Category: Uncategorized

Two Bows seeks funds for summer apparel line!

Two Bows-- the apparel line with the outdoorsy woman in mind-- is seeking funding for their summer line samples!

Three years ago Management major Jessica Tompkins started her own company Two Bows LLC .  Now a senior in the School of Business and Economics, Jessica needs our support!

Two Bows has been accepted by Kickstarter – an online threshold pledge system for funding creative projects– to raise funds for their Spring/Summer apparel line. She encourages everyone to follow the project, choose a reward, and pass along the word.  Two Bows only has 30 days to reach their goal of $5,000.  This money would then allow them to move forward taking the next big step to develop their company.

Jessica credits the School of Business and Economics and her classes for her growing success. Day by day she uses skills and knowledge she has gained at Michigan Tech while continuing to build the company’s foundation. Two Bows has previously been funded from several resources including: business competitions, Crowdbackers crowdfunding, and non-monetary awards. These sources, combined with social media (Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin) have enabled her to market the company at a low cost.

However, in an effort to grow Two Bows, they are searching for additional funding sources to add a Spring/Summer line. This new line will supplement the products currently being sold for Fall and Winter. Jessica hopes the new line will allow Outdoorsy girls, like her, to be comfortable and look great while enjoying the hobbies they love!

By meeting their $5000 goal, Two Bows will have enough funding to create their new line, have professional photos taken, and update their website.  They only have 30 days to raise the money, and get their backers the rewards they earn in return for their funding! The rewards stack, so the more you back, the more you receive. Every donation helps!

Two Bows needs all the support it can get to reach their goal!  Let’s help out one of our own, click here to read more and make a donation!


Students Tackle Silicon Valley over Spring Break

The School of Business and Economics led a student group to Silicon Valley for an Alternative Spring Break trip.

Alternative Spring Break trips are all the rage at Michigan Tech!  These trips enable students an affordable way to get away from Houghton and have some fun over Spring Break.  The School of Business and Economics offers a students the opportunity to tour the high tech companies of California’s Silicon Valley.

“Going on the Silicon Valley trip was a great way to spend break because I got to meet a lot of cool and inspirational people, while touring top-notch technology companies,” says scientific and technical communications major Armando Flores. The School of Business and Economics organized this trip to give students a backstage pass to tech giants like Google, Autodesk, Cisco and Brocade Communications. The visits came with plentiful opportunities to network, learn about business strategies and explore a whole new world of career options.

Aside from connecting with industry leaders, the students got to experience a culture that differs from what they are accustomed to. “I caught a glimpse of what life is like in California. It really is a melting pot of people, culture and innovation,” Flores says.

The trip wasn’t strictly business, however. The students also had time for fun, creating memories that will last a lifetime. “The most memorable experiences for me were visiting The Gallery at Autodesk, riding a G-Bike at Google and then visiting the Hacker Dojo,” says Flores. “Swimming in the ocean was pretty cool too.”

These thrilling experiences may have made returning to classes a challenge, but they also gave Flores something to strive for. “The trip put everything into perspective and motivated me to keep working hard. One way or another, I will go back,” he says firmly.

Click here to read the full Tech Today article that describes other Alternative Spring Break opportunities Michigan Tech students engaged in this year.


Common Sense Investing Event Benefits Business Students

Last Thursday evening, Vice President of Trust Investments at Superior National Bank, Chris Gariepy, spoke to a full room of Michigan Tech students as he shared his knowledge on common sense investing.  Chris discussed highlights from his career on investing and money management.  This event was supported by the Finance Club which promotes interest and knowledge in the field of Finance. The objectives of the Club are to increase interest in finance among Michigan Tech business students by relating the experiences of students, professors and alumni and to provide business students a comprehensive understanding of the finance industry.

Superior National Bank Vice President of Trust Investments addresses students at Finance Club event.

Chris also provided valuable insight into what it takes as a new college graduate to start investing.  Senior, finance major Walker Derby, said “I really enjoyed hearing from someone local who had pertinent advice for people going into the field as well as for individuals who are looking for a greater grasp on financial knowledge.”  Derby also noted that having someone with extensive experience in the financial industry address questions was enlightening, especially for students who are new to the field.

Students in attendance from all School of Business and Economics majors benefited from the event.  The information that Chris brought was insightful on real world applications and interactions of finance, management, economics, and accounting concepts.


A Michigan Tech Education Pays Off

Michigan Tech graduates know the value of their education.

Is a college education a good investment?

No question about it, according to a report just issued by the website PayScale.com. In its 2012 Return on Investment (ROI) rankings, PayScale reports that a bachelor’s degree from Michigan Tech can be expected to yield more than $450,000 over a high school diploma in 30 years.

Michigan Tech placed 102nd among 850 US colleges and universities ranked in PayScale’s latest ROI report. According to the report, a Michigan Tech bachelor’s degree provides a return on investment of 9.6 to 11.1 percent.

“You would have a difficult time getting 11 percent every year going forward in the stock market without taking on a lot of risk,” said President Glenn Mroz. “And this is an investment people make in themselves that pays dividends beyond a simple ROI, since it affects a person’s quality of life and that of their family, often for generations.”

The ROI report also compared the cost of a degree at each of the colleges and universities ranked. It reports that a degree from Michigan Tech costs an average of $103,200, including tuition, fees, room and board, and books and supplies, with 91 percent of students receiving financial aid. At the top 10 schools on PayScale’s ROI list–all private–a degree costs between $203,500 and $212,900.

“The top of the list is dominated by expensive private schools and public universities with a strong STEM focus, demonstrating the value of STEM degrees,” Mroz pointed out.

Graduate School Dean Jackie Huntoon agreed. “I think this is a more rational ranking than the US News report, since it is based less on other academics’ perceptions and more on student outcomes,” she said.

(This article was written by Jennifer Donovan, Director of Public Relations, and was orignially posted in Tech Tody).


Anne Herron Visits MIS Students

Associate Professor Mari Buche and Anne Herron collaborate to benefit MIS students.

The School of Business and Economics got a visit from Anne Herron this week, who came to campus to speak with Associate Professor Mari Buche’s Business Intelligence class.  Having graduated from Michigan State with a B.S. in Chemistry, Anne started her professional career working for DOW Chemical as an analytical chemist in polymer sciences.  After leaving DOW, Anne has remained at Allis Information Management, Inc. (AIM) for fifteen years and has climbed the ladder to the role of Vice President and co-owner of the company.  Her responsibilities include work in client/project development, and managing a team of information researchers and analysts.    

Anne said that her background in chemistry developed her analytical thinking skills, which translated well into the business world.  She was able to offer the perspective of someone working in the industry, coveted by students interested in ways to apply what they learn in their classes.  Under the umbrella of business intelligence, Anne discussed competitive intelligence and how crucial it is to offering companies competitive advantages.  She discussed her company’s focus on guidance for good business practices to optimize opportunity and minimize threats; noting that external and internal information is assessed through research, analysis, and dissemination of information affects everything in the marketplace.  This emphasis on competitive intelligence for companies is something that is leading to an increase in career opportunities for students with degrees in the area of management information systems and related fields.

Management Information Systems students are employed in some of the following professions upon graduation: business data analyst ($55,626), business intelligence specialist ($108,937), and application systems architect ($97,000).  The salaries for the aforementioned jobs are the median national salaries for each position according to salary.com.

After Anne’s lecture, Mari Buche said, “Having a representative from a successful intelligence company come in and talk to our students about career opportunities and industry expectations is a great supplement to coursework for our students.”    AIM boasts a 98% client re-engagement rate which is evidence of their superior performance and customer satisfaction.  Guest lecturers such as Anne Herron offer Tech students a great opportunity to pick the brains of successful people working in their desired field. 

The School of Business and Economics got a visit from Anne Herron this week, who came to campus to speak with Associate Professor Mari Buche’s Business Intelligence class.  Having graduated from Michigan State with a B.S. in Chemistry, Anne started her professional career working for DOW Chemical as an analytical chemist in polymer sciences.  After leaving DOW, Anne has remained at Allis Information Management, Inc. (AIM) for fifteen years and has climbed the ladder to the role of Vice President and co-owner of the company.  Her responsibilities include work in client/project development, and managing a team of information researchers and analysts.    

Anne said that her background in chemistry developed her analytical thinking skills, which translated well into the business world.  She was able to offer the perspective of someone working in the industry, coveted by students interested in ways to apply what they learn in their classes.  Under the umbrella of business intelligence, Anne discussed competitive intelligence and how crucial it is to offering companies competitive advantages.  She discussed her company’s focus on guidance for good business practices to optimize opportunity and minimize threats; noting that external and internal information is assessed through research, analysis, and dissemination of information affects everything in the marketplace.  This emphasis on competitive intelligence for companies is something that is leading to an increase in career opportunities for students with degrees in the area of management information systems and related fields.

Management Information Systems students are employed in some of the following professions upon graduation: business data analyst ($55,626), business intelligence specialist ($108,937), and application systems architect ($97,000).  The salaries for the aforementioned jobs are the median national salaries for each position according to salary.com.

After Anne’s lecture, Mari Buche said, “Having a representative from a successful intelligence company come in and talk to our students about career opportunities and industry expectations is a great supplement to coursework for our students.”    AIM boasts a 98% client re-engagement rate which is evidence of their superior performance and customer satisfaction.  Guest lecturers such as Anne Herron offer Tech students a great opportunity to pick the brains of successful people working in their desired field.