Category: Undergrad Information

Outstanding Man in Business 2020-21

Fourth-year management information systems (MIS) major Chris Arbuckle is the 2020-21 Outstanding Man in Business.

photo of Chris Arbuckle

The Lake Orion, Michigan, native serves as vice president of the Organization for Information Systems, treasurer of Phi Kappa Tau, vice president of administration for the Interfraternity Council, a member of the Order of Omega Honor Society, and was an Orientation Team Leader. He says that being involved in these campus organizations has given him opportunities to work with others, developing the leadership skills required for the future.

As an MIS student, Arbuckle has applied his classroom knowledge into a company website, consulted for a local business, and created a database for his fraternity to better manage membership information.

One of Arbuckle’s MIS professors, Jeff Wall, had this to say: “Chris is an excellent student and an active participant in the campus community. He demonstrates vision and carefully plans his path toward the future. He’s developing into an amazing leader.”

This summer Arbuckle is interning with 3M in the Transformation, Technologies, and Services program where he’ll be working with cloud computing migration. Upon graduating next spring, he plans to pursue a career in business analytics, using his skills and experiences to find technical solutions for business needs.

Outside of his academic and career experiences, Arbuckle enjoys snowboarding, mountain biking, and being outdoors.

The Michigan Tech College of Business offers undergraduate majors in accounting, construction management, economics, engineering management, finance, management, management information systems, and marketing, as well as a general business option. Graduate degrees include the TechMBA®, a Master of  Engineering Management, a Master of Science in Accounting, and a Master of Science in Applied Natural Resource Economics.


Outstanding Woman in Business 2020-21

Fourth-year management information systems (MIS) major Macy Pawielski is the 2020-21 Outstanding Women in Business. Originally from Marquette, Michigan, Pawielski says choosing Michigan Tech has been one of the best decisions she’s ever made.
photo of Macy Pawielski
“I’ve not only had amazing career and leadership opportunities, but I’ve made friendships and professional connections—it’s beyond anything I could have imagined for my college career,” she says.

During her time in the College of Business, she restarted the Organization for Information Systems (OIS) Enterprise, providing fellow MIS students with networking opportunities while developing a close-knit community within the major. Today, Pawielski is president of OIS and serves on the Dean’s Student Advisory Council. She is also a member of the Women in Computer Science organization and has been named to the Dean’s List every semester.

Jeff Wall, associate professor of MIS in the Michigan Tech College of Business, says, “Macy is an outstanding student and leader on and off campus. She has demonstrated time and time again that through her passion and dedication she can make things happen. Macy will have a strong career as a leader in industry.”

Pawielski has interned at 3M for two summers—once within the IT optimization team, followed by a role on the enterprise data quality team.

“I’m very proud of all I have accomplished over my years here at Michigan Tech and I’m honored to receive such a prestigious award.”

The Michigan Tech College of Business offers undergraduate majors in accounting, construction management, economics, engineering management, finance, management, management information systems, and marketing, as well as a general business option. Graduate degrees include the TechMBA®, a Master of  Engineering Management, a Master of Science in Accounting, and a Master of Science in Applied Natural Resource Economics.


Michigan Tech College of Business Earns Accreditation Renewal, Continues 20-Year Tradition of Quality

The Michigan Technological University College of Business (COB) has been approved for an accreditation extension to 2026 by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). 

AACSB is the longest-serving global association dedicated to advancing management education. The association is synonymous with the highest standards in business education and its accreditation has been earned by only 5% of the world’s schools offering business degrees at the bachelor’s level or higher. 

Dean Johnson, dean of the Michigan Tech College of Business, says the renewal is an affirmation of the job the College is doing.

“It’s a reflection of our ability to fulfill AACSB’s mission with our uniquely tech-focused curriculum and premiere faculty research and teaching ability,” he said.

To maintain accreditation, a school is put through a rigorous review every five years, demonstrating quality standards relating to faculty qualifications, strategic use of resources, faculty and student interaction and a commitment to continuous improvement and achievement of learning goals in degree programs. 

Why Accreditation Matters

Johnson explains why AACSB accreditation is vital. “The AACSB has strict standards for curriculum development and faculty qualifications, research and teaching. Accreditation also documents that our program innovatively responds to the ever-changing demands of the business world. The output of this excellence is seen in our students.”

Measured against peers, Michigan Tech accounting students earn the second-highest CPA pass rates in the nation and achieve the highest average score. AACSB is an internationally recognized seal employers know and trust. “Our students land paid internships after their very first semester. Top firms and corporations need our skilled thinkers who are highly adaptable and ready for any challenge,” Johnson added. 

Advancing the Future of Business

In their peer review, AACSB’s Continuous Improvement Review Committee commended COB’s Husky Investment Tournament designed for high school business classrooms. The stock-trading simulation takes pre-college students through a semester-long hands-on stock trading experience while infusing principles of the business world and introducing students to the people and opportunities in business at Michigan Tech. The outreach program provides high school business educators with easily implementable tools and resources, including video modules created by MTU students and faculty. 

In return for their participation, high school students receive a scholarship to Michigan Tech. Since its inception, the Husky Investment Tournament has reached more than 1,000 students from nine states and two countries. 

Additionally in their report, COB was lauded for its demonstrated commitment to developing curriculum centered on technology and analytics. At the undergraduate level, new offerings include a concentration in data analytics in accounting, a minor in business and the state’s first minor in financial technology (FinTech). At the graduate level, updates include a master’s degree in engineering management and graduate certificates in accounting analytics and forensic accounting. 

The College of Business offers undergraduate majors in accounting, construction management, economics, engineering management, finance, management, management information systems and marketing, as well as a general business option. Graduate degrees include the TechMBA®, a Master of  Engineering Management, a Master of Science in Accounting and a Master of Science in Applied Natural Resource Economics.


Appleton Senior Awarded Michigan Tech Impact Scholarship

Michigan Technological University’s College of Business announces Rachel Weyenberg of Appleton, Wisconsin, as the 2021-22 Impact Scholarship recipient.

Weyenberg is the daughter of Amy and Kevin Weyenberg and is a senior at Appleton East High School. She is active as the vice president of competitive excellence in DECA, an association of high school business students who participate in career development, social events, community service activities, and competitions. She credits DECA for helping her discover a passion for business and leading her to Michigan Tech. 

photo of Rachel Weyenberg

On campus in Houghton, Weyenberg plans to pursue construction management, become active in Enterprise, and land an internship. Supported by both the College of Business and the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, the interdisciplinary construction management major was recently named the best construction management program in the state by Universities.com.

“I fell in love with Michigan Tech and all the unique opportunities offered by the University. What made me decide to attend MTU was how amazing the College of Business is. When I toured campus I met with both Associate Dean Buche and Dean Johnson. They made me feel welcomed and at home. I love the one-on-one attention each student receives and the hands-on approach.” Weyenberg says.

The Impact Scholarship, organized by Admissions, Financial Aid, and the College of Business, is an annual competitive award recognizing Michigan Tech business majors. Held virtually this year, 41 high school senior finalists from seven states were invited to participate in leadership activities via Zoom and received renewable awards ranging from $1,000 to full in-state tuition.

“Evaluators were struck by Rachel’s communication skills including public speaking experience as well as her outgoing and positive approach,” says Shannon Rinkinen, director in the College of Business and chair of the Impact Scholarship committee.

Weyenberg is also active in student council, National Honors Society, link crew, pep club, and varsity soccer. In her free time, she enjoys spending time with family and friends, watching movies, and going on road trips.

“I am extremely grateful for the Impact Scholarship. This opportunity will allow me to further my education without the stress of out-of-state tuition. I know that I was meant to be a Husky.”

Next year’s Michigan Tech Impact Scholarship application will open in summer 2021.


My Life On Campus During COVID-19

Emily Kughn is a second-year student in Michigan Technological University’s College of Business, dual majoring in marketing and management with a concentration in supply chain and operations management. The Horton, Michigan, native is also a member of the American Marketing Association. Below is her piece about what it’s like living and learning on campus during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Walking onto campus to start my first year, I felt a huge mix of emotions: happy to start a new chapter, sad to leave my family and friends back home, anxious about what’s to come, and excited about my new independence. Just like any other first-time college student, I had my guesses about what college might be like, but I really had no idea what to expect. I can assure you the last thing I anticipated was a global pandemic!

Fast forward now into my second year at Michigan Tech—my everyday campus life looks much different than it did last year. Obviously, I wish more than anything that this virus never existed, but I’ve learned to forge a new path and create a new normal.

The sense of community on Michigan Tech’s campus is especially strong this year. We’ve found creative ways to come together and show support for one another. Since we can’t attend sporting events, have large gatherings, or socialize much outside of class, it makes the interaction we do get extra special. My favorite ways to safely socialize now include our outdoor movie nights, bonfires, going on hikes, and Zoom calls with my friends.

In order to thrive in online classes, I find it vital to establish a routine to stay organized. I treat my classes the same way I would if they were all in person. I make sure to mask up and head to the library at least twice a week in order to get a change of scenery while studying. I am also still very much involved in student organizations, which keeps me busy.

In the American Marketing Association, we participated in a virtual marketing competition and the Women’s Rugby Club competed against our conference in a virtual season. My student org involvement has been a major blessing; being able to stay connected with others in new ways while also staying involved in things I enjoy.

The most challenging part of the year so far has been not being able to attend all classes in person, not being able to see all of my friends, trying to meet new people, and constantly dealing with the many unknowns.

Finding opportunities to learn and grow given our current circumstances is important. Living and learning on campus during a pandemic definitely comes with challenges. However, I am thankful to be on the campus I love, still doing the things I enjoy (even if virtual for now).