michigan—and it’s all the brainchild of Ward’s colleague, Chris Lowry, an assistant professor in the Department of Geology at the University of Buffalo.

“With budget cuts proliferating, I had to figure out how to measure streams in a cheap fashion,” says Lowry. “I got a giant ruler, laminated a sign at Kinko’s and set up the first gauge using Google voicemail and help from the USGS for the texts. It worked.”

For the full news story, see CrowdHydrology.

Published in Tech Today by Dennis Walikainen, senior content specialist


Alumni Power at the Straits of Mackinac

It’s a Michigan Tech electrical engineer’s dream: Connect the two Michigan peninsulas’ power grids using the latest technology in a massive project, the first of its kind. And Tech alumni are playing huge roles in it all.

A high-voltage, direct current (HVDC) device is being installed near St. Ignace in the Upper Peninsula to control increased power transfers in the original but updated transmission system. American Transmission Company (ATC) owns the lines in the UP, and the International Transmission Company (ITC), owns the Lower Peninsula lines.

“It’s the fourth generation of HVDC technology using voltage source converters,” says Adam Manty, 2006 and 2008 Michigan Tech alumnus and special studies engineer for ATC (one of many alumni working there and on the project). “It’s the newest, latest and greatest, and it’s the first large-scale back-to-back configuration of its kind in the world.”

Read the full news story.

Published in Tech Today by Dennis Walikainen, senior content specialist


Alumna named American Geosciences Institute/Schlumberger Geoscience Communication Fellow

Stephanie Tubman, an alumna of the Peace Corps Master’s International (PCMI) program, has been named American Geosciences Institute/Schlumberger Geoscience Communication Fellow. Tubman will be working with AGI’s Critical Issues Program to disseminate geoscience information to help support decision-making at the federal, state and municipal levels.

Following her undergraduate degree at Colgate University, she completed an internship at the US Geological Survey Cascades Volcano Observatory and enrolled in the PCMI program in geohazards mitigation.

During her two-year tour in Guatemala with the Peace Corps, she was assigned to a municipal environmental office, collaborating with local officials on water management, environmental science education and ecotourism projects.

Published in Tech Today.



Alumnus receives 2014 TMS Young Leader Professional Development Award

Research Assistant Professor Zhiwei Peng (MSE) has received a 2014 TMS Young Leader Professional Development Award from the Minerals, Metals & Materials Society. The award is supported by the TMS Foundation.

Peng, who recently completed a PhD in Materials Science and Engineering at Michigan Tech, was honored with the 2013 Bhakta Rath Award for his exceptional research on the use of microwaves to make steel. “I am truly grateful for the education at Michigan Tech which laid a solid foundation for my career,” said Peng. “I am also deeply indebted to my advisor, Jiann-Yang Hwang, for his excellent and invaluable guidance during my PhD studies.”

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Alumnus makes Surprising Finds on St. Thomas, Virgin Islands

He’s digging up the past–somewhere between 200 BC and 400 AD–in an unexpected archaeological excavation in downtown Charlotte Amalie on the Caribbean island of St. Thomas in the US Virgin Islands.

David Hayes, who got his MS in Industrial Archaeology from Michigan Tech in 2000, is principal investigator for a year-old dig that began when he noticed pottery popping out of a highway improvement site. The highway work was stopped, and the pieces have since been dated to early ceramic makers and farmers of the Saladoid era, 2000 to 1,400 years ago.

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