Day: March 6, 2017

Microdevice for Rapid Blood Typing without Reagents and Hematocrit Determination – STTR: Phase II

Laura BrownMichigan Tech Associate Professor Laura Brown (co-PI) and Robert Minerick (PI) of Microdevice Engineering, Inc. were granted a new award funded by the National Science Foundation regarding the broader impact/commercial potential of development of a portable, low cost blood typing and anemia screening device for use in blood donation centers, hospitals, humanitarian efforts and the military.

This device provides the ability to pre-screen donors by blood type and selectively direct the donation process (i.e. plasma, red cells) to reduce blood product waste and better match supply with hospital demand. This portable technology could also be translated to remote geographical locations for disaster relief applications.

The proposed project will advance knowledge across multiple fields including: microfluidics and the use of electric fields to characterize cells to identify the molecular expression on blood cells responsible for ABO-Rh blood type and rapidly measure cell concentration. This project includes the development of software for real time tracking of cell population motion and adapts advanced pattern recognition tools like machine learning and statistical analysis for identification of features and prediction of blood types.


Visualizing a Bright Future for Computer Science Education

Visualization is a process of presenting data and algorithms using graphics and animations to help people understand or see the inner workings. It’s the work of Ching-Kuang “CK” Shene. “It’s very fascinating work,” Shene says. “The goal is to make all hidden facts visible.”

Shene helps students and professionals learn the algorithm—the step-by-step formula—of software through visualization tools.

All 10 of Shene’s National Science Foundation-funded projects center on geometry, computer graphics, and visualization. Together with colleagues from Michigan Tech, he’s transferring the unseen world of visualization into the classroom.

Shene helps students and professionals learn the algorithm—the step-by-step formula—of software through visualization tools. His tools offer a demo mode so teachers can present an animation of the procedure to their class; a practice mode for learners to try an exercise; and a quiz mode to assess mastery of the concept. Tools Shene has implemented at Michigan Tech and the world over include DesignMentor for Bézier, B-Spline, and NURBS curve and surface design; ThreadMentor—visualization for multi-thread execution and synchronization—and CryptoMentor, a set of six tools to visualize cryptographic algorithms.

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Shene and Associate Professor of Computer Science Jean Mayo are collaborating on two new tools—Access Control and VACCS. He hopes his lifetime of visualization work helps advance the field of computer science: “My goal is to visualize everything in computer science.”