Author: karenjoh

Laura Monroe to Speak About High-performance Computing, Tues. Sept. 24

Dr. Laura Monroe

The Department of Mathematical Sciences and the College of Computing will present a lecture on high-performance computing by Dr. Laura Monroe from the Ultrascale Systems Research Center (USRC) at Los Alamos National Laboratory on Tuesday, September 24, from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m., in Fisher Hall, Room 133. The lecture is titled “The Mathematical Analysis of Faults and the Resilience of Applications.” Discussion will follow the lecture, and pizza and refreshments will be served.

Abstract: As the post-Moore’s-Law era advances, faults are expected to increase in number and in complexity on emerging novel devices. This will happen on exascale and post-exascale architectures due to smaller feature sizes, and also on new devices with unusual fault models. Attention to error-correction and resilience will thus be needed in order to use such devices effectively. Known mathematical error-correction methods may not suffice under these conditions, and an ad hoc approach will not cover the cases likely to emerge, so mathematical approaches will be essential. We will discuss the mathematical underpinnings behind such approaches, illustrate with examples, and emphasize the interdisciplinary approaches that combine experimentation, simulation, mathematical theory and applications that will be needed for success.

Dr. Monroe has spent most of her career focused on unconventional approaches to difficult computing problems, specifically researching new technologies to enable better performance as processor-manufacturing techniques reach the limits of the atomic scale, also known as the end of Moore’s Law. Dr. Monroe received her PhD in the theory of error-correcting codes, working with Dr.Vera Pless. She worked at NASA Glenn, then joined Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2000. She has contributed on the design teams on the LANL Cielo and Trinity supercomputers, and originated and leads the Laboratory’s inexact computing project that is meant to address Moore’s Law challenges in a unique way. She also provides mathematical and theoretical support to LANL’s HPC Resilience project.

Download the event flyer


Casting Call: College of Computing Video

Are you a Michigan Tech student? Do you have 30 minutes or more free on Wednesday, September 18? Do you enjoy being in the spotlight? Are you photogenic? Would you like to appear in a Michigan Tech College of Computing video? Please complete this brief form if you would like to participate. Responses are needed by 4:00 pm on Tues., Sept. 17.

Link to Google Form: https://forms.gle/4AdyoQiysMXzsuyo9

Please email Karen Johnson (karenjoh@mtu.edu) if you have any questions.


Tim Havens Quoted in The Enterprise Project Blog

Timothy Havens

Timothy Havens (CC/ICC), the William and Gloria Jackson Associate Professor of Computer Systems and director of the Institute of Computing and Cybersystems (ICC), was quoted extensively in the article “How to make a career switch into AI: 8 tips,” which was published September 5, 2019, on The Enterprisers Project blog.

https://enterprisersproject.com/article/2019/9/ai-career-path-how-make-switch


Bo Chen Receives $250K NSF Award for Mobile PDE Systems Research

Bo Chen, CS

Bo Chen, assistant professor of computer science and member of the Institute of Computing and Cybersystems Center for  Cybersecurity, is the principal investigator on a project that has received a $249,918 research and development grant from the National Science Foundation. The project is entitled, “SaTC: CORE: Small: Collaborative: Hardware-Assisted Plausibly Deniable System for Mobile Devices.” This is a potential three-year project.

Abstract: Mobile computing devices typically use encryption to protect sensitive information. However, traditional encryption systems used in mobile devices cannot defend against an active attacker who can force the mobile device owner to disclose the key used for decrypting the sensitive information. This is particularly of concern to dissident users who are targets of nation states. An example of this would be a human rights worker collecting evidence of untoward activities in a region of oppression or conflict and storing the same in an encrypted form on the mobile device, and then being coerced to disclose the decryption key by an official. Plausibly Deniable Encryption (PDE) has been proposed to defend against such adversaries who can coerce users into revealing the encrypted sensitive content. However, existing techniques suffer from several problems when used in flash-memory-based mobile devices, such as weak deniability because of the way read/write/erase operations are handled at the operating systems level and at the flash translation layer, various types of side channel attacks, and computation and power limitations of mobile devices. This project investigates a unique opportunity to develop an efficient (low-overhead) and effective (high-deniability) hardware-assisted PDE scheme on mainstream mobile devices that is robust against a multi snapshot adversary. The project includes significant curriculum development activities and outreach activities to K-12 students.

This project fundamentally advances the mobile PDE systems by leveraging existing hardware features such as flash translation layer (FTL) firmware and TrustZone to achieve a high deniability with a low overhead. Specifically, this project develops a PDE system with capabilities to: 1) defend against snapshot attacks using raw flash memory on mobile devices; and 2) eliminate side-channel attacks that compromise deniability; 3) be scalable to deploy on mainstream mobile devices; and 4) efficiently provide usable functions like fast mode switching. This project also develops novel teaching material on PDE and cybersecurity for K-12 students and the Regional Cybersecurity Education Collaboration (RCEC), a new educational partnership on cybersecurity in Michigan.

Publications related to this research:

[DSN ’18] Bing Chang, Fengwei Zhang, Bo Chen, Yingjiu Li, Wen Tao Zhu, Yangguang Tian, Zhan Wang, and Albert Ching. MobiCeal: Towards Secure and Practical Plausibly Deniable Encryption on Mobile Devices. The 48th IEEE/IFIP International Conference on Dependable Systems and Networks (DSN ’18), June 2018 (Acceptance rate: 28%)
[Cybersecurity ’18] Qionglu Zhang, Shijie Jia, Bing Chang, Bo Chen. Ensuring Data Confidentiality via Plausibly Deniable Encryption and Secure Deletion – A Survey. Cybersecurity (2018) 1: 1.
[ComSec ’18 ] Bing Chang, Yao Cheng, Bo Chen, Fengwei Zhang, Wen Tao Zhu, Yingjiu Li, and Zhan Wang. User-Friendly Deniable Storage for Mobile Devices. Elsevier Computers & Security, vol. 72, pp. 163-174, January 2018
[CCS ’17] Shijie Jia, Luning Xia, Bo Chen, and Peng Liu. DEFTL: Implementing Plausibly Deniable Encryption in Flash Translation Layer. 2017 ACM Conference on Computer and Communications Security (CCS ’17), Dallas, Texas, USA, Oct 30 – Nov 3, 2017 (Acceptance rate: 18%)
[ACSAC ’15] Bing Chang, Zhan Wang, Bo Chen, and Fengwei Zhang. MobiPluto: File System Friendly Deniable Storage for Mobile Devices. 2015 Annual Computer Security Applications Conference (ACSAC ’15), Los Angeles, California, USA, December 2015 (Acceptance rate: 24.4%)
[ISC ’14] Xingjie Yu, Bo Chen, Zhan Wang, Bing Chang, Wen Tao Zhu, and Jiwu Jing. MobiHydra: Pragmatic and Multi-Level Plausibly Deniable Encryption Storage for Mobile Devices. The 17th Information Security Conference (ISC ’14), Hong Kong, China, Oct. 2014

Link to more information about this project: https://snp.cs.mtu.edu/research/index.html#pde


Soner Onder Receives Year One Funding for $1.2M NSF SCALE Project

Soner Onder
Dave Whalley

Soner Onder, professor of computer science, was recently awarded $246,329 for the first year of a four-year NSF grant for his project, “SHF: Medium: Collaborative Research: Statically Controlled Asynchronous Lane Execution (SCALE).” The project is in collaboration with Prof. David Whalley of Florida State University. Michigan Tech is the lead institution in the project, it is expected to total $1.2 million, with Michigan Tech receiving $600,000.

Abstract: Enabling better performing systems benefits applications that span those running on mobile devices to large data applications running on data centers. The efficiency of most applications is still primarily affected by single thread performance. Instruction-level parallelism (ILP) speeds up programs by executing instructions of the program in parallel, with ‘superscalar’ processors achieving maximum performance. At the same time, energy efficiency is a key criteria to keep in mind as such speedup happens, with these two being conflicting criteria in system design. This project develops a Statically Controlled Asynchronous Lane Execution (SCALE) approach that has the potential to meet or exceed the performance of a traditional superscalar processor while approaching the energy efficiency of a very long instruction word (VLIW) processor. As implied by its name, the SCALE approach has the ability to scale to different types and levels of parallelism. The toolset and designs developed in this project will be available as open-source and will also have an impact on both education and research. The SCALE architectural and compiler techniques will be included in undergraduate and graduate curricula.

The SCALE approach supports separate asynchronous execution lanes where dependencies between instructions in different lanes are statically identified by the compiler to provide inter-lane synchronization. Providing distinct lanes of instructions allows the compiler to generate code for different modes of execution to adapt to the type of parallelism that is available at each point within an application. These execution modes include explicit packaging of parallel instructions, parallel and pipelined execution of loop iterations, single program multiple data (SPMD) execution, and independent multi-threading.

This award reflects NSF’s statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation’s intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

https://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=1901005&HistoricalAwards=false


Blue Marble Security Enterprise Info Session, Thurs., Sept. 12, 7 pm

Blue Marble Security Enterprise will be having an information session focusing on people who know how to or would like more experience with coding as well as people interested in Business. 

We currently have three projects that could use more brainpower for coding, below. If any of these projects sound interesting, please come to our information session at 7:00 pm in DOW 642 on Thursday 9/12.

View the Blue Marble Security Enterprise website: https://bluemarblesecurity.eit.mtu.edu/pages/teams.php.

Arcelor Mittal

Project Information

  • Predictive Failure of Steel Galvanizing Line.
  • Code analysis of Big Data produced by a galvanized steel production line to predict future down time.

Completed Work

  • Signal Elimination Tool – narrows down a large group of time varying signals using simple slope analysis and Dynamic Time Warping.
  • Research into different prediction methods

This semester

  • Obtain information on SET output signals
  • Research and implement predictive software

Majors

  • CpE, CS, Software Engineering
Autobot

Project Information

  • Build an autonomous robot that competes in
    the Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC).

  • Objectives include avoiding obstacles, GPS
    navigation, and staying within painted lines

Completed Work

  • Mechanical and electrical design and construction

  • Planned out new software design framework

This semester

  • Follow the plan for software design

  • Work out any remaining bugs in the code

Majors

  • Software, CpE, CS

 
Cost Effective Vision Pickpoint System- GM

Project Information

  • Sponsored by General Motors

  • Originally 1 Year Project (Completed Last Semester)

  • Create a more cost effective computer vision system than GM’s current Matrox Smart Cameras

  • Design for a manufacturing environment

Completed Work

  • Researched and purchased cameras for stereo vision setup

  • Used machine learning to train a neural network to identify our test objects

  • All programming done in Python

Majors

  • CS, CpE

There are other projects for all majors of interest! Our Outreach Project is our up and coming group. The team will be creating projects for high school students to partake in, to show how great Michigan Tech is! We need folks interested in business as well as anyone wanting to help recruit for our amazing college!
 
If any of these projects sound interesting, please come to our information session at 7:00 pm in DOW 642 on Thursday 9/12.
 
If you have any questions or cannot attend but are interested in learning more, Please feel free to contact me at hpgetsch@mtu.edu.
 
Thank you,

Hannah Getschman

Michigan Technological University

BS Mechanical Engineering

-Minor Manufacturing Engineering

Alpha Sigma Tau National Sorority – Beta Xi Chapter

Blue Marble Security Enterprise

President

– Project Engineer

hpgetsch@mtu.edu


Meet and Greet with Dean Minerick, Weds., Sept. 18, 3-5 pm

Attention all College of Computing Students!

Please join Dean Minerick and College of Computing faculty and staff on Weds., Sept. 18, from 3-5 pm on the patio outside the Library Cafe, for a casual meet and greet and build-your-own-sundae ice cream social.

Ten College of Computing t-shirts will be raffled (you must be present to win), and CC laptop stickers will be given away. Hope to see you there!

View/download the Ice Cream Social Flyer


Robotic Systems Enterprise Info Session, Weds., Sept. 11, 7 pm

Prometheus Borealis Self-driving Car

Robotic Systems Enterprise (RSE) is recruiting CS and Software Engineering students of all years. Our projects involve self driving software development and robot hardware development. If you are interested, come down to our information session tonight! Jon Gohl from GM will be speaking about GM’s vision of self driving cars with a reception afterwards for those that wish to learn about RSE and GM.

Where: EERC 214
When: 7PM Wednesday, September 11th, 2019
Check us out at

Dean Kamen Presentation Is Thurs., Sept. 12, 3 pm

Dean Kamen, President of DEKA and founder of FIRST® Robotics, will give a presentation on Thursday, September 12, at 3:00 p.m., in the Opie Reading Room of the Library.

RSVP

3-3:30 pm Dean Kamen presentation

3:30-4 pm Mingle/chat with Dean and the DEKA Talent Acquisition Team

Opie Van Pelt Library, Opie Reading Room

SPECIAL NOTE TO STUDENTS: Can’t make the first session due to your class or work schedule? Please feel free to come to the second session—or vice versa.

MORE ABOUT DEAN KAMEN

Dean Kamen holds 440 US and foreign patents, including the Segway, the self-balancing personal transporter, and the first-ever drug infusion pump. At the age of 30, Kamen sold his first company, AutoSyringe. He then founded DEKA to focus on innovations aimed to improve lives around the world. It started small and has now grown to a group of over six hundred. Celebrating over 30 years in business, DEKA is a leading R&D company, birthplace of some of the most innovative and life-changing products of our time. Kamen continues to push DEKA to be a place where no idea seems too big and where creativity and crazy cool gizmos reign supreme.

Curious to learn more about DEKA? Check out DEKA’S website. Follow DEKA on LinkedIn!


DEKA R+D on Campus Thurs., Sept. 12

DEKA Research & Development is coming to campus at Michigan Tech! Please join us at DEKA’s special recruiting info session for engineering and computing students. Both events will take place on Thursday, September 12.

Interested in career opportunities with DEKA? Be sure to bring your resume!

DEKA Special Recruiting Info Session, with pizza lunch

Meet DEKA’s Talent Acquisition Team

RSVP

12:15-1:15 pm

Memorial Union Building, Ballroom A

Meet Dean Kamen, President of DEKA and founder of FIRST® Robotics.

RSVP

3-3:30 pm Dean Kamen presentation

3:30-4 pm Mingle/chat with Dean and the DEKA Talent Acquisition Team

Opie Van Pelt Library, Opie Reading Room

SPECIAL NOTE TO STUDENTS: Can’t make the first session due to your class or work schedule? Please feel free to come to the second session—or vice versa.

MORE ABOUT DEAN KAMEN

Dean Kamen holds 440 US and foreign patents, including the Segway, the self-balancing personal transporter, and the first-ever drug infusion pump. At the age of 30, Kamen sold his first company, AutoSyringe. He then founded DEKA to focus on innovations aimed to improve lives around the world. It started small and has now grown to a group of over six hundred. Celebrating over 30 years in business, DEKA is a leading R&D company, birthplace of some of the most innovative and life-changing products of our time. Kamen continues to push DEKA to be a place where no idea seems too big and where creativity and crazy cool gizmos reign supreme.

Curious to learn more about DEKA? Check out DEKA’S website. Follow DEKA on LinkedIn!