Tag Archives: Environmental and Energy Policy

Dean’s Award for Outstanding Teaching Award – Spring 2018 Recipients

Congratulations! Outstanding Graduate Student Teaching Award Spring 2018 Recipients

Rasmi Adhikari (Biochemistry and Molecular Biology PhD)
Mohammad Alizadeh Fard (Environmental Engineering PhD)
Apurva Baruah (Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics PhD)
Timothy Butler (Biological Sciences MS)
Chethan Ramakrishna Reddy (Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics PhD)
Daniel Crane (Mathematical Sciences PhD)
James Davis (Electrical Engineering MS)
Jennifer Dunn (Environmental and Energy Policy PhD)
Silke Feltz (Rhetoric, Theory, and Culture PhD)
Sanaz Habibi (Chemical Engineering PhD)
Arash Jamali (Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics PhD)
Matthew Kilgas (Integrative Physiology PhD)
Anindya Majumdar (Biomedical Engineering PhD)
Aeshah Khudaysh M Muqri (Physics PhD)
Rohit Sunil Pandhare (Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics PhD)
Sagar Umesh Patil (Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics PhD)
Nishchal Sharma (Electrical Engineering MS)


Congressional Fellowships on Women and Public Policy for 2018

The Women’s Congressional Policy Institute (formerly Women’s Policy, Inc.) has been the home for the Congressional Fellowships on Women and Public Policy since 2014 (formerly the WREI Fellowships). The fellowships are extended each year to a select number of students pursuing a graduate degree or those who have recently completed a master’s, doctorate, or professional degree with a proven commitment to equity for women. Fellows gain practical policymaking experience and graduate credit as they work from January to August in Congressional offices.

The Fellowships are designed to train potential leaders in public policy formation to examine issues from the perspective, experiences, and needs of women. Administered by WCPI, a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization located in Washington, DC, this program is unique—the only graduate level fellowship program on Capitol Hill directly by, for, and about women.

Application materials for the 2018 Class of Fellows are now available! Click the Eligibility and Application tab for more details! The deadline for all application materials is close of business on Thursday, June 1, 2017.


Graduate Student’s VISTA Broadens as She Earns a Degree Through Volunteer Service

A graduate student at Michigan Tech, Rhianna Williams, is earning a master’s degree far from the ivory tower of the classroom. She’s working as a volunteer with the US Office of Surface Mining VISTA program, helping residents of the Uncompahgre Watershed learn about protecting their water resources.

“I joined for the opportunity to practice what I’d learned in the class out in the field,” she says.

Williams conducts watershed education programs in the schools and monthly water sampling for Riverwatch, a group that monitors the river’s conditions along a 10-mile stretch of the Upper Uncompahgre River.

“I’ve enjoyed working with kids,” she says. “We work with local third-grade teachers to take the class out water sampling every month. They were really excited to know that the data they collected would be used to make decisions about their river.”

VISTA, originally Volunteers in Service to America, was founded in 1965 as a national service program designed to fight poverty in the US. In 1993, VISTA was incorporated into the AmeriCorps network of programs.

The OSM/VISTA and Peace Corps Coverdell programs offer graduate students the opportunity to combine academic study with supervised, practical field experience and research. Michigan Tech has partnered with OSM/VISTA programs since 2012

For the full story, see Michigan Tech News.


International Climate Change Policy and Technology Fellowship Program

Now Accepting Applications for MS/MA or PhD Graduates and recent Alumni in Engineering, Physical Sciences, or Public Policy

Application closes midnight EDT, Sunday, June 17, 2012 – visit http://www.orise.orau.gov/ccpt/ to get started NOW!

Opportunity in Washington, D.C. to contribute to a multilateral initiative to promote industrial efficiency in major economies through the Clean Energy Ministerial (www.cleanenergyministerial.org). The Fellowship position would involve frequent interactions with international counterparts and some international travel.

Prior industrial efficiency experience and demonstrated project management skills are both required.  Preferred qualifications include international experience and prior work in energy and/or climate change policy.  Familiarity with energy management is also desirable.

Stipends range from $50,000 to $100,000 depending on academic level, skills and experience.

Additional allowances for medical insurance or transportation may be provided.

Questions?

E-mail Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) at ccpt.fellowship@orise.orau.gov .


Students Tackle Mining Controversy

As they study their fields, graduate science students also need to learn to be good communicators about science. So says the National Science Foundation (NSF).

So Professor Alex Mayer, who has dual appointments in the civil and environmental engineering department and the geological and mining engineering and sciences department, developed a graduate fellowship program–funded by NSF–to help PhD students learn to communicate science to school children and the general public.

This year, PhD students Brenda Bergman, in forest science, and Valoree Gagnon, in environmental and energy policy, chose to develop a news release about the controversy over mining in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and around the nation. Here is their news release:

As mining is resurging in North America, debates across the continent over mines are simplified: “Do we prioritize jobs or the environment? Companies or communities?” These are worthy debates. Yet should the issue of mining really be reduced to “pro-con” statements?

Michigan Tech experts from a wide range of disciplines say no. “The worst type of communication has to do with the simplification of the mining issues. I think the biggest problem is creation of polar opposites so that one has to choose between employment or environmental and health protection” says Carol MacLennan, an environmental anthropologist who has studied mining communities for almost a decade. “Characterizing it that way is very destructive because you’re never forced to confront the complexity of the issue.”

How are members of the general public expected to understand such a complex issue? Answers from Michigan Tech scientists focus on two solutions: education and improved communication between scientists and the public.

According to Craig Waddell, an associate professor of humanities who has studied public participation in environmental disputes, “If you want to prepare a broader range of people to participate, they need to know how to address scientific arguments, how to assess disputes within the scientific community, what counts as evidence and how we evaluate whether or not that evidence is valid.”

MacLennan believes that scientists have an obligation to communicate with the public: “Too often, scientists think about things in terms of ‘furthering knowledge,’ and that, by implication, is a public good. It’s just that it’s often not clear–how is it a public good? How is it publically useful? And you have to always be thinking about different publics–and there are different publics–how are they interested or concerned in the particular work you’re doing?”

For the full story, see Mining.

CBS Detroit and the Great Lakes Innovation and Technology Report also featured the  story about Brenda Bergman and Valoree Gagnon.  See Mining Dispute to view the article.

Published in Tech Today.


Two New Graduate Programs Receive Final Approval

At its regular meeting July 15, the Board gave final approval for Tech to offer two new PhD degrees, one in environmental and energy policy and another in geophysics.

The Board also:

  • Kicked off the public phase of a $200 million capital campaign.
  • Approved the building of a temporary home for the A. E. Seaman Mineral Museum.
  • Approved the purchase of a building to be used for education efforts related to hybrid electric automotive technologies and the Keweenaw Research Center.
  • Awarded the late Jacob R. Oswald an honorary posthumous Bachelor of Science degree in Forestry.
  • Named a mechanical engineering research facility on Ethel Avenue in Hancock the Alternative Energy Research Building.
  • Authorized the University to proceed with construction of the Great Lakes Research Center on the waterfront at Michigan Tech.

Read more news on the Board of Control meeting.