Category Archives: Awards

Lindsay Sandell Named a University Innovation Fellow

Lindsay Sandell
Lindsay Sandell

Congratulations to Abigail Kuehne (Psychology and Communication, Culture, and Media/ Applied Cognitive Science and Human Factors ’21), Sam Raber (Psychology ’22), Lindsay Sandell (Biomedical Engineering ’21), and Gary Tropp (Computer Network and System Administration ’22), who have been named University Innovation Fellows by Stanford University’s Hasso Plattner Institute of Design (d.school).

Read more and watch the video at the Pavlis Honors College blog.


Sangyoon Han Wins Best Poster Award for Cell Adhesion Research

Sangyoon Han Accepts Award
Sangyoon Han (left) accepts the poster prize. Image from Alessandra Cambi.

Sangyoon Han (biomedical engineering) was awarded the Dutch Society of Cell Biology’s Best Poster Award for his work on cell adhesion and migration in inflammation and cancer.

The title of his poster is “Talin-vinculin pre-complex formation dictates maturation of nascent adhesions by accelerated force transmission and vinculin recruitment.”

The 6th ZOO Meeting took place at Blijdorp Zoo, Rotterdam, The Netherlands, May 15-18, 2019.

The ZOO meeting series has become a landmark event in the field of cell adhesion and migration due to unique theme selection, high scientific profile with excellent speakers and limited number of attendees.



BME Students Place in 2019 World Water Day Poster Competition

Cholera Poster DetailThanks to all who participated in this year’s World Water Day. Thanks to all of the students who entered posters, the judges, our guest speaker, discussion facilitators,  panelists, artists and the committee who pulled it all together.

The keynote lecture, “Mapping the Water Crisis of Unaffordability,” was by Monica Lewis-Patrick from We the People of Detroit.

The 2019 World Water Day Poster Award winners:

Original Research Awards

Coursework/Informational Awards

World Water Day at Michigan Tech was sponsored by the Great Lakes Research Center, the Departments of Social Sciences and Civil and Environmental Engineering, the School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science, the Sustainable Futures Institute, Center for Diversity and Inclusion,  Department of Visual and Performing Arts and the Western Upper Peninsula Planning and Development Region.

By the Great Lakes Research Center.


Award Winning Stent Project Could Save Babies

TranscatheterPosterExpo2017
Team with Transcatheter Poster
Design Expo 2017

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. – Babies with hypoplastic left heart syndrome may soon be able to forego risky surgery due to a device designed by doctors, students, and technicians from West Michigan.

The condition is complex: a portion of the baby’s heart is pumping with only one chamber instead of two.

Dr. Joseph Vettukattil, chief of pediatric cardiology at Spectrum Health, is working with Spectrum Health Innovations and students and staff from Michigan Technological University in Houghton, Mich.

Dr. Brent Mulder, the Senior Director of Spectrum Health Innovations, says the final product could take up to 10 years to complete, but the wait will be worth it.

Read more and watch the video at FOX 17 West Michigan, by Erica Francis.

The undergraduate student team involved in the project include Emma Davis, Kat Farkas, Amanda Gogola, and Ami Kling, Biomedical Engineering. Their advisors were Jeremy Goldman and Smitha Rao, Biomedical Engineering. For Design Expo 2017 at Michigan Tech, they prepared a project “Customizing Transcatheter Nitinol Stents for Treatment of Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome in Infants” with abstract:

Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) is a congenital heart defect that is mainly characterized by the underdevelopment of the left ventricle. Currently, multiple open heart surgeries are performed to correct this problem. Our team’s goal was to help eliminate the need for the first surgery by designing and testing catheter deployment of a modified nitinol stent with improved patient matching. The idea of deforming the stent with a microsphere to better fit anatomically relevant infant heart geometries was explored, as well as the feasibility of the use of this deformed shape.

The project was sponsored by Spectrum Health Innovations—Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital. It won several awards at the Design Expo:

  1. Pavlis Honors College Innovation Center for Entrepreneurship Innovation Award: First Place
  2. Ann Arbor SPARK Design Expo Image Contest: Second Place
  3. Black & Veatch Building a World of Difference® Student Design Awards: Senior Design Awards (based on poster): Third Place

BME Senior Design Projects Place First Through Third at Design Expo 2017

Design Expo 2017 took place on Thursday, April 13, on campus in the Memorial Union Building Ballroom.

Hosted by the Pavlis Honors College and the College of Engineering, Design Expo highlights hands-on, discovery-based learning at Michigan Tech.

Undergraduates in Biomedical Engineering excelled at this year’s Design Expo.

Black&Veatch Building a World of Difference® Student Design Awards:

Senior Design Awards (based on poster)

1st place: BME – Enhanced Measurement and Analysis of Gait Disturbances – Aspirus

3rd place: BME – Customizing Transcatheter Nitinol Stents for Treatment of Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome in Infants – Spectrum Health

Senior Design Honorable Mention

BME – Blubber-Only Implantable Satellite Tracking Device for Humpback Whales

Pavlis Honors College Innovation Center for Entrepreneurship Innovation Award:

1st place: BME – Customizing Transcatheter Nitinol Stents for Treatment of Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome in Infants

2nd place: BME – Instrumentation of Manual Medical Devices

3rd place: BME – Posture Correction Device with Haptic Feedback for Parkinson’s Disease

VIEW THE PHOTOS

Pavlis Third Place
Posture Correction Device with Haptic Feedback for Parkinson’s Disease
Pavlis Second Place
Instrumentation of Manual Medical Devices
Pavlis First Place
Customizing Transcatheter Nitinol Stents for Treatment of Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome in Infants

Biomedical Engineers Inducted into Order of the Engineering

On April 18, 2016, the Department of Chemical Engineering hosted its Order of the Engineer induction ceremony.

The ceremony welcomed 53 new members to the order, including two biomedical engineers and three faculty and staff members.

In 2015, 27 members were inducted, bringing the total of the Michigan Tech Chemical Engineering cohort to 134 since 2014.

Read more at Tech Today, by Chemical Engineering.


BME Students Win Awards in Design Expo

The International Business Ventures took first place in the Enterprise program and the

First Place Award Enterprise IBV (International Business Ventures)
Team Leaders: Leslie LaLonde and Andrew Clark, Biomedical Engineering
Advisors: Robert Warrington, Pavlis Honors College
Sponsor: Pavlis Honors College

Project Overview: The Infant Heart Annunciator is a small, BandAid-shaped device that detects an infant’s electrocardiogram, producing a visible flash and audible tone. Often in developing countries, those present at birth do not have the training or equipment needed to determine if an unresponsive infant is alive. Our goal is to eliminate this unnecessary loss of life. Our team is also designing a simple, yet reliable, ventilator that can be stockpiled by hospitals. Typically, hospitals maintain sufficient numbers of ventilators; however, an increase of patients resulting from a pandemic could create a shortage of ventilators. The current high cost of most ICU ventilators prevents hospitals from stockpiling these machines.

Part of the First Place team  that won the Enterprise Award  IBV (International Business Ventures)
Part of the First Place team that won the Enterprise Award IBV (International Business Ventures)

BME Team won Honorable Mention – Compliance Keweenaw: Aspirus Keweenaw Hand-washing Compliance System
Team Members: Anna Waller, Jannah Brandt, Drew Markel, Creighton Bradley, and Rebecca Manshaem, Biomedical Engineering
Advisor: Bruce Lee, Biomedical Engineering
Sponsor: Aspirus Keweenaw

Project Overview: Hand hygiene is of importance to hospitals not only for the safety and health of employees but also to reduce the spread of hospital-acquired infections and protect patients. Aspirus Keweenaw recruited our team to create an automated system to track hand-washing compliance among employees to assist them in their goal of 100 percent compliance. We created a system using a microcontroller and RFID readers to detect when a healthcare worker enters a patient’s room and reaches compliance using the sanitizing foam dispenser. This system will be placed near the doorway and communicate with a wristband that identifies the healthcare worker and vibrates as a reminder if compliance is not reached.

 BME Team won Honorable Mention  – Compliance Keweenaw: Aspirus Keweenaw Hand-washing Compliance SystemTeam Members: Anna Waller, Jannah Brandt, Drew Markel, Creighton Bradley, and Rebecca Manshaem, Biomedical Engineering
BME Team won Honorable Mention – Compliance Keweenaw: Aspirus Keweenaw Hand-washing Compliance System
Team Members: Anna Waller, Jannah Brandt, Drew Markel, Creighton Bradley, and Rebecca Manshaem, Biomedical Engineering

BME Teams were featured in the Michigan Tech news article: Design Expo 2015 Success: Winners, Senior Design and Enterprise Projects

See the Design Expo Summary



Study of Key Biomolecule Earns Tolou Shokuhfar CAREER Award

Tolou Shokuhfar will be investigating the inner workings of a protein that plays a key role in human health with funding from a five-year, $400,000 Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award.

Shokuhfar,a faculty member of both departments of biomedical engineering and mechanical engineering-engineering mechanics at Michigan Technological University, will study the biomolecule ferritin, which stores iron in the body in a non-toxic, mineralized form and releases it safely. In humans, ferritin serves as a buffer between iron deficiency and iron overload, and when it malfunctions, it may be involved in a number of degenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.
MORE

See previous article: A graphene water balloon may soon open up new vistas for scientists seeking to understand health and disease at the most fundamental level.
It’s the Water: Graphene Balloon Yields Unprecedented Images of Hydrated Protein Molecules