Category: Seminars

Nathir Rawashdeh To Present Talk Fri., Dec. 6

Nathir Rawashdeh

Nathir Rawashdeh, College of Computing Assistant Professor of Mechatronics, Electrical, and Robotics Engineering Technology, will present a talk this Friday, December 6, from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m., in Rekhi 214. Rawashdeh will present a review of recent advancements in Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) applications, hardware, and software with a focus on vehicle localization and autonomous navigation. Refreshments will be served.

Abstract: Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGV) are being applied in many scenarios including, indoors, outdoors, and even extraterrestrial. Advancements in hardware and software algorithms reduce their cost and enable the creation of complete UGV platforms designed for custom application development, as well as research into new sensors and algorithms.

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Algorithmic Culture Series Lecture: Artificial UnIntelligence Is Dec. 5

Meredith Broussard

The Institute for Policy, Ethics, and Culture’s Algorithmic Culture series continues with “Artificial UnIntelligence,” a keynote lecture from Meredith Broussard, at 7 p.m. Thursday (Dec. 5) in Memorial Union Building Ballroom B, followed by a Q&A.

Collective enthusiasm for applying computer technology to every aspect of life has resulted in a vast number of poorly designed systems. We are so eager to do everything digitally—hiring, driving, paying bills, even choosing romantic partners—that we have stopped demanding our technology actually work.

In this talk, author and professor Meredith Broussard looks at the inner workings and outer limits of technology, and explains why we should never assume that computers always get things right. Making a case against technochauvinism—the belief that technology is always the solution—Broussard looks at whether self-driving cars really work and why social problems persist in every digital Utopia. If we understand the limits of what we can do with technology, Broussard tells us, we can make better choices about what we should do with it to make the world better for everyone.

Meredith Broussard is an associate professor at the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute of New York University and the author of Artificial Unintelligence: How Computers Misunderstand the World. Her research focuses on artificial intelligence in investigative reporting, with a particular interest in using data analysis for social good. You can follow her on Twitter @merbroussard or contact her via meredithbroussard.com.

Learn more about the Institute for Policy, Ethics, and Culture here: https://www.mtu.edu/ipec/

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Tomorrow Needs Faculty and Scientist Seminar Series

Tomorrow Needs Seminar Flyer

A seminar series to bring advanced PhD students and postdoctoral scholars to Michigan Tech has been launched by the Institute of Computing and Cybersystems, in partnership with the College of Computing, the College of Engineering, and the Great Lakes Research Center. The Tomorrow Needs Faculty and Scientist Seminar Series is intended to build connections with up-and-coming researchers, recruit and retain top talent at Michigan Tech, and provide opportunities for these promising scholars to learn more about Michigan Tech and the University’s excellent resources for research and education.

Those selected will be invited to present a research seminar, tour the Michigan Tech  campus and research facilities, and meet with faculty and students.

Applications to nominate scholars from around the globe are sought from all areas of the university. Nominations of advanced PhD candidates and postdoctoral scholars currently at Michigan Tech are also encouraged.  Find the online nomination form at  mtu.edu/icc/seminars. In the near term, applications will be reviewed as they are received, with a more formal review process to be instituted in the near future.

“Recruiting and retaining talented faculty and researchers is essential for Michigan Tech as we pursue the growth strategies identified by Tech Forward and the University’s leadership team,” says Adrienne Minerick, dean of the College of Computing. “We have an abundance of excellent teaching and creative research at Michigan Tech that complements a terrific quality of life here in the Upper Peninsula. This seminar series will showcase our top-notch people, facilities, teaching and research support infrastructure, and the Houghton/Hancock area to talented new PhDs and post doctoral researchers.”

Tim Havens, the William and Gloria Jackson Associate Professor of Computer Systems and director of the ICC, stresses that the seminar series is open to all University areas. “The need to attract and retain top-tier faculty and researchers is a challenge shared across campus. We welcome nominations from all units. We are also very open to adding new partners to this initiative.”

Download the Seminar Series flyer.

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Weihua Zhou to Present Friday Seminar Talk

Weihua Zhou

The College of Computing (CC) will present a Friday Seminar Talk on November 15, at 3:00 p.m. in Rekhi 214. Featured this week is Weihua Zhou, assistant professor of Health Informatics. He will present his research titled: “Information retrieval and knowledge discovery from cardiovascular images to improve the treatment of heart failure.” Refreshments will be provided.

Abstract: More than 5 million Americans live with heart failure, and the annual new incidence is about 670,000. Once diagnosed, around 50% of patients with heart failure will die within 5 years. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is a standard treatment for heart failure. However, based on the current guidelines, 30-40% of patients who have CRT do not benefit from CRT. One of Zhou’s research projects is to improve CRT favorable response by information retrieval and knowledge discovery from clinical records and cardiovascular images. By applying statistical analysis, machine learning, and computer vision to his unique CRT patient database, Zhou has made a number of innovations to select appropriate patients and navigate the real-time surgery. His CRT software toolkit is being validated by 17 hospitals in a large prospective clinical trial.

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Laura Monroe to Speak About High-performance Computing, Tues. Sept. 24

Dr. Laura Monroe

The Department of Mathematical Sciences and the College of Computing will present a lecture on high-performance computing by Dr. Laura Monroe from the Ultrascale Systems Research Center (USRC) at Los Alamos National Laboratory on Tuesday, September 24, from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m., in Fisher Hall, Room 133. The lecture is titled “The Mathematical Analysis of Faults and the Resilience of Applications.” Discussion will follow the lecture, and pizza and refreshments will be served.

Abstract: As the post-Moore’s-Law era advances, faults are expected to increase in number and in complexity on emerging novel devices. This will happen on exascale and post-exascale architectures due to smaller feature sizes, and also on new devices with unusual fault models. Attention to error-correction and resilience will thus be needed in order to use such devices effectively. Known mathematical error-correction methods may not suffice under these conditions, and an ad hoc approach will not cover the cases likely to emerge, so mathematical approaches will be essential. We will discuss the mathematical underpinnings behind such approaches, illustrate with examples, and emphasize the interdisciplinary approaches that combine experimentation, simulation, mathematical theory and applications that will be needed for success.

Dr. Monroe has spent most of her career focused on unconventional approaches to difficult computing problems, specifically researching new technologies to enable better performance as processor-manufacturing techniques reach the limits of the atomic scale, also known as the end of Moore’s Law. Dr. Monroe received her PhD in the theory of error-correcting codes, working with Dr.Vera Pless. She worked at NASA Glenn, then joined Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2000. She has contributed on the design teams on the LANL Cielo and Trinity supercomputers, and originated and leads the Laboratory’s inexact computing project that is meant to address Moore’s Law challenges in a unique way. She also provides mathematical and theoretical support to LANL’s HPC Resilience project.

Download the event flyer

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US Navy to Present Talks September 17, 3-4 pm

George Anderson and Sally Sutherland of the US Naval Undersea Warfare Center (NUWC)-Newport will present talks on Tuesday, September 17, 2019, from 3:00 to 4:00  pm, in Room 202 of the Michigan Tech Great Lakes Research Center. A reception will follow and refreshments will be served.

George Anderson will present his talk from 3:00 – 3:30 pm. Titled “Classification of Personnel and Vehicle Activity Using a Sensor System With Numerous Array Elements,” Anderson’s talk will  present the performance of a hybrid discriminative/generative classifier using experimental data collected from a scripted field test.

Sally Sutherland, NEEC Director, NAVSEA Headquarters, whose talk is 3:30-4:00 pm, will present, “An Overview of the Naval Engineering Education Consortium (NEEC) Program,” in which she will share information about the Navy’s Naval Engineering Education Consortium (NEEC) program, whose mission is to educate and develop world-class naval engineers and scientists to become part of the Navy’s civilian science and engineering workforce.

One of two divisions of the Naval Undersea Warfare Center, NUWC Division Newport is the Navy’s full-spectrum research, development, test and evaluation, engineering, and fleet support center for submarine warfare systems and many other systems associated with the undersea battlespace. It provides the technical foundation that enables the conceptualization, research, development, fielding, modernization, and maintenance of systems that ensure our Navy’s undersea superiority. The NUWC Division Newport is responsible, cradle to grave, for all aspects of systems under its charter, and is engaged in efforts ranging from participation in fundamental research to the support of evolving operational capabilities in the U.S. Navy fleet. The major thrust of NUWC Division Newport’s activities is in applied research and system development.
This event is sponsored by the Great Lakes Research Center (GLRC) and the Institute of Computing and Cybersystems (ICC).

Please contact Tim Havens (906-487-3115, thavens@mtu,edu) or Andrew Barnard (906-487-2412, arbarnar@mtu.edu) for additional information.Visit the NAVSEA online at: https://www.navsea.navy.mil/Home/Warfare-Centers/NUWC-Newport/ and Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NUWCNewport/

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WEBINAR: Responsible AI: Facial Recognition and Scientific Responsibility

All students, faculty, and staff are invited to join the webinar, “Responsible AI: Facial Recognition and Scientific Responsibility,” Tuesday, September 10, from 12:00 to 1:00 pm, in Fisher Hall, Room 125. Discussion will follow the 30-minute webinar.

The Facebook LIVE webinar is presented by the AAAS Scientific Responsibility, Human Rights & Law Program and sponsored by Hitachi.

Facial recognition is one type of artificial intelligence that is becoming ever more pervasive in our society. It can make our lives easier by accomplishing various tasks such as unlocking smartphones with just a glance, and automatically tagging our friends and family in photos on social media. However, many ethical, legal and human rights concerns exist about facial recognition, from inaccuracies in the technology to its application as a means of general surveillance. Given this, what are the responsibilities of developers and users to ensure facial recognition is transparently, ethically, and justly developed and applied?

Join us for an interview with two leading experts on facial recognition technology who will explore the current capabilities of facial recognition, debunk the myths and explain the realities of its current degree of accuracy, and explore the potential medium and long-term capabilities of the technology. Learn about current efforts to address the ethical, legal and social implications of the technology and consider how these concerns should inform developers and users of the technology.

This is the first in a three-part AAAS series that is sponsored by Hitachi and aims at exploring artificial intelligence technologies, the current capabilities of the technologies, their ethical and policy implications, and the responsibilities of the scientists and engineers developing them. The next interviews in this series will be held on October 8 at 12:00 p.m. and November 12 at 12:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

PARTICIPANTS

Neema Singh Guliani is a senior legislative counsel with the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) Washington Legislative Office, focusing on surveillance, privacy, and national security issues. Prior to joining the ACLU, she worked in the Chief of Staff’s Office at the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, concentrating on national security and civil rights issues.

P. Jonathon Phillips is an Electronic Engineer at the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s (NIST) Information Technology Laboratory. One of the foremost experts on facial recognition, he has published more than 100 peer reviewed papers on facial recognition, computer vision, biometrics, psychology, forensics, statistics, and neuroscience. He is an IEEE Fellow and an International Association of Pattern Recognition (IAPR) Fellow.

Jessica Wyndham (Moderator) is the Director of the AAAS Scientific Responsibility, Human Rights and Law Program. She also serves as coordinator of the AAAS Science and Human Rights Coalition, a network of scientific, engineering, and health associations that recognize the role of science and technology in human rights. Her areas of expertise include the intersections of science, technology, human rights and ethics, the social responsibilities of scientists and engineers, and the role of professional scientific, engineering and health societies in the promotion and protection of human rights.

Find more information here: https://www.aaas.org/programs/scientific-responsibility-human-rights-law

Download the flyer here: Responsible AI Flyer

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ICC Distinguished Lecturer Series Tomorrow

ICC_Jie_wuThe Institute of Computing and Cybersystems (ICC) will host Jie Wu from 3 to 4 p.m. tomorrow (Sept. 22) in Rekhi 214.

He will present a lecture titled “Algorithmic Crowdsourcing and Applications in Big Data.” Refreshments will be served. Wu is director of Center for Networked Computing (CNC) and Laura H. Carnell Professor at Temple University. He served as the associate vice provost for International Affairs and chair in the Department of Computer and Information Sciences at Temple University.

Prior to joining Temple University, he was a program director at the National Science Foundation and was a distinguished professor at Florida Atlantic University. A full bio and abstract can be found online.

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LIVE: Charles Wallace at White House Conference on Aging Monday Afternoon

2015 White House Conference on AgingProf. Charles Wallace was invited to the White House Conference on Aging because of his Breaking Digital Barriers project and the ongoing outreach to research, understand, and help bridge the technology gap experienced by older Americans. Wallace is participating on the Technology and the Future of Aging panel, which begins at 3:50pm July 13, 2015.

There is an official website for the White House Conference on Aging.
http://www.whitehouseconferenceonaging.gov

The conference is being streamed live at:
http://www.whitehouse.gov/live

Online@Library is a joint outreach project between the Michigan Technological University Computer Science Department and the Portage Lake District Library that provides free computer help. These computer help sessions with individual tutors are held every Saturday from 9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. at the library through August. Student volunteers show participants how to use the internet to keep in touch with people, share pictures and letters, find information, solve computer problems, and much more. Tutors help each participant with their own particular needs. People may attend as many of the sessions as they wish, and those who have devices (such as laptops, tablets, phones, cameras, etc.) may bring them. Online@Library is free and everyone is welcome.

More information can be found at the Breaking Digital Barriers website:
http://www.mtu.edu/bdb

Charles Wallace
Charles Wallace, center, attends the White House Conference on Aging.

Financial Engines’ CEO Lawrence Raffone a Panelist at the White House Conference on Aging

The panel addressed Technology and the Future of Aging, and was moderated by Jeff Zients, Director of the National Economic Council and Assistant to the President for Economic Policy. Other panelists included Susannah Fox, Chief Technology Officer of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; Rachel Holt, Regional General Manager, East Coast, at Uber; Tom Parkinson, Senior Vice President & Chief Technology Officer, at Peapod LLC; Charles Wallace, Associate Professor, Computer Science, at Michigan Technological University; and Donna Levin, Co-Founder & VP, Policy, CSR and Global Workplace Solutions, at Care.com. United States Secretary of Labor Tom Perez delivered the closing remarks.

Read More At Investor’s Business Daily: http://news.investors.com/newsfeed-business-wire/071315-141788954-financial-engines-ceo-lawrence-raffone-a-panelist-at-the-white-house-conference-on-aging.aspx#ixzz3fxX0xrdm
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Chuck Wallace Shares How to Break Digital Barriers at White House Conference

“We’re looking at this from the user perspective,” Wallace says. “And we’re hoping to take this from an outreach, educational opportunity to build in more of a research component to better understand what’s happening with these users.”

Read more at Michigan Tech News, by Allison Mills.

Aging Together: Students and seniors breaking down technology barriers

We’ll age out of the technology gap.

I think that’s an unspoken belief around helping seniors overcome technology barriers. Everyone today uses the Internet and owns a device. Barriers will fall as people of all ages get swept into the “cloud” and embrace the “Internet of Things.”

I may have felt the same until talking with Michigan Tech Professor Charles Wallace.

Read more at MLive, by Dustin Block.

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Jeon Presents at International Conference on Auditory Display

ICAD 2015Myounghoon “Philart” Jeon (CLS/CS) and colleagues presented four research projects at the International Conference on Auditory Display (ICAD) in Graz, Austria: “Regulating drivers’ aggressiveness by sonifying emotional data,” “Subjective assessment of in-vehicle auditory warnings for rail grade crossings,” “Exploration of semiotics of new auditory displays: A comparative analysis with visual displays,” and “Cultural differences in preference of auditory emoticons: USA and South Korea.” Jeon also successfully hosted the workshop on “In-vehicle Auditory Interactions” at ICAD. This workshop was partly supported by MTTI.

ICAD 2015 – ICAD in Space: Interactive Spatial Sonification was held July 8-10.

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