Day: August 27, 2009

Better Safe than Sorry: Swine Flu Preparation at Michigan Tech

Tech Today

Over a million Americans contracted swine flu between April and June 2009, most with no serious consequences, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control. But because the illness, caused by the H1N1 virus, is contagious and children and young adults have a higher hospitalization rate than adults (2.1 per 100,000 people for ages 5 to 24), schools and universities across the country are taking precautions in the event of an outbreak.

Here are some of the steps that are being taken at Michigan Tech:

* Hand sanitizer dispensers are being installed at the entrances to computer labs and other high-traffic locations. Everyone is encouraged to wash their hands regularly and have their own sanitizer for regular use.

* A hand washing and hygiene education plan is in place in the residence halls and will be expanded to include the rest of the campus.

* An H1N1 webpage is available with advice to prevent catching the flu, and what to do if you have the flu.

* A swine flu vaccination clinic is planned for fall semester, depending on the availability of the vaccine. It should occur in mid-October.

* As with any contagious illness, students and employees with flu-like symptoms are encouraged to isolate themselves as much as possible, either by staying home or in their residence hall room, until they feel better.

* Supervisors and faculty are being encouraged to be flexible in administering their absenteeism/excuse policy in the event of an outbreak.

The University communicates regularly with the Western Upper Peninsula Health Department and receives weekly updates on swine flu in the area. In addition, the University has a pandemic plan that will be activated in the event of an outbreak of H1N1 or other communicable diseases.

For more information about H1N1 and preparing for swine flu, visit any of the following sites:

CDC
Flu.gov
WHO
MDCH


International Graduate Student Applications Continue to Rise at Michigan Tech

Michigan Tech News

By Jennifer Donovan

August 26, 2009—

Unlike graduate schools nationwide, Michigan Technological University attracted more international graduate students this year than last. Numbers of applicants and accepted graduate students from India and South Korea—which dropped dramatically at graduate schools nationwide—also rose at Michigan Tech.

Last week, the Council of Graduate Schools issued a report showing that nationwide, admissions of international students to graduate schools dropped 3 percent, while admissions of students from India and South Korea dropped 16 percent   Applications for graduate school from international students rose only 4 percent nationwide, a lower rate of growth than in 2008.  Applications from India dropped 12 percent and from South Korea, 9 percent.

At Michigan Tech, applications from international graduate students rose 13 percent and admissions jumped 23 percent. Applications and admissions of graduate students from India and South Korea also rose at Tech.

“This is in part due to the fact that we offer STEM (science technology, engineering and mathematics) plus business, which draw students,” said Graduate School Dean Jacqueline Huntoon.  “It is also because Michigan Tech’s Graduate School staff work hard to recruit students, and the departments are helping out by responding to applications quickly. It’s really a team effort.”

Graduate school applications from US citizens and permanent residents also increased 28 percent from 2008 to 2009 at Michigan Tech. Nationally they also increased, but only by 6 percent. Admissions of US citizens and permanent residents increased 4 percent nationwide this year and 32 percent at Michigan Tech.

“Growing our Graduate School, both in numbers and in quality, is one of the goals in our Strategic Plan,” said President Glenn D. Mroz. “It’s an important way to increase our stature as a technological research university. This is also part of an effort to bring some of the best minds in the world to Michigan. That is critical for Michigan to be a player in the creative economy.”

The Council of Graduate Schools’ report was based on survey data submitted by 253 graduate schools, including Michigan Tech.

Michigan Technological University is a leading public research university, conducting research, developing new technologies and preparing students to create the future for a prosperous and sustainable world. Michigan Tech offers more than 130 undergraduate and graduate degree programs in engineering, forestry and environmental sciences, computing, technology, business and economics, natural and physical sciences, arts, humanities and social sciences.