Category Archives: Research

2019 Rekhi Innovation Challenge Winners

Beach ChallengeThe 2019 Rekhi Innovation Challenge ended Feb. 28. This year there were seven teams competing. The Rekhi Challenge is a crowdfunding competition to help promote and support student innovation and entrepreneurship through Michigan Tech’s crowdfunding site, Superior Ideas. A total of $3,035 was raised between the projects. Congratulations to the Automated Beach Safety Flag project for raising the most at $2,245. This project team will receive a matching gift of $1,000.

Here are results in the other prize categories:

Most Unique Visitors – 1st Place Wins $50 For Their Project

  • 1st place – Audio to Visual Translator
  • 2nd place – Automated Beach Safety Flag
  • 3rd place – LifePro Jackets

Most Unique Funders – 1st Place Wins $50 For Their Project

  • 1st place – Audio to Visual Translator
  • 2nd place – Automated Beach Safety Flag
  • 3rd place – LifePro Jackets

Social Media Engagement – 1st Place Wins $50 For Their Project

  • 1st place – Automated Beach Safety Flag
  • 2nd place – Audio to Visual Translator
  • 3rd – LifePro Jackets

Most Creative Marketing Communications Strategy – 1st Place Wins $50 For Their Project

  • 1st place – Automated Beach Safety Flag

The Audio to Visual project won a total of $100 in prize money and the Automated Beach Safety Flag project won a total of $1,150. Thanks to all of the donors that contributed to these projects. Your support for student innovation and entrepreneurship at Michigan Tech is greatly appreciated.

Superior Ideas was established in 2012 to help bring University research and public service projects to life. The site uses crowdfunding to raise money and awareness for University research and public service projects that may not qualify for grant funding.

Meet the Researchers

Audio to Visual Translator

Automated Cellular Beach Safety Flag System

  • Jacob Soter
  • Andrew Barnard is an assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics.

APS Lab Efficient Platooning Featured by dSPACE

Christopher Morgan Efficient Platooning Interview

Michigan Tech’s Advanced Power Systems (APS) lab was one of the cover stories in the January edition of dSPACE Magazine. The story “Efficient Platooning,” begins on page 22, and features quotes and a photo of Christopher Morgan (ME-EM). There is also a video link in connection with the story.

Efficient Platooning

Cooperative and predictive control strategies boost energy efficiency in automated vehicles

“The purpose of the project is to use upcoming technologies, such as automated vehicles, V2I, V2X, and sensors, to improve energy consumption on modern vehicles,” says Chris Morgan, Operations Manager at Michigan Tech.

Read more at dSPACE.

Michigan Technological University: Efficient Platooning

Students and Faculty at Michigan Technological University’s Advanced Power Systems Lab (APS Labs) are deeply involved in the NEXTCAR project, as they strive to boost vehicle energy efficiency through driverless technologies.

NEXTCAR stands for Next-Generation Energy Technologies for Connected and Autonomous On-Road Vehicles – an initiative that is funded through the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) of the U.S. Department of Energy.

The video features interviews with:

  • Jeffrey Naber, Director, APS, Michigan Tech
  • Maribeth Yabes, Engineering Group Manager, General Motors
  • Christopher Morgan, Operations Manager, APS, and Instructor, Mechanical Engineering, Michigan Tech
  • Chuck Drews, IT Systems – Pilot Systems
  • Stuart Steel, Program Manager – Pilot Systems

WATCH THE VIDEO


American Heart Association Postdoctoral Fellowship for Michael Hill

Michael Hill
Michael Hill

Michael Hill, PhD, researcher in the Department of Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics, has received an American Heart Association Postdoctoral Fellowship in the amount of $104,060 over two years.

The funding is for his proposal on “Nanoengineered Polymers for Mature Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived Cardiomyocytes.”

The goal of the proposal is to produce multiscale materials that can mimic the signals which govern cell behavior in the human heart, in order to guide stem cells into becoming cardiac muscle cells.

Dr. Hill and colleagues work in the lab of Assistant Professor Parisa Abadi, where they are using nanomaterials to develop solutions to medical problems. Due to the shortage of organ donors, myocardial infarction—or heart attack—is one of the major killers in the United States. The research team is seeking to use nanomaterials to engineer systems that can provide viable cardiac muscle cells for cell therapy post-myocardial infarction. These studies could provide a rationale for nanoscale material design for producing patient-specific cardiac cells which help regenerate damaged heart tissue.


Allen and Bellur Present on Phase Change Studies

Jeffrey Allen (ME-EM) gave the presentation “Accommodation Coefficients During Liquid-Vapor Phase-Change: A Cryo/Neutron Study,” at the Gordon Research Conference (GRC) “Micro and Nanoscale Phase Change Heat Transfer,” in Barga, Italy.

Postdoctoral Scholar Kishan Bellur presented a poster at the conference.

The conference took place February 3 – 8, 2019. The GRC and associated Gordon Research Seminar are focused on fundamental descriptions of phase change processes and how these forces interact to prescribe how equipment can be designed and processes can be run.

Jeffrey S. Allen
Jeffrey S. Allen
Kishan Bellur
Kishan Bellur




ME-EM is Represented at Noise and Vibration Conference

ISMA 2018 conference sign outsideThree members of the Department of Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics presented at and attended the ISMA-USD Noise and Vibration Engineering conference at KU Leuven in Leuven Belgium. The 28th International Conference on Noise and Vibration engineering (ISMA2018) was organized in conjunction with the 7th International Conference on Uncertainty in Structural Dynamics (USD2018) on September 17-19, 2018. Approximately 700 people (50% from industry, 50% from universities) attended the conference.

View the Photo Gallery

Jon Furlich, PhD student presented “Application of STFT and Wavelet analysis to MT clunk data: a case study.” Andrew Barnard (ME-EM) presented “Active noise control in pipes and ducts using carbon nanotube thermophones” and “Top 10 mechanical experiments for the teaching of sound and vibration in mechanical engineering”. Barnard also taught a seminar on acoustics in London Sept. 20.

  • Furlich, J. E., Blough, J., and Robinette, D. L., ‘Analysis of experimental mt clunk with stft and cwt to observe mode participation and reduction’, Michigan Technological University. ( abstractfull paper )
  • Barnard, A., and Senczyszyn, S., ‘Active noise control in pipes and ducts using carbon nanotube thermophones’, Michigan Technological University. ( abstractfull paper )
  • Peres, M. A., and Barnard, A., ‘Top 10 mechanical experiments for the teaching of sound and vibration in mechanical engineering’, The Modal Shop, Inc.. ( abstractfull paper )

Read more at ISMA Past Editions.

Jason Blough (ME-EM) chaired a session, attended the conference and met with peers to discuss future research topics.


Craig Friedrich Presents at Arthroplasty Conference

ISTA 2018 showing the conference audience and stage.

Craig Friedrich (ME-EM) presented two podium papers, “Enhanced Bone Fixation of TKA Tibial Tray Implants with TiO2 Nanotubes” and “In Vivo Anti-Bacterial Effectiveness of Nanotextured Titanium Implant Surfaces” at the 31st International Society for Technology in Arthroplasty (ISTA) Conference in London, England.

The conference, which addressed innovative solutions for arthroplasty, took place Oct. 10-13, 2018 at the Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre. Established in 1988, ISTA is dedicated to advancing the art and science of technology in joint replacement by connecting the leading clinicians, engineers, researchers, and industry members from around the globe.

View the Photo Gallery

Enhanced Bone Fixation of TKA Tibial Tray Implants With TiO2 Nanotubes

Daniel Justin – Nanovation Partners – Orlando, USA
Young S. Ngyuen – Optimotion Implants, LLC – Orlando, USA
William Walsh – University of New South Wales – Randwick, Australia
Matt Pelletier – Surgical &Orthopaedic Research Laboratory – Sydney, Australia
Craig R. Friedrich – Michigan Technological University – Houghton, USA
Erin Baker – Beaumont Health System – Royal Oak, USA
Sungho Jin – University of California San Diego – San Diego, USA
Clyde Pratt – Kinamed. Inc. – Camarillo, USA

Recent clinical data suggest improvement in the fixation of tibia trays for total knee arthroplasty when the trays are additive manufactured with highly porous bone ingrowth structures.

Read more at ISTA Online.

In Vivo Anti-Bacterial Effectiveness of Nanotextured Titanium Implant Surfaces

Craig R. Friedrich – Michigan Technological University – Houghton, USA
Erin Baker – Beaumont Health System – Royal Oak, USA
Sachin Bhosle – Michigan Technological University – Houghton, USA
Daniel Justin – Nanovation Partners – Orlando, USA

Periprosthetic infection remains a clinical challenge that may lead to revision surgeries, increased spending, disability, and mortality.

Read more at ISTA Online.


Sain and Imam Publish on Composite Materials

Solids and Structures journal coverTrisha Sain (ME-EM) and Muhammed Imam authored the paper “Effects of cohesive interfaces and polymer viscoelasticity on improving mechanical properties in an architectured composite,” in the International Journal of Solids and Structures.

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijsolstr.2018.10.008

Extract

Improving the functionality of composite materials is a key requirement for various aerospace, auto-motive, sports and defense applications. The trend is to identify mechanisms, design, constituents, and, preferably, the combination of all of them that can result into better mechanical properties in the conflicting domain of interest (e.g. high stiffness and high damping or high stiffness and high toughness) without adding much complexity in the analysis and design.

The present work considered an “interconnected” geometry inspired by biological materials in a composite material made of very different material properties. Our computational study showed that the interconnection was effective in improving the load transfer between two dissimilar materials by the virtue of contact-friction mechanism, compared to layered materials.