Category Archives: Publications

APS Blog “I Spy Physiology” Publishes Post by KIP Student Kelvyn Van Laarhoven

KIP MS Student Kelvyn Van Laarhoven

The American Physiological Society recently published a blog story by KIP Masters student Kelvyn Van Laarhoven. Kelvyn’s story, “The Iceman: Wim Hof is a Real-life Superhero” was published in the “I Spy Physiology” blog by APS on March 13th.

The blog post explores the physiological effects of certain controlled breathing techniques used by a Dutch adventurer that allow him to survive conditions of extreme and prolonged cold. You can read the full blog post here.

Kelvyn graduated with his Bachelor of Science degree in Exercise Science from Michigan Tech last Spring. He is currently pursuing his Masters degree from the department of Kinesiology and Integrative Physiology at Michigan Tech. His academic interests include sports medicine, physical therapy and human performance.


Trewartha’s Article Published in Cognition

Kevin Trewartha
Kevin Trewartha, PhD

Assistant Professor Kevin Trewartha (CLS/KIP) was recently published in Cognition, an international journal that publishes theoretical and experimental papers on the study of the mind.  His article titled “Linking actions and objects: Context-specific learning of novel weight priors” is a fun read that explores how context impacts our memory for objects.

His work was also featured in Michigan Tech News.


New Publications

PhD Candidate Ida Fonkoue and Dr. Jason C​arter recently published a paper titled “Sympathetic Neural Reactivity to Mental Stress in Humans: Test-Retest Reproducibility” in the American Journal of Physiology-Regulatory, Integrative, and Comparative Physiology.

The present study is the first to examine the reproducibility of MSNA (muscle sympathetic nerve activity) responsiveness to mental stress.  Our finding of reporducible MSNA reactivity to mental stress is an important step in providing a foundation for future research that might elucidate whether MSNA reactivity might have similar, or perhaps even superior, predictive value for hypertention compared with the CVR (cardiovascular reactivity) hypothesis.

To read the full abstract, follow this link:  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26400186