Tag: Eli Karttunen

Business and Economics students compete in Global CFA Institute Research Challenge

In 2013, Michigan Tech students qualified and competed in the CFA Institute Research Challenge for the first time.

Students in the Applied Portfolio Management Program are expanding their resumes by competing in another investment competition and gaining valuable real world experience.

The CFA Institute Research Challenge was introduced to a global audience in 2006 and is considered, “the investment Olympics” for university students.  The event which hosted more than 3,000 students from over 650 universities, 89 businesses, and 106 societies in 55 countries and territories.  This challenge is an annual global competition which provides hands-on mentoring and intensive training in financial analysis and professional ethics.  Despite 2013 being the first year they competed in this challenge, our finance and economics students were able to advance to the global final of the event.

By compiling the highest combined report and presentation score and winning the regional competition, Michigan Tech qualified for global final.  “As a team we set aside many hours of our time to research, compile, analyze, prepare, rehearse, and finally present our findings to a panel of judges. The true amount of work this project entailed is staggering, however we are thankful for the opportunity afforded to us,” said senior Finance major, Justin Wilson.   Joining Justin to represent Michigan Tech was fellow Finance major Jessica Zaiki as well as economics majors Eli Karttunen and Anna Paul.

Each student was tested on their analytic, valuation, report writing and presentation skills and gained real-world experience as they assumed the role of a research analyst.   Upon the team’s return, Jessica Zaiki noted that having the exposure to the CFA institute, investment professionals, and the high caliber of competition at the Americas competition expanded her knowledge of stock analysis and furthered my interest in pursuing a CFA in the future.

The experience was valuable for our students and it is a competition we look forward to having continued participation and success at in the future.  Financial support for the student participation was provided via the James and Dolores Trethewey APMP Professorship.

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Studying Across Cultures: Eli Karttunen

Eli Karttunen, a fourth year economics major studied in Germany during summer of 2012.

Why did you study abroad?

Studying abroad allowed me to see how economics and finance courses are taught from a European perspective. Also, to take classes with foreign professors and students gives you a large networking advantage, as well as the chance to work in multicultural teams, all of which are invaluable experiences for graduate school, as well as later in life. All too often, it seems that economics has the potential of being taught from a politically skewed or nationalistic point of view,so understanding how Germans view different economic theories or events like the European Sovereign Debt Crisis was appealing.

What did you experience?

The first part of the program was a course on German language,culture, and business, which is designed to not only give the US students a working vocabulary and knowledge of German language and grammar, but also to provide insight to German culture and political institutions. Students present on a variety of topics and have to write a paper by the end of the program. I presented on “The German Banking Sector” and “The German Social Security System.”So far, the difference has been that homework and projects aren’t that big in German education. It’s all about the exam grade. In fact, for university classes, you don’t actually register for them here, you just attend the lectures you want, memorize the note packet the professor sends out, and you register for exams and take them. Nothing else is graded.

What was the best part of your trip?

The best part of the trip is simply being in Europe and being able to travel around and experience the culture. So far, we’ve been to Hannover, Hamburg, Amsterdam, Berlin, and Luneburg. With travel plans to Rotenburg, Munich, Heidelberg, and Helsinki the capital of the land of my ancestry in Finland.

Would you study abroad again? Would you go somewhere new or to the same location?

Study abroad is an invaluable experience in many ways: academically,professionally, personally, and socially. You learn of new ideas, new ways of doing things, and meet tons of people you’d otherwise never have known. I definitely would do it again, given the opportunity. Germany is a great place, and I’m sure I’ll return someday, perhaps for work—I’d definitely need to learn more German first—but for sure for vacation some day. But in order to see other places around the globe, I’d probably want to check out somewhere new!

Originally published in Impact, Fall 2012.

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Economics Major Elected USG President

Eli A. Karttunen, USG president, a senior in economics.

New members have been elected to the Executive Board of Undergraduate Student Government (USG)  for one-year appointments.  The School of Business and Economics is proud to announce that one of our own, Economics major Eli Karttuenen, has been elected to serve as president.

2012 USG members and Titles:

* Eli A. Karttunen, president, a senior in economics

* Donnie L. Palmer, vice president, a junior in chemical engineering

* Jennifer M. Zarzecki, secretary, a senior in mechanical engineering

* Abhishek Gupta, treasurer, a senior in civil engineering

As a member of the USG for the past 2 years, Eli has seen many ways in which USG could improve student life on campus by making student’s opinions heard, which is a big reason why he chose to run for president. USG is supposed to be the collective voice of students on campus.  Eli hopes improve the current relationship between students, USG, and the administration during his time as president.

When we asked Eli about his goals as president, he responded “My first priority is to improve the relationship between USG and the students. An organization only has as much influence as its constituents afford, and this is one area USG has been lacking. I know how this organization works and what students need.”

We wish Eli and the rest of the Undergraduate Student Government the best of luck in attaining and surpassing their goals during their appointments!

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Teams Complete and Submit iOMe Challenge Videos

Four teams of Michigan Tech students submitted videos for the iOMe Challenge.

Lecturer in Economics, Emanuel Oliveira, is leading four teams of students in this year’s iOMe Challenge.  Students formed their own teams and were encouraged to include individuals from a broad skill set to include members who have policy expertise and also other with video production skills.  The students are competing for the top prize of $10,000 by completing the contest’s two components of an essay and a video that illustrates the key elements of the essay.  The 2011 challenge question is: Why do people today feel it is much harder to engage in financial saving than earlier generations when, on average, the earlier generations were much poorer than today?  What would you propose as a solution to change and increase saving rates?

After hearing about the challenge in Oliveria’s class last year, junior Eli Karttunen differed the opportunity one year and upon hearing the announcement for the challenge in class this year Karttunen couldn’t resist getting involved.  He chose to compete this year because he saw the challenge as an opportunity to learn more about policy making and offer solutions.  Karttunen noted, “To see other students taking on significant real world problems that will face our generation and coming up with real solutions is inspiring that one day the issues we face today will be corrected through innovative thinking and proactive policy formation.”

Oliveira knows the significance of this project will be beneficial to the students who participate by exposing them to the policy making process.  Oliveira notes, “Fixing the savings rate crisis in America will take a highly concerted effort and will likely require people to make behavioral adjustments that may cause minor discomfort in order to promote a long run sustainable savings scheme.” This challenge is important and necessary because the more people know about a problem, the more likely it is to get corrected.

Here the videos that have been submitted by Michigan Tech students and the names of the names of the participating students:

Team 1: Cole Nichols, Eli Karttunen, Bryan Endres, Adam Zwiscza

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-cLgX5sFAVI&feature=feedu[/youtube]

Team 2: Rachel Ristau, Jesse Patrick, Thomas Harri, Josh Floyd

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mav7rTMu4pE&NR=1[/youtube]

Team 3: Teddy Broe, Katie O’Connel, Walker Dery, Adam Stigers, Tianlu Shen

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1G5J-p7ktbM[/youtube]

Team 4: Coleman Segal, Genny Gierke

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y_EJiqAI2lo[/youtube]

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