Explore the Finance Major

The Academic Office Building at Michigan Tech during the fall season
A degree in finance from Michigan Tech positions graduates for careers in investments, corporate finance, banking, and insurance. Our flagship program is the Applied Portfolio Management Program (APMP), in which students engage in an entrepreneurial asset management experience managing $1.5 million of real money. APMP is one of the top 50 student-run funds in the nation.

Huskies of all majors are invited to network with finance students and faculty from 4 to 5 p.m. Wednesday, October 17 in the APMP Trading Lab (first floor, AOB). You’ll learn about internship experiences, student organizations, and courses and career options. Snacks and refreshments will be served. Contact Shannon Rinkinen (smrinkin@mtu.edu) with questions.


Explore the Management Information Systems Major

The Academic Office Building at Michigan Tech during the fall season
A degree in management information systems (MIS) from Michigan Tech combines information technologies with business skills. If a student has an interest in computer science and also enjoys working with people, MIS can be a perfect fit.

Huskies of all majors are invited to network with MIS students and faculty from 4 to 5 p.m. Wednesday, October 17 in AOB 101. You’ll learn about internship experiences, student organizations and courses and career options. Snacks and refreshments will be served. Contact Shannon Rinkinen (smrinkin@mtu.edu) with questions.


Alumni Spotlight: Tim Spehar at Therma-Tron-X, Inc.

Last year during Career Fair, Tim Spehar ’17 was an engineering management student. This year, he’s back on campus—as an alumnus and recruiter for Therma-Tron-X, Inc. (TTX), a custom industrial finishing systems manufacturer with locations in Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, and Chicago, Illinois.

Photo of alumni Tim Spehar at Career Fair
Student to recruiter is an eye-opening experience, Tim Spehar ’17, says

Tim serves as a project engineer, managing the design, fabrication, installation, and startup of equipment. “Our organization is flat, so I report to the VP of Engineering, the VP of Special Projects, and our CEO.” At any given time, TTX project engineers like Tim are in charge of 10 mechanical designers during the engineering phase, up to 20 fabricators who assemble subsystems, and 10 on-site installers who erect the system for customers.

Husky Work Ethic on the Job
Once the machine is assembled, Tim’s team travels to the client facility, working multiple rotations as field engineers to start-up and test the equipment, training the customer through the entire process before handing the keys over.

“A rotation is a two-week stint where we work from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., or until we decide to leave,” Tim says. “Some nights have been midnight or later to troubleshoot and stay on schedule. We fly in on a Monday (with our own planes—super sweet perk!) and work through the weekend until the following Friday.”

The rigor doesn’t phase Tim.

 “The rotations are my favorite,” he says. “While we work very tough hours, it is the most rewarding part of the project process. We get to see what was once on paper, become a physical machine. It’s our baby—it’s really cool to see it through beginning to end.”

Back in the office, Tim works with every facet of the organization to see that the project progresses on time, working with the lead designer to manage the drawing release schedule; working with the shop manager to discuss workflow; and working with accounting, shipping, and purchasing, coordinating equipment deliveries to customers. “And through all of this, we interface directly with the customer, helping them get ready for their new paint line, working with chemical coaters to discuss system capabilities and limitations.”

For Tim, getting the job done well is the number one goal—but it hasn’t come easy.

Michigan Tech’s Business Degree Prepared Me
In fact, he admits it was challenging to size the equipment for his first machine project. “But now after three machines it feels like old hat,” Tim says. Having an engineering background and project management experience through Michigan Tech’s engineering management degree has paid off. “Working on a few special projects and standardization projects in-house, I have become one of our go-to foundry systems installers and hydraulics applications engineers.”

“Having opportunities to work with and teach others is so rewarding. Some days feel like day 0, where I’m learning or teaching myself something new to solve problems quickly and creatively, but other days I find myself being pulled in to assist others on the team because I can problem solve so effectively. I really enjoy what I do. It has become a rewarding passion.”

 


Mentoring Opportunity for Entrepreneurial-Minded Students

Michigan Tech campus in the fall.
The Innovation Center for Entrepreneurship, a collaboration between the Pavlis Honors College and the School of Business and Economics, announces a mentoring opportunity for students to meet with successful Michigan Tech alumni.

During Innovation Week (Oct. 15-18), Kanwal Rekhi ‘69, along with other 14 Floors members, have generously offered to meet one-on-one with entrepreneurial-minded Huskies. Students who have an innovative technology, solution, idea, and/or prototype that they would like to get in front of an experienced entrepreneur to talk market assessment and commercialization potential, should apply for the mentoring opportunity. Limited times are available.

This initiative is part of Michigan Tech’s 14 Floors. 14 Floors is a series of events and activities designed to build momentum and enable culture change on campus. Core initiatives focus on fostering entrepreneurship and high-tech innovation within a global culture and economy. Cross-disciplinary activities led by faculty and staff focus on students and are held on and off campus. The effort is made possible through alumni support.


Explore the Engineering Management Major

The Academic Office Building at Michigan Tech during the fall season
A degree in engineering management from Michigan Tech positions students for management careers in the engineering field. By blending engineering know-how with a foundation in business, graduates help meet industry demand for this sought after major (offered by only two schools in the state). As a dual degree, engineering management enhances other disciplines by providing a solid backing of management, and STEM skills and hands-on experience.

Huskies of all majors are invited to network with engineering management students and faculty from 4 to 5 p.m. Wednesday, October 10 in Academic Office Building (AOB) 101. You’ll learn about internship experiences, student organizations and courses and career options. Contact Professor Dana Johnson (dana@mtu.edu) with questions. Pizza and pop will be served