Tag: alumni

DECA sends its thanks to the Michigan Tech Alumni Association

Alum Assoc

The Alumni Association has donated funds to Michigan Tech’s Student Organization, DECA.

DECA wishes to thank the Alumni Association for helping to support the opportunity to attend the State Leadership Conference in Madison, WI this coming spring. Without the association’s help the School of Business and Economics’ DECA Students would not have been able to achieve their goal of competing and representing our University at the state level.

The purpose of the Michigan Tech Alumni Association Board is to sponsor events that allow them to contribute to the University’s strategic goals. The students of DECA and the School of Business and Economics would like to thank the Michigan Tech Alumni Association for their support!


Lyth Donates to School of Business and Economics

By Mark Wilcox mlwilcox@mtu.edu

David Lyth sits with recipients of the Joyce Caylor Lyth Endowed Scholarship and the  Pioneering Women in Business Scholarships at a luncheon in August.

David Lyth sits with recipients of the Joyce Caylor Lyth Endowed Scholarship and the Pioneering Women in Business Scholarships at a luncheon in August

December 3, 2015—

A Michigan Technological University alumnus has provided a gift of $100,000 to the School of Business and Economics to offer financial assistance to women and to honor the memory of his wife.

David Lyth calls his late wife, Joyce Caylor Lyth, “a pioneer,” and he hopes a scholarship at Tech’s SBE will encourage future generations of Upper Peninsula women to follow in her courageous footsteps.

Lyth, a professor at Western Michigan University, met his future wife while they were both undergraduates at Michigan Tech in the late 1960s.

Joyce Lyth

Joyce Lyth, a native of the small Menominee County community of Wallace in the central UP, was diagnosed with brain cancer in 2009 and bravely fought the disease for nearly five years, passing away in March of last year.

“She was a first-generation college student and came to Tech to study accounting at a time when most women went to college to study either teaching or nursing,” He said.

To honor her memory and preserve her legacy, the Joyce Caylor Lyth Memorial Endowed Scholarship is open to female first-generation college students from the Upper Peninsula studying accounting at Tech’s SBE.  It is the first scholarship program of its kind in the business school in that it is for women and was set up by a woman.

“Throughout her career, throughout her life, Joyce was always focused on what was ethical and what was right,” David Lyth said. The couple laid the framework for the scholarship while she was still alive, according to Lyth.

He says referring to his wife as a “pioneer” is not an exaggeration.

“She made her own way in the world, working her way through college.” Lyth says it was rare for UP women to attend college in the 1960s, and as a result, there were no scholarships available to her. Working a variety of jobs, she self-financed her education. Her ground breaking didn’t end with college, in many ways it began.

“She pioneered women moving off campus in 1970, and went on to become chief accountant at Stryker” he said.

Joyce was the controller of two firms in the 80s. 90s and 00s, and on two occasions, she was a business owner.

“She started her own accounting services business in Houghton in 1979 and another in Kalamazoo in 2005 and retired due to her illness in 2009.

Role Model and Mentor

Throughout her business life, Joyce was a role model.

“She very effectively mentored all around her, even after recovery from cancer treatment,” Lyth says.

“This scholarship is a continuation of her legacy. She was about mentoring. She was always looking to help others develop their capabilities and grow professionally,” he says.

The scholarship is designed to have a mentoring component with one year’s recipients mentoring the next.

Pioneering Women in Business Scholarships

In addition, Lyth, in collaboration with the School of Business and Economics, has helped establish the Pioneering Women in Business Scholarship. The program provides four $1,000-a-year scholarships for four years.

“Joyce and I realized the value and importance of an education, especially at Michigan Tech. We want to give others the same opportunities Joyce had,” Lyth said.  “Our aim is to support those who may not be able to come to Tech without some help.”

Lyth is hoping the initiative will inspire support from alumni and friends of the SBE for the Pioneering Women in Business Scholarship program, the Joyce Caylor Lyth Scholarship, or by establishing their own endowed scholarship fund.  David has also included a significant provision for Joyce’s endowed scholarship in his estate plan, to ensure their wish to provide opportunities for young women like Joyce continues far into the future

 Gene Klippel, SBE dean, says the Lyth Scholarships provide excellent opportunities for financial support to female students enrolled or enrolling in the School.

“Making a college education more affordable to our students is a continuous goal of the School,” Klippel said. “Thus, the Joyce Caylor Lyth Memorial Endowed Scholarships and the Dr. David Lyth-supported Pioneering Women in Business Scholarships are indeed most welcomed and greatly appreciated.” 

Klippel hopes the philanthropy of the Lyths will be inspirational. “It is our sincere hope others will see the value such scholarship support provides for our students and be willing to explore with us how they, too, can make a difference in the life of a student.

Michigan Technological University (www.mtu.edu) is a leading public research university developing new technologies and preparing students to create the future for a prosperous and sustainable world. Michigan Tech offers more than 120 undergraduate and graduate degree programs in engineering; forest resources; computing; technology; business; economics; natural, physical and environmental sciences; arts; humanities; and social sciences.


Par-Tee Time 3rd Annual Golf Outing

The Par-Tee Time Golf Outing will be held on August 4th, 2012

It’s that time of year, get your golf clubs out … it’s time to golf!

The School of Business and Economics, along with the MBA Association (MBAA) and the student chapter of the American Marketing Association (AMA), invite you to join us for this great opportunity to network with the new dean, alumni, students, staff, faculty and community members in a friendly competitive environment. Bring your friends, all are invited!

When:
Saturday, August 4th, 2012
9am registration and practice range
10am shotgun start; scramble format

Where:
Portage Lake Golf Course
46789 US Highway 41
Houghton, MI  49931

Cost:
$70/person (must be paid by August 3rd)
MTU student price – $40
Pay day of – $320/team, $80/person
Price includes golf, lunch, cart and two beverage tickets per person.

Cash prizes will be awarded to the winners in each flight (which means if you’re not a very good golfer, you are still eligible to win in your category). There will also be cash prizes for the three course games,  and a special $10,000 Hole In One Contest!

Our raffle list keeps growing, Michigan Tech departments and over 70 local businesses have donated some really great prizes … hotel jacuzzi suites, ski passes, oil change, wheel alignments, spa gift basket, Aroma Therapy Whirlpool to name a few!

To register, please print the registration form here.

You can find more detailed information, as well as  sponsorship opportunities by clicking on the appropriate links.

For questions, please call Tanya at 487-2668, or email golfouting@mtu.edu.


Jim Trethewey ’67 – A Different Route to Success

"A really good education is your ticket to opening up opportunities. When opportunities struck, I was well prepared to take advantage of them.” Jim Tretheway '67

Taking “the road less traveled” takes courage, especially for a college student. Many students come to Michigan Tech for engineering, but an elective can lead to a different career path. Such is the story of Jim Trethewey.

Trethewey, from Ironwood, began as a mechanical engineering major. Then he took an accounting elective from Professor Sam Tidwell. Because he did well in the course, Tidwell encouraged him to change majors. After some soul-searching, Trethewey switched to accounting.

As an undergraduate, Trethewey was involved in Theta Tau fraternity and intramural sports. His academic achievements led to the honorary accounting fraternity Kappa Sigma Iota. “I made many good friends and liked the students’ work ethic,” says Trethewey. “And, in my career, it turned out to be a very good thing to have a mix of business and technical courses.”

After graduating, Trethewey accepted a position as an auditor for Copper Range, a copper mining concern. He next joined Cleveland-Cliffs (now Cliffs Natural Resources), an iron ore mining company in an exciting growth period, as a financial analyst in its Ishpeming office.

Cleveland-Cliffs offered Trethewey a wide variety of opportunities. From Ishpeming to Ontario to Cleveland, Trethewey worked in positions of increasing responsibility and became vice president-controller and chief accounting officer. Along the way, he also earned his MBA from Baldwin- Wallace College.

In his final years with Cliffs, Trethewey was senior vice president of business development and worked with the senior corporate team in reshaping the company, adding international experience to his career. He retired in 2007.

Looking back, Trethewey says, “A really good education is your ticket to opening up opportunities. When opportunities struck, I was well prepared to take advantage of them.”

Being open to different types of jobs within a company is helpful, as many newly learned skills could be transferred to other areas, he says. “Mobility is also important. Don’t tie yourself down to one location.”

Being involved in both professional and community organizations has also been important to Trethewey. He networked with professionals in the American Mining Association, the Society of Mining Engineers, and other industry groups that gave him a broader understanding of his field.

“I worked with community organizations such as United Way and currently serve on the boards of two charities,” says Trethewey. “I was always looking for ways to give back to society. It’s important to stay active in other things besides work so you can expand yourself.”

Trethewey credits a lot of his success to family support, especially from his wife, Dee. The couple divides their time among a winter home in Florida, a summer home in Chautauqua, New York, and a townhouse in Cleveland, where three of their five children and five of their eight grandchildren live.

Trethewey has found time in his busy retirement to continue giving back to Tech. In 1994, he began serving on the School of Business and Economics advisory board, and since 2009 he has served as a trustee of the Michigan Tech Fund.

Trethewey reflects, “My newer role as a trustee lets me deal with the entire University. It gives me an opportunity to participate in activities with other devoted graduates who care where the University is going. We help raise funds for the University, network, and work to form corporate partnerships. These activities are important to maintain sound financial footing and ensure the University continues to advance.”

As an advisor to the School of Business and Economics, he has been involved in AACSB accreditation, which has been particularly gratifying for Trethewey. Providing input on curriculum and meeting with students and faculty have been valuable for him. He is excited about many School and University programs including the Applied Portfolio Management Program (APMP) and Enterprise.

“I like that the School is getting involved directly with corporations and the hands-on nature of these programs,” he says. In addition, Trethewey has started two endowed scholarships for business students from Gogebic County. Other possible contributions are in the planning stages.

“The School of Business and Economics was my foundation, my beginning on the road to success,” he says. “So it’s really important for me to have a part in its growth. The current direction of the School is right on track. Being involved has given me the opportunity to have a voice in where the School is going and ensure it’s constantly getting better. And that’s very fulfilling.”

This article was originally published in Impact, the Michigan Tech School of Business and Economics magazine.


Commencement Legacies

Business Administration grad Tonina Clements with her dad, John '86.

It’s always great to see the generations converge at graduation, even more so when there are alumni from two or more generations gathering. Such was the case at Midyear Commencement.

Tonina Clements (left) will be an assistant manager at Walmart in Houghton. The business administration grad was happy to remain in the Keweenaw and dad, John ’86 was up from Alpena with the family to celebrate the day. John’s degree was in industrial management back in the day.

See Tech Alum for full story.