Tag: Biological Sciences

New theses and dissertations available in the Library

The Graduate School is pleased to announce the following programs have new theses and dissertations available in the J.R. Van Pelt and Opie Library:

  • Biological Sciences
  • Engineering Physics
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Mathematical Sciences
  • Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics

See below for a detailed listing of the new documents available.


Blue Cross Blue Shield Student Award Program

Student Award Program

The annual Student Award Program provides a $3,000 stipend to doctoral and medical students enrolled in Michigan universities to fund a wide range of applied health care research including pilot programs, demonstration and evaluation projects.


NASA NSPIRES Research Opportunities

Supporting research in science and technology is an important part of NASA’s overall mission. NASA solicits this research through the release of various research announcements in a wide range of science and technology disciplines. Please bookmark and visit often  http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external to search for NASA research opportunities that may fit with your graduate research focus.

Current Opening:  NASA Space Technology Research Fellowships (NSTRF)

This Fall 2011 Fellowship opportunity is open to US citizens and permanent residents who are pursuing Master’s or Doctoral degrees in relevant space technology disciplines in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics.   Selected fellows will perform research on their respective campus and at NASA Centers and US Research and Development laboratories.

The maximum amount of an NSTRF award is $60,000 per year for a Master’s candidate and $66,000 per year for a Doctoral candidate – this includes a faculty advisor allowance of $9,000.

If interested, please contact Jodi Lehman (jglehman@mtu.edu).


Professor, Alumni Receive High Honors at International Army Conference

Tech Alumnus Mark Griep, Mechanical Engineering PhD
2008 Tech Alumnus Mark Griep, Mechanical Engineering PhD
A Michigan Tech professor, two alumni and a research colleague have received the US Army’s highest award for research at the Army Science Conference in Orlando, Fla., last week.

The four won the best paper in the nanotechnology division, one of 18 categories, and the prestigious Paul A. Siple Award for the overall outstanding technical paper presented at the conference.

The lead author on the paper is Tech alumnus Mark Griep, who earned a PhD in mechanical engineering in 2008. Griep now works at the Army Research Laboratory at the Aberdeen Proving Grounds in Maryland. The paper was based on research he did at Tech for his PhD and during summer research for the Army.

Griep’s advisor, Professor Craig Friedrich, who holds the Robbins Chair in Sustainable Design and Manufacturing, is a coauthor of the paper. Friedrich is also associate chair and director of graduate studies in the Department of Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics.

Other coauthors include Shashi Karna, a senior scientist at the Army Research Laboratory and a member of the ME-EM External Advisory Board; and alumnus Eric Winder, who earned a PhD in biological sciences in 2010 and is now a postdoctoral fellow at the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest Laboratory near Seattle. Winder was advised by Friedrich and retired professor John Adler.

The paper, which was singled out among more than 800 abstracts submitted, is titled “Nanoscale Bioelectronics for Real-Time Target Sensing.” It describes the integration of biological materials with electronics to create a sensor that could be up to three times more optically sensitive than current technology.  Such systems are envisioned for sensors small enough to be carried by a small projectile fired by a soldier or dropped from an unmanned aerial vehicle to determine the possible presence of chemical or biological materials.  Because protein can activate individual transistors, a small electronic chip containing thousands of transistors could sense multiple toxins.   A real-time, electronics-based biosensor will have a wide array of military and civilian applications, potentially leading to extremely sensitive, small, low-power, stand-alone, sensing arrays.

One potential application: They may also be useful for bio-solar cells.

These award-winning papers were selected for originality of subject matter, relevance to the scientific discipline and the Army, potential impact on current and future soldiers, soundness of scientific methodology, and clarity of the presentation.  The Siple Award recognizes the accomplishments of Army scientists and engineers. It is named after Paul A. Siple, a scientist, intellectual and scientific attaché.  The ASC conference attracted more than 1,500 representatives of government, academia and industry from the US and 25 countries.

For more information about the conference, visit: http://armyscienceconference.com/.

Published in Tech Today.


Research Associateship Programs

The mission of the NRC Research Associateship Programs (RAP) is to promote excellence in scientific and technological research conducted by the U. S. government through the administration of programs offering graduate, postdoctoral, and senior level research opportunities at sponsoring federal laboratories and affiliated institutions.

In these programs, prospective applicants select a research project or projects from among the large group of opportunities listed on this website.  Prior to completing an application, prospective applicants should contact the proposed Research Adviser to assure that funding will be available if their application is recommended by NRC panels.  Once mutual interest is established between a prospective applicant and a Research Adviser, an application is submitted through the NRC WebRap system.  Reviews are conducted four times each year and review results are available approximately 6-8 weeks following the application deadline.

There are four review cycles annually. Deadlines for 2011 are:

February 1

May 1

August 1

November 1

Click here for more information: http://sites.nationalacademies.org/pga/rap/


George L. Disborough Trout Unlimited Research Grant

Scholarship Information

The research grant was established by the Kalamazoo Valley Chapter of Trout Unlimited (KVCTU) for the purpose of recognizing and supporting studies of trout habitat or other projects consistent with the goals and objectives of Trout Unlimited. KVCTU’s goals are to preserve wild rivers, clean up polluted waters, maintain early warning Water Quality Surveillance programs, educate the public through workshops and seminars, and speak for the concerns of all anglers and conservationists.

Eligibility Criteria

The grant will be awarded based on the merit of the proposed project and not on the financial need of the applicant. The project must be consistent with the mission of Trout Unlimited (see below) and take place in North America. The recipient must be a U.S. Citizen or a Permanent Resident Alien and a graduate student at an accredited college or university. Normally, the grant will be for one year. However, it is possible that the grantee may apply again providing the applicant is able to demonstrate the merit of another grant to the Advisory Committee and the Kalamazoo Community Foundation Board of Trustees.

The mission of the Kalamazoo Valley Chapter of Trout Unlimited is to preserve, protect and enhance cold-water resources. The Chapter’s goals are to preserve wild rivers, clean up polluted waters, maintain early warning Water Quality Surveillance programs, educate the public through workshops and seminars and speak for the concerns of all anglers and conservationists. In addition, members of Trout Unlimited monitor pollution and fight environmental abuse, work with state government agencies for better water resource management and work with congress and federal government agencies for the protection and wise management of America’s fishing waters.

Application Requirements

The following must be submitted to the Kalamazoo Community Foundation:

One copy of the application.

One copy of your research grant proposal that includes a description of your research project and addresses the following:

1. The location of your project.
2. The subject of your project.
3. The goal of your project.
4. The method(s) you will use to complete your project.
5. The unique talents or special abilities, if any, that will be required of you in order to complete
this project.

A description of anticipated project costs.

An explanation of why you believe you deserve this research grant.

One letter of recommendation from an individual who supports your application for a research grant.

Award

Varies

Deadline

February 15


Expedition Grants

The Expeditions Council consists of representatives from National Geographic editorial divisions (magazines, television, books, and so on) who review and vote on grant applications and an advisory board of external consultants.

The Expeditions Council is editorially driven; projects must have the potential to yield compelling stories and images. Applications are also judged on the qualifications of applicants and their teams and on the merit and uniqueness of the project.

Major fields of study the Expeditions Council funds:
– Adventure
– Culture
– Mountains/Volcanoes
– Natural History and Conservation
– Underwater Exploration

In addition to financial support, the Expeditions Council offers its grantees the opportunity to work effectively with the National Geographic’s many divisions. Grantees are therefore able to share the results of their expeditions with National Geographic’s global audience.

Eligibility
International applicants are encouraged. However, submissions must be made in English if they are to receive timely consideration by the Expeditions Council.

Applicants are expected to have qualifications and experience pertinent to the expedition or project they propose, and advanced academic degrees are not required. Those planning work in countries other than their own should consider including at least one local collaborator as part of their expedition team.

Grant Amounts
Grants generally range from U.S. $5,000 to $35,000 and are to be used for direct field expenses: transportation, supplies, subsistence, and permit costs as well as other related fees (e.g., interpreters, guides, and porters).

The Expeditions Council does not provide fees for photography, videography, and writing. Such fees are negotiated separately with editorial units.

In order to generate the best story, coverage of the expedition may be assigned to National Geographic photographers, writers, and film crews.

Grant Requirements
Grant recipients must provide a full accounting of their expenditures on completion of the project. They are also required to submit a report summarizing their findings within two months of returning from the field.

National Geographic requires that grant recipients give right of first refusal for coverage to National Geographic magazine, National Geographic Television & Film, and all other publication and broadcast media of the National Geographic Society and its subsidiaries. This right specifically includes books, all other National Geographic Society magazines, lectures, exhibits, our Web site and other electronic media, as well as publicity about the project.

Grant Restrictions
National Geographic Society grants may not be used for indirect costs, overhead, and other expenses not directly related to the project. Fringe benefits are also excluded, as are salaries. Funds may not be used for travel to scientific/professional meetings or conferences, legal actions, land acquisition, endowments, construction of permanent field stations, or publishing research results. Grant recipients are expected to provide the National Geographic Society with rights of first refusal for popular publication of their findings.

Obtaining a Grant
Applying for a grant from the Expeditions Council is a two-step process.

Step 1: Pre-Application
Before receiving an application form, each team leader must submit a pre-application form online. There are a few things you should know before doing so:

  • The pre-application form can be completed in multiple sessions. You will be allowed to save your work and complete it at another time.
  • You will be asked to upload an electronic copy of your curriculum vitae (CV) while completing the form. Instructions will be provided.
  • Please make sure that your browser is configured to receive cookies.
  • This system works best on Internet Explorer 5.5 and Netscape 6.0 or higher.
  • If you have any questions about the online pre-application form, Please email ecouncil@ngs.org.
  • The Expeditions Council accepts pre-applications throughout the year. Please submit your pre-application at least six months before anticipated project dates.

Within eight weeks, the team leader will receive a decision. If the pre-application is approved, the council will send the team leader an email with a link to the full application online.

Fill out pre-application.

Step 2: Application
After receiving an application, the team leader must complete and submit their application online. There are a few things he or she should know before doing so:

  • The Expeditions Council accepts applications throughout the year. However, please allow six months from the receipt of your application for the Expeditions Council to formally review and consider it.
  • Previous National Geographic Society grantees must first comply with all prior reporting and financial-accounting obligations before submitting applications for additional support.
  • We strongly encourage electronic submission of all documents. If this is not possible, please submit your information to the following address:

Expeditions Council
National Geographic Society
1145 17th Street NW
Washington, DC 20036
U.S.A.


Hudson River Graduate Fellowships

HUDSON RIVER FUND GRANTS

The purpose of the Hudson River Foundation is to make science integral to decision-making with regard to the Hudson River and its watershed and to support competent stewardship of this extraordinary resource. The programs of the Hudson River Fund pursue this mission by providing leadership and support for an integrated program of research, monitoring, modeling, synthesis, and education to the management of the resources of the Hudson River.

Under the terms of the Settlement Agreement that established it, the Hudson River Fund is dedicated to supporting

“scientific, ecological, and related public policy research on issues and matters of concern to the Hudson River, its tributaries and its drainage basin, with emphasis given, but not limited to, mitigating fishery impacts caused by power plants, providing information needed to manage the fishery resources of the Hudson River, understanding the factors related to the abundance and structure of fish populations, and gaining knowledge of the Hudson River ecosystem.”

The geographical area of primary interest is the estuarine portion of the River (the mouth of New York Harbor to the Troy Dam, including the waterways and tributaries to the Harbor). However, the Foundation will consider proposals related to any part of the watershed or nearby coastal areas. Such areas are defined as those that either serve as seasonal habitats for biota of the estuary or influence the physical, chemical, or biological characteristics of the estuary in other ways.

Although the central purpose of the Hudson River Fund is to sponsor research in the natural sciences and public policy, the Foundation also assists in the coordination of research concerning the Hudson River system and promotes efforts leading to improved management policies. The Foundation seeks to advance understanding of the issues affecting the River by supporting the dissemination of information gained through Foundation-funded research programs and through other sources. The Foundation sponsors workshops and conferences, bringing together authorities working within the Hudson River Valley and elsewhere to discuss scientific and public policy issues. Reports from these meetings give direction for further scientific work and improve the information used as a basis for public policy decisions.

View the full 2011 Request for Proposals here.


BRC Announces Fall Travel Grants

The Biotechnology Research Center has announced the recipients of its 2010 Fall Travel Grants:

Graduate students

  • Surendar Dhadi (Biological Sciences) will receive $500 toward a podium presentation at the Plant and Animal Genome XIX Conference to be held in San Diego, Calif., in January, 2011.
  • Aytug Gencoglu (Chemical Engineering) will receive $500 toward a podium presentation at the American Institute of Chemical Engineers Annual Conference held in Salt Lake City, Utah, in November, 2010.
  • Seyyed Hessam Mir Shah Ghassemi (ME-EM) will receive $500 toward a podium presentation at the Materials Research Society Fall Meeting to be held in Boston, Mass., in December, 2010.
  • Kaela Leonard (Chemical Engineering) will receive $500 toward a podium presentation at the American Institute of Chemical Engineers Annual Conference held in Salt Lake City, Utah, in November, 2010.
  • Kefeng Li (Biological Sciences) will receive $500 toward a poster presentation at the Plant and Animal Genome XIX Conference to be held in San Diego, Calif., in January, 2011.
  • Sapna Kumari (Mathematical Sciences) received $500 toward a podium presentation at the Genetic Analysis Workshop that was held in Boston, Mass., in October, 2010.
  • Chungja Yang (Chemical Engineering) will receive $500 toward a podium presentation at the American Institute of Chemical Engineers Annual Conference held in Salt Lake City, Utah, in November, 2010.

Undergraduate student

  • Jessica Forrest (BME) received $500 toward a poster presentation at the Biomedical Engineering Society Meeting that was held in Austin, Texas, in October, 2010.

DOD SMART Visit Canceled

Due to a family emergency, Dr. Knox Millsaps needed to cancel his visit to Michigan Tech next week.  He apologizes for any inconvenience and encourages anyone interested in the DOD SMART program to contact him directly (millsaps@nps.edu) with any questions or concerns. 

On Tuesday, October 19th there will still be a general presentation about the SMART scholarship by Jodi Lehman, which faculty, staff, and students are invited to attend.  The luncheon for Wednesday, October 20th has been canceled.  The presentation will be from 12:00-1:00 in the Memorial Union Ballroom B1. 

Jodi is also available to work with students to identify a national lab that fits with SMART applicants’ field of interest and to mentor students in developing a competitive proposal.  She is also available to present and answers questions about the SMART program to classes, departments, and student organizations.   

Again, we apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused and thank you for your interest and support in helping Michigan Tech students understand more about the DOD SMART program.  We also thank those individuals and departments who went above and beyond to provide Dr. Millsaps with a campus visit that highlights Michigan Tech’s unique attributes related to DOD SMART fields. 

The DOD SMART visit will be rescheduled for spring.  Please contact Jodi Lehman (jglehman@mtu.edu) with any questions.