Tag: Finishing Fellowship

Doctoral Finishing Fellowship Spring 2021 Recipient – Pegah Kord Forooshani

I joined Dr. Bruce Lee’s lab in the Department of Biomedical Engineering in Fall 2016, where we focused on designing biomimetic materials for different biomedical applications. The overall objective of my research is to manipulate a unique reduction-oxidation chemistry found in mussel adhesive proteins to create novel biomimetic model systems for robust antibacterial activity and enhanced wound healing. Specifically, I have been developing biomimetic hydrogel/microgels which can be activated to release Reactive Oxygen Species such as hydroxyl radical (OH) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). OH is an extremely potent oxidizer which, unlike H2O2, no known enzyme can detoxify it in the bacteria cells, leading to fast and efficient antibacterial activities. H2O2 is a mild oxidizer, which effectively functions as a broad-spectrum biocide and disinfectant in many biomedical applications. The introduction of a relatively high concentration of H2O2 is antimicrobial and a relatively lower concentration promoted wound healing. We are anticipating that our H2O2-releasing hydrogels can serve as a simple and inexpensive approach for the treatment of healing-impaired wounds such as diabetic foot ulcers.

I would like to thank Dr. Lee for his valuable guidance and support. I am also incredibly grateful to the Graduate Dean Awards Advisory Panel and the Graduate School for awarding me Finishing Fellowship. This will allow me to concentrate on my research and complete my doctoral project in Spring 2021.


Doctoral Finishing Fellowship Spring 2021 Recipient – Rashi Yadav

Doctoral Finishing fellowship

There are a number of aspects in my life that inspired me to be a scientist. I grew up in Chandimandir Cantt, India and as a young girl, I wanted to be an army officer. I remember being awestruck whenever I would see soldiers as they worked relentlessly to protect people and I would think how fulfilling that would be. As I reached high school, I found myself appreciating various scientists that have contributed in revolutionizing the whole world. A scientist can defeat a microorganism capable of wiping out the human population. That is just incredible! That’s why I tell everyone that I am extremely proud of my work line as our unceasing efforts will eventually benefit the society and that is my key motivation which is extremely fulfilling. I am so glad that I am close to my 12 years long dream of getting a Ph.D.

I am very fortunate that I worked with Dr. Ebenezer Tumban, who guided me to conduct professional and analytical research and also taught me several aspects of life by setting up a great example by his deeds. I have done multiple projects under his guidance including assessing MS2-L2 based virus-like particles (VLPs) against Human Papillomavirus (HPV) associated with genital and oral cancer. In addition to this, I have worked on development of a novel thermostable bacteriophage VLP platform-based vaccine.

My experience of pursuing Ph.D. at Michigan Technological University has been incredible. It has been a life-time experience; MTU has the most beautiful summer and winter, though sometimes I have seen extreme winter. But, I must say it is absolutely worth it. I got several opportunities to participate in competitions at MTU and have won awards such as 3-minute thesis, summer fellowship, finishing fellowship etc.  When I am not doing research, I like to spend my time exploring places, going for a hike, painting and dancing.

I am so grateful to Graduate school, MTU for awarding me this prestigious doctoral finishing fellowship. I am so elated and thankful to the people who have supported me in my journey.


Doctoral Finishing Fellowship Spring 2021 Recipient – Ande Myers

I began my Ph.D. in 2017 and currently work with Dr. Tara L Bal in the College of Forest Resources and Environmental Science. My research explores propagation and restoration planting of American beech trees resistant to beech bark disease. I am collaborating with scientists at the National Park Service (Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore and Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshores) to enact an applied restoration project for the mitigation of Beech Bark Disease in Michigan. 

Over the first three years of my doctoral work, I have established a tree grafting program in the CFRES facilities, described the severity of Beech Bark Disease in two National parks, prepared a literature review and synthesis regarding the propagation of American beech, forged a working partnership with the US Forest Service Oconto River Seed Orchard, established a plan for restoration plantings in conjunction with the National Park Service, and initiated a study in methods for transplanting wild-origin American beech seedlings.

My broader research interests are in understanding the dynamics of forest disease and dysfunction and applying a diverse suite of techniques to mitigate the effects of disease and enhance forest health. I aim to present the findings of my research in a clear and understandable manner to a diverse array of audiences. I work to enhance my science communication skills through written and oral presentations, and through forging meaningful working partnerships with external agencies.

I would like to extend my sincere thanks to the graduate school for supporting the finalization of my dissertation through the award of the finishing fellowship scholarship. I also thank the faculty and support staff of the College of Forest Resources and Environmental Science for creating a supportive community that has encouraged my scholarship at every stage of my degree program. Finally, the community of graduate students in the college, and Michigan Tech at large, have provided an amazing academic environment for continued personal and professional growth. I feel that my ability to perform as a researcher has been greatly benefitted by these combined communities, and they have earned my sincere gratitude.


Doctoral Finishing Fellowship Spring 2021 Recipient – Subin Thomas

I joined Michigan Tech in the Fall of 2016 to pursue my Ph.D. in Atmospheric Sciences. My research at Tech focused on the development of a numerical model to study the processes in the Michigan Tech Cloud Chamber advised by Dr. Raymond A. Shaw. Being part of the cloud chamber group, I experienced the synergy between theory, experiments, and numerical simulations first hand. These experiences have helped us as a group to understand the complexities and subtleties of a seemingly simple system and we have communicated these findings to the larger audience through conferences and publications. These expeditions were only been possible because of the collaboration with an open-minded approach to problems by the past and current group members of the cloud chamber group. Furthermore, during this short period of time – I had the opportunity to work with the scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Brookhaven National Laboratory on different but related projects to my thesis for extended periods.
Furthermore, my experience at Michigan Tech has been enhanced by the support from Dr. Ravindra Pandey (the Department Chair of Physics), the office staff (of Physics, of Atmospheric Science, of IPS), my colleagues and friends across the campus. Finally, I am grateful to the Graduate school for their support through a Doctoral Finishing Fellowship, which will allow me to finish writing my dissertation and research publications.


Doctoral Finishing Fellowship Fall 2020 Recipient – Chandan Kumar

I started my journey to my Ph.D. at Michigan Tech in the Department of Geological and Mining Engineering and Sciences in Spring 2018 under the supervision of Dr. Snehamoy Chatterjee and Dr. Thomas Oommen.

The sustainable exploration of mineral resources plays a significant role in the economic development of any nation. My research aims to develop innovative spectral and machine learning methods for mineral and lithological mapping using multi-sensor datasets. The developed methods in this study should be a valuable contribution to the field of geological exploration. The part of my research was funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (grant number: 80NSSC17K0543) grant available with my guides.  

I have published three research papers from my Ph.D. research work in reputed peer-reviewed journals, including the  International Journal of Remote Sensing (Taylor and Francis) and the International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation (Elsevier). I have also presented my research findings at several recognized meetings, including the AGU and AEG annual meeting in 2018 and 2019. I have also received a few awards and travel grants, such as the project proposal incentive award (Michigan Tech) in 2019 to write a research proposal, GSG travel grant in 2018 and 2019. 

I express my sincere gratitude to the graduate school for awarding me the fall 2020 finishing fellowship. Finally, I would like to thank my guides for their continuous encouragement, motivation, and support throughout my Ph.D. 


Doctoral Finishing Fellowship Spring 2021 Recipient – Mujeeb Shittu

I joined Michigan Tech University in Spring 2017 as a Ph.D. student in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology program. I earned a Bachelor’s degree in Medical Laboratory Science at Ladoke Akintola University of Technology and a master’s degree in Cell Biology and Genetics at the University of Lagos.
My doctoral research in Dr. Thomas Werner’s lab focuses on answering one of the most pertinent questions in evolutionary biology – How do animals develop their color patterns? My overall goal is to understand how animals develop their color patterns and discover the regulatory pathways involved in complex color pattern formation in animals. I am using the fruit flies in the quinaria group species (D. guttifera, D. deflecta, D. palustris, D. subpalutris, D.recens, and D. quinaria) as the model to unravel the process of color patterns development in animals. This research will help the scientific community understand the genetic mechanisms that coordinate the assembly of complex color patterns in animal species. It will also benefit cancer research because the toolkit genes that we have identified as pigmentation genes in fruit flies are known human proto-oncogenes; that is, they can cause cancer in humans if misregulated.
My profound gratitude goes to the Michigan Tech Graduate School for the invaluable opportunity to award me the Doctoral finishing fellowship. I am highly grateful to the National Institute of Health (NIH) for providing me financial support for 2.5 years. I especially want to thank my advisor Dr. Werner and my committee members (Prof. Joshi, Dr. Techtmann, and Dr. Hairong Wei), for their excellent guidance throughout my research.


Doctoral Finishing Fellowship Spring 2021 Recipient – Zhuo Xu

I joined Michigan Tech in Fall 2015 as a master’s student after receiving my B.S. in automobile engineering from Tongji University, Shanghai in Summer. After I got my degree in Spring 2017, Dr. Ezra Bar-Ziv offered me the opportunity to pursue a Ph.D. 

Solid waste generation is increasing around the world, and most of these wastes were landfilled since they are not feasible for recycling for various reasons. With the guidance of Dr. Bar-Ziv, my research focuses on the fundamental studies of waste valorization through thermal treatment. I have investigated the thermal degradation of paper wastes, plastic waste, and eliminating hazardous materials from the wastes. Currently, I am devoting myself to explore the synergistic effects between paper and plastic wastes. The studies would help design the process parameters for the thermal treatment of wastes and provide alternatives to landfills. It would help achieve the circular economy

I am grateful to Michigan Tech’s grad school for the financial support through the finishing fellowship. This would help me focus on completing my degree.


Doctoral Finishing Fellowship Spring 2021 Recipient – Mikhail Trought

I obtained my Bachelor of Arts degree in Chemistry at Lawrence University, Appleton Wisconsin in June 2016 and started my graduate studies at Michigan Technological University in September 2016. Currently, I am a PhD. candidate in Dr. Kathryn A. Perrine’s research group in the Chemistry Department. The research projects that I have focused on involves investigating the influence of functionalization and surface morphology on the growth of metal oxide nanostructures deposited on 2D model substrates using atomic layer deposition, which can directly assist in designing and creating next-generation semiconductors and heterogeneous catalysts. Additionally, we investigate surface reactions of earth-abundant metal/metal oxide surfaces at ultra-high vacuum pressures to ambient pressure conditions. Performing our experiments at the ambient pressure regime allows us to bridge the knowledge gap between surface reactions occurring at low (ultra-high vacuum) and high pressures. We also, incorporate a myriad of Atomic force microscopy techniques to investigate topography, hydrophilicity and insitu surface reactions.
I would like to sincerely thank the Graduate Dean Awards Advisory Panel and the Graduate School for providing me with the Finishing Fellowship award. This will allow me to focus on writing and defending my dissertation in Spring 2021.


Doctoral Finishing Fellowship Spring 2021 Recipient – Joe Shannon

I am excited to have the opportunity of a finishing fellowship to complete my research. I am interested in using site-level ecohydrology research to estimate watershed-scale impacts with the goal of providing results that can guide land managers and policymakers. My current research is a combination of modeling future conditions and mapping wetland distribution. These projects build on the 10 years I have spent studying the impact of emerald ash borer on black ash wetlands. Using a combination of optical imagery and synthetic aperture radar, I am working to quantify the distribution of these relatively unmapped wetlands. Mapping these wetlands is the first step to mitigating the effects of EAB, which will require long-term management strategies. To guide climate-adapted management tactics, I am also modeling the combined impacts of EAB and climate change. Using wetland models, I simulate how mitigated and impacted wetlands will respond to changing temperature and precipitation patterns.

Specifically, how will wetland inundation patterns change, and what impacts will those changes have on other ecosystem components. With the knowledge of where these wetlands are located and how they will change in the future, better decisions can be made to retain their benefits.

Joe Shannon

Research Scientist & PhD Candidate

School of Forest Resources and Environmental Sciences Michigan Technological University


Doctoral Finishing Fellowship Spring 2021 Recipient – Saeid Jamilan

I am a Ph.D. candidate in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department. From the beginning of my Ph.D. program at Michigan Tech, I started to perform research on developing novel electromagnetic and photonic devices. They include invisibility cloaks, collimators, and metasurfaces formed from low-loss all-dielectric photonic crystals and resonators. I performed theoretical calculations and analysis involving Maxwell’s equations, Transformation Optics, and Mie theories. In addition, I conducted numerical simulations and experimental measurements. This led to achieving promising results that appeared in publications, already cited by well-known research groups from different countries. These results allow for developing advanced applications in shielding the objects from harmful irradiations, sensing, imaging, holography, communications, and medicine. I also had opportunities to improve my teaching skills as a graduate teaching assistant for four semesters. Furthermore, I have frequently served as a reviewer for high-impact scientific journals during recent years.

I would like to thank the Graduate School, Graduate Dean Awards Advisory Panel, and dean for awarding me a Finishing Fellowship that allows me to finish my research. I am also grateful to my advisor, Dr. Elena Semouchkina, for her continuous guidance and support.