Category: Funding Opportunities

Opportunities for funding graduate education.

East Asia and Pacific Summer Institutes for U.S. Graduate Students

NSF

The East Asia and Pacific Summer Institutes (EAPSI) provide U.S. graduate students in science and engineering:  1) first-hand research experiences in Australia, China, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, Singapore or Taiwan; 2) an introduction to the science, science policy, and scientific infrastructure of the respective location; and 3) an orientation to the society, culture and language. The primary goals of EAPSI are to introduce students to East Asia and Pacific science and engineering in the context of a research setting, and to help students initiate scientific relationships that will better enable future collaboration with foreign counterparts. All institutes, except Japan, last approximately eight weeks from June to August. Japan lasts approximately ten weeks from June to August (specific dates are available and updated at www.nsf.gov/eapsi).

Ford Foundation Diversity Fellowships

2010 Ford Foundation Diversity Fellowships online applications are NOW LIVE and accepting registrations.

Through its program of Diversity Fellowships, the Ford Foundation seeks to increase the diversity of the nation’s college and university faculties by increasing their ethnic and racial diversity, to maximize the educational benefits of diversity, and to increase the number of professors who can and will use diversity as a resource for enriching the education of all students.

See the Ford Fellowship web site for more information.

2009 & 2010 Environmental Research Grant Announcements

EPA

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), as part of its Science to Achieve Results (STAR) program, is offering Graduate Fellowships for master’s and doctoral level students in environmental fields of study. The deadline is October 22, 2009 at 4:00 PM for receipt of paper applications, and October 22, 2009 at 11:59:59 PM ET for submittal of electronic applications to Grants.gov. Subject to availability of funding, the Agency plans to award approximately 120 new fellowships by June 30, 2010. Master’s level students may receive support for a maximum of two years. Doctoral students may be supported for a maximum of three years, usable over a period of four years. The fellowship program provides up to $37,000 per year of support per fellowship.

For more information visit: http://www.epa.gov/ncer

NSF Awards Tech $4 Million

Tech Today

The National Science Foundation has awarded $4.1 million for eight research projects involving departments across the University.

The research includes sustainable fuel production from lactose; rural and global watershed research and education; using metal organic frameworks for hydrogen storage; high school study of hydrogen-based energy; using electronic and plastic waste to improve the mechanical properties of asphalt materials; developing a better approach to energy control and management; integrating computational models into volcano research; investigation of aerosols in climate models; and improvement of wireless networks.

For the full story, see http://www.mtu.edu/news/stories/2009/september/story19079.html .

Mich Tech, AVL, ESD Provide Free Training for Michigan’s Auto Engineers

See full ESD article for more information

The Engineering Society of Detroit (ESD), Michigan Technological University (MTU), and AVL are reaching out to help Michigan’s automotive engineers prepare for the industry’s movement into sustainable hybrid vehicle technology. The semester-long course, Advanced Propulsion for Hybrid Vehicles with Concentration in Battery Engineering, will be offered this fall.

The graduate-level, three-credit class will focus on engineering skills that apply to next-generation hybrid and electric vehicles with an emphasis on battery design and hands-on learning. The Michigan Department of Energy, Labor and Economic Growth as well as the Michigan Academy for Green Mobility are sponsoring the course.

This course will take place September 3 through December 10, 2009, and be held at ESD’s headquarters in Southfield on Thursdays from 5 p.m. until 8 p.m.  It will be taught by a group of MTU faculty and staff from the College of Engineering and key experts in industry providing guest lectures with Associate Professor Jeffrey D. Nabor being the lead instructor.

Grassroots Development Fellowships

The Inter-American Foundation, a United States government agency that funds grassroots development in Latin America and the Caribbean, announces its 2010-2011 Fellowship cycle.

IAF Fellowships support dissertation research in Latin America and the Caribbean undertaken by students who have advanced to Ph.D. candidacy in a university in the United States.  Fellows must be U.S. citizens or citizens of the independent Latin American countries.  Proficiency in the language(s) appropriate to the research proposal is required.

Awards are based on both development and scholarly criteria.  Proposals should offer a practical orientation to field-based information on the following topics:
•     Organizations promoting grassroots development among the poor;
•     the financial sustainability and independence of such organizations;
•     trends affecting historically excluded groups,i.e., African descendants, indigenous peoples, women, and others;
•     transnational development;
•     the role of corporate social responsibility in grassroots development;
•     the impact of globalization on grassroots development;
•     the impact of grassroots development activities on the quality of life of the poor.

The Fellowship includes:
•     round-trip international transportation to the research site;
•     a research allowance of $3,000;
•     a monthly stipend of $1,500 for up to 12 months;
•     health insurance;
•     expenses related to required attendance at a mid-year conference.

For more information on this exceptional grant opportunity, including application instructions and additional information on the deadline, visit www.iie.org/iaf .

Proposals in Progress

Tech Today

Simon Carn and William Rose (GMES/RSI), “CDI-Type II Proposal: VHub: Collaborative Research: Cyberinfrastructure for Volcano Eruption and Hazards Modeling and Simulation,” NSF, Cyber-Enabled Discovery and Innovation (CDI) Program

Eugene Levin (School of Technology/RSI) and William Helton (Cognitive and Learning Sciences), “CDI-Type I: Multidisciplinary Research: From Geospatial Data to Knowledge,” NSF, CDI

Andrew J. Storer (SFRES/ESC), “Evaluation of Sugar Maple Dieback in Upper Michigan,” GMO Renewable Resources

Judith Perlinger, Noel Urban (CEE/RSI) and Shiliang Wu (GMES/RSI), “Predicting Effects of Climate Change on Atmospheric Loading of Persistent Bioaccumulative Toxicants to the Great Lakes,” Great Lakes Commission

Ulrich H. E. Hansmann (Physics/IEM), “Probing Folding and Assembly of Proteins through High-Performance Computing,” DOE

Elizabeth J. Hager (Biological Sciences), “Role(s) of the Mevalonate Pathway in Embryogenesis,” NIH

David Reed (VPR Office), James Heikinnen (Facilities), Bradley Baltensperger and J. Christopher Brill (Cognitive and Learning Sciences), “Complex Human Systems Research Center,” NIH

Germain Rivard, Joanne Polzien (VPR Office) and Greg Richards (Facilities), “Green Vivarium Expansion at Michigan Tech,” NIH

Patrick Martin (Social Sciences), “Archaeological Monitoring, Wastewater System Improvements, Franklin Township, Quincy Hill Area,” Franklin Township

Claudio Mazzoleni (Physics/RSI), “Analysis of Aerosol Optical Property from Data Collected during ISDAC (Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign), Fairbanks, Alaska, April 2008,” Los Alamos National Laboratory

S. K. Kawatra (Chemical Engineering), “State of the Art Modeling of Steelmaking Raw Materials Production,” American Iron and Steel Institute

Carl Anderson, Leonard Bohmann (College of Engineering), Jeffrey Naber, John Beard and Chris Passerello (ME-EM/APSRC), “An Interdisciplinary Program for Education and Outreach in Transportation Electrification,” DOE

Michele H. Miller, John K. Gershenson, Ibrahim Miskioglu, Gordon G. Parker and Charles H. Margraves (ME-EM), “Fundamental Manner in Which Students Solve Problems,” NSF

J. Y. Hwang and J. W. Drelich (MSE/IMP), “Design and Evaluation of a Novel Process Strategy for Water and Energy Conservation in the Oilsand Processing Industry,” Canadian Oil Sands Network for Research and Development (CONRAD)

Dana Johnson (SBE/SFI), William Endres (ME-EM), James Pickens (SFRES), David Shonnard (Chemical Engineering/SFI) and John Sutherland (ME-EM/SFI), “Development of Supply Systems to Handle and Deliver High Tonnage Biomass Feedstocks for Cellulosic Biofuels Production,” DOE

Terry McNinch (LTAP/TDG MTTI), “City of East Tawas–Sign Data Collection Project,” City of East Tawas, Mich.

Brad King (ME-EM), “Hall Thruster Plume Studies,” Aerophysics Inc.

Victor Busov and Yordan Yordanov (SFRES/BRC), “Role of LOB Domain Transcription Factors in Regulation Wood Formation in Populus,” USDA

Chandrashekhar P. Joshi (SFRES/BRC), “Wood Cell Wall Analysis of Transgenic Poplars Altered in Cellulose Synthesis Genes,” USDA-AFRI: Plant Growth and Development

Abdulnasser Alaraje and Aleksandr Sergeyev (School of Technology), “Developing an Industry-Driven Digital Logic Design Curriculum for Electrical Engineering Technologists” and “Promoting Robotics Education: Curriculum and the State-of-Art Robotics Laboratory Development,” NSF

Jean Mayo and Steven Carr (Computer Science), “Exploring Access Control,” NSF

Ching-Kuang Shene (Computer Science), “The Design of Course Materials and Visualization and Programming Environment for an Undergraduate Cryptography Course,” NSF

Zhanping You, Shu Wei Goh (CEE/MTTI) and Qingli Dai (CEE/ME-EM/MTTI), “Development Guidelines for Warm Mix Asphalt Construction and Maintenance,” MDOT

Devin K. Harris, Jacob Hiller and Yue Li (CEE/MTTI), “Development and Validation of Deterioration Models for Concrete Bridge Decks,” MDOT

Devin K. Harris and Theresa M. Ahlborn (CEE/MTTI), “Evaluation of Constructed, Cast-in-Place (CIP) Piling Properties,” Wisconsin DOT

Rudy L. Luck, Sarah Green, Shiyue Fang and Dario Stacchiola (Chemistry), “Implementing Single Crystal X-Ray Diffraction throughout the Chemistry Undergraduate Curricula at Michigan Tech,” NSF

Zhanping You (CEE/MTTI) and Qingli Dai (CEE/ME-EM/MTTI), “Alternative Materials for Sustainable Transportation” and “Cost Effective and Sustainable Recycled Asphalt Mixtures in Michigan,” MDOT

Amlan Mukherjee, Yogini Deshpande and Jacob Hiller (CEE/MTTI), “Sustainable Recycled Materials for Concrete Pavements,” MDOT

Timothy Colling (LTAP/TDG MTTI), “Impact of Non-Freeway Rumble Strips–Phase 1,” Texas Transportation Institute; and “Cost Effectiveness of the MDOT Preventative Maintenance Program,” Applied Pavement Technology Inc.

Zhanping You, Shu Wei Goh, Julian Mills-Beale and Baron Colbert (CEE/MTTI), “Extending Life of Asphalt Pavements,” MDOT

David Watkins and Veronica Griffis (CEE/MTTI), “Snowmelt Intensity-Duration-Frequency Analysis for Highway Drainage Design,” MDOT

Jacob Hiller (CEE/MTTI), “Extending Life of Concrete Pavements,” MDOT

Timothy Colling (LTAP/TDG MTTI), “Educating the Public to Negotiate Michigan Roundabouts,” MDOT

Nikola Subotic (MTRI), “Comprehensive Infrastructure Reconnaissance (CIR),” Foster-Miller

Andrew J. Storer (SFRES/ESC), “Project Coordinator for the Slow Ash Mortality (SLAM) Project”; “Phloem Reduction in Support of the Slow Ash Mortality (SLAM) Project”; and “Ash Inventory, Trapping and Treatment in Support of the Slow Ash Mortality (SLAM) Project,” USDA Forest Service

Michigan Tech Partners With IBM in Global Rail Innovation Center

Tech Today

by Jennifer Donovan, public relations director

When IBM set its sights on becoming an international rail transportation leader, one of the first university partners they turned to was Michigan Tech. Michigan Tech’s Rail Transportation Program is an emerging player educating future leaders for the rail industry.

Today, as IBM unveils plans for its Global Rail Innovation Center in Beijing, Pasi Lautala, director of the Rail Transportation Program, and graduate student Shane Ferrell will represent Michigan Tech.

“Countries worldwide are recognizing the importance of rail transportation and are accelerating their efforts to develop 21st-century rail systems,” said Lautala. “With its Global Rail Innovation Center, IBM is modeling a new way of thinking, one that is not bound by national borders. Michigan Tech is honored that IBM has recognized our leadership in rail-related research and education and has invited us to participate in such a groundbreaking effort.”

Michigan Tech’s Rail Transportation Program, established in fall 2007 as part of the Michigan Tech Transportation Institute, has attracted strong support from the railroad industry. Its corporate sponsors include CSX, Union Pacific and CN. CN gave Michigan Tech $250,000 this spring to establish the Rail Transportation Education Center, a physical home for the Rail Transportation Program.

The program’s innovative Summer in Finland has already integrated an international component as part of an interdisciplinary approach to rail education, and an initiative to establish a multidisciplinary certificate in rail transportation and engineering is currently in progress.

Michigan Tech joins Massachusetts Institute of Technology Professor Joseph M. Sussman; Judge Quentin L. Kopp, chairman of the California High Speed Rail Authority; the German railroad Deutsche Bahn; Motorola; Railinc Corporation (a subsidiary of the American Association of Railroads) and Sabre (a travel network) as initial members of the new center’s advisory board.

Based at IBM’s China Business Innovation Center, the Global Rail Innovation Center will focus on developing technologies that can increase railroad capacity, efficiency, speed and safety while improving customer service.

“The global demand for rail is outpacing capacity, and today’s aging infrastructure and technology won’t support the transportation needs of the future,” said Keith Dierkx, director of the new center. “Through the Global Rail Innovation Center, IBM is committed to working with our partners to develop and implement smarter rail systems around the world. Railroads are energy efficient and can help cities manage traffic congestion, improve environmental conditions and increase economic competitiveness.”

The rise of high-speed passenger rail and smarter freight rail systems presents an enormous challenge and an opportunity for the information technology and rail industries. IBM already has researchers and consultants working on high-speed rail projects around the world, including Australia, China, France, the Netherlands, Russia, Taiwan and the United Kingdom.

IBM chose Beijing as its rail innovation hub because of China’s rapid advances in rail. In China, investment in railway transportation has tripled over the last year and is expected to reach 600 billion yuan (approximately $88 billion) by 2012.