VAKYA Business Model Places in Competition

Karuna Rana and Mayank Bagaria
Karuna Rana (left) and Mayank Bagaria (right) share second and third place awards.

The 2018 Bob Mark Business Model Competition took place Wednesday (Dec. 5, 2018) in the Opie Library. The Competition was hosted by the Innovation Center for Entrepreneurship, a collaboration between Pavlis Honors College, the School of Business and Economics and the Vice President for Research Office.

There were more than 20 participants making up 15 teams from various majors and disciplines who pitched to a panel of judges.

Ideas ranged from hypothermia preventing life jackets to a web-based stress management program. Participants had five minutes to pitch their ideas and present their business model. The judging panel then had time following the presentation to ask questions and provide valuable feedback.

The winners of the 2018 Bob Mark Business Model Competition were:

  • First Place and MTEC SmartZone Game Changer Award – Gary Tropp (Computer Network & System Administration) for VARS (Virtual Advising Registering and Scheduling)
  • Second and Third Place – Tie between Mayank Bagaria (Mechanical Engineering) for Vakya and Karuna Rana (Environmental and Energy Policy) for Reality Check
  • Audience Favorite – Nate LaJoie (Finance) and Michael Betz (Management) for Backpack Keg
  • Honorable Mention – Deanna Springgay (Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) for Little Trainer
  • Honorable Mention – Russ Crofton (Mechanical Engineering Technology) for Modern Steel Bicycles

Congratulations to all winners and participants, and thanks to the panel of distinguished judges for donating their time and expertise. The Innovation Center for Entrepreneurship would also like to thank MTEC SmartZone and Arroyo Networks for their support and prize contributions. Photos from the event can be viewed and downloaded here.

The Bob Mark Competition is part of Husky Innovate, a series of workshops and competitions that guide students through key phases of business development while emphasizing strategies for success. More information on upcoming Spring Husky Innovate events can be found at mtu.edu/husky-innovate.

By the Innovation Center for Entrepreneurship.

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Tech student teams compete in business

VAKYA Presentation by the speaker
Presentation on the VAKYA business model by Mayank Bagaria.

Bagaria’s proposal was for VAKYA, a set of glasses that would listen to speech and print the text on the lens for the wearer. Bagaria has those with total or partial hearing loss in mind for the first phase, but the second phase could include translation from different languages.

Read more at the Mining Gazette, by Joshua Vissers.


ME-EM is Represented at Noise and Vibration Conference

ISMA 2018 conference sign outsideThree members of the Department of Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics presented at and attended the ISMA-USD Noise and Vibration Engineering conference at KU Leuven in Leuven Belgium. The 28th International Conference on Noise and Vibration engineering (ISMA2018) was organized in conjunction with the 7th International Conference on Uncertainty in Structural Dynamics (USD2018) on September 17-19, 2018. Approximately 700 people (50% from industry, 50% from universities) attended the conference.

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Jon Furlich, PhD student presented “Application of STFT and Wavelet analysis to MT clunk data: a case study.” Andrew Barnard (ME-EM) presented “Active noise control in pipes and ducts using carbon nanotube thermophones” and “Top 10 mechanical experiments for the teaching of sound and vibration in mechanical engineering”. Barnard also taught a seminar on acoustics in London Sept. 20.

  • Furlich, J. E., Blough, J., and Robinette, D. L., ‘Analysis of experimental mt clunk with stft and cwt to observe mode participation and reduction’, Michigan Technological University. ( abstractfull paper )
  • Barnard, A., and Senczyszyn, S., ‘Active noise control in pipes and ducts using carbon nanotube thermophones’, Michigan Technological University. ( abstractfull paper )
  • Peres, M. A., and Barnard, A., ‘Top 10 mechanical experiments for the teaching of sound and vibration in mechanical engineering’, The Modal Shop, Inc.. ( abstractfull paper )

Read more at ISMA Past Editions.

Jason Blough (ME-EM) chaired a session, attended the conference and met with peers to discuss future research topics.


Craig Friedrich Presents at Arthroplasty Conference

ISTA 2018 showing the conference audience and stage.

Craig Friedrich (ME-EM) presented two podium papers, “Enhanced Bone Fixation of TKA Tibial Tray Implants with TiO2 Nanotubes” and “In Vivo Anti-Bacterial Effectiveness of Nanotextured Titanium Implant Surfaces” at the 31st International Society for Technology in Arthroplasty (ISTA) Conference in London, England.

The conference, which addressed innovative solutions for arthroplasty, took place Oct. 10-13, 2018 at the Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre. Established in 1988, ISTA is dedicated to advancing the art and science of technology in joint replacement by connecting the leading clinicians, engineers, researchers, and industry members from around the globe.

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Enhanced Bone Fixation of TKA Tibial Tray Implants With TiO2 Nanotubes

Daniel Justin – Nanovation Partners – Orlando, USA
Young S. Ngyuen – Optimotion Implants, LLC – Orlando, USA
William Walsh – University of New South Wales – Randwick, Australia
Matt Pelletier – Surgical &Orthopaedic Research Laboratory – Sydney, Australia
Craig R. Friedrich – Michigan Technological University – Houghton, USA
Erin Baker – Beaumont Health System – Royal Oak, USA
Sungho Jin – University of California San Diego – San Diego, USA
Clyde Pratt – Kinamed. Inc. – Camarillo, USA

Recent clinical data suggest improvement in the fixation of tibia trays for total knee arthroplasty when the trays are additive manufactured with highly porous bone ingrowth structures.

Read more at ISTA Online.

In Vivo Anti-Bacterial Effectiveness of Nanotextured Titanium Implant Surfaces

Craig R. Friedrich – Michigan Technological University – Houghton, USA
Erin Baker – Beaumont Health System – Royal Oak, USA
Sachin Bhosle – Michigan Technological University – Houghton, USA
Daniel Justin – Nanovation Partners – Orlando, USA

Periprosthetic infection remains a clinical challenge that may lead to revision surgeries, increased spending, disability, and mortality.

Read more at ISTA Online.


Sain and Imam Publish on Composite Materials

Solids and Structures journal coverTrisha Sain (ME-EM) and Muhammed Imam authored the paper “Effects of cohesive interfaces and polymer viscoelasticity on improving mechanical properties in an architectured composite,” in the International Journal of Solids and Structures.

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijsolstr.2018.10.008

Extract

Improving the functionality of composite materials is a key requirement for various aerospace, auto-motive, sports and defense applications. The trend is to identify mechanisms, design, constituents, and, preferably, the combination of all of them that can result into better mechanical properties in the conflicting domain of interest (e.g. high stiffness and high damping or high stiffness and high toughness) without adding much complexity in the analysis and design.

The present work considered an “interconnected” geometry inspired by biological materials in a composite material made of very different material properties. Our computational study showed that the interconnection was effective in improving the load transfer between two dissimilar materials by the virtue of contact-friction mechanism, compared to layered materials.


TARDEC Funding for Professional Development Modules

Jeremy Worm
Jeremy Worm

Jeremy Worm (MEEM/APSRC) is the principal investigator on a project that has received a $47,000 contract from the U.S. Department of Defense-Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC).

Chris Morgan (APSRC) and Jeff Naber (MEEM/APSRC) are Co-PIs on the project “Delivery of Hands-On Professional Development Modules in Diesel Engine Calibration and Powertrain Instrumentation.”

This is a five-month project.

By Sponsored Programs.


Best Poster by Kishan Bellur

Kishan Bellur
Kishan Bellur

Kishan Bellur, a postdoctoral scholar (ME-EM), recently attended the annual meeting of the American Society of Gravitational and Space Research (ASGSR) in Bethesda, Maryland. This is now the primary microgravity conference for NASA.

At the conference, Bellur received the award for “Best Poster Presentation.” His poster presentation was based on his dissertation research, which will be extended with the new NASA Physical Sciences Informatics System (PSI) grant.

The meeting took place October 31st, 2018 through November 3rd, 2018.

The members of ASGSR represent academia, government, and industry interests bonded by a common issue – how living organisms and physical systems respond to gravity.

NASA offers the PSI data repository for physical science experiments performed on the International Space Station (ISS). The PSI system is now accessible and open to the public.




Andrew Barnard on Noise Levels at Beaver Stadium

Beaver Stadium showing crowds of people in the stands
Beaver Stadium

Andrew Barnard (MEEM) was referenced in the article “Beaver Stadium can get as loud as a rock concert. How to cheer and protect your ears,” in Centre Daily Times. The story referenced research Barnard conducted as a graduate student at Penn State on noise levels at the university’s Beaver Stadium.

Beaver Stadium can get as loud as a rock concert. How to cheer and protect your ears

In the late 2000s, Andrew Barnard, former Penn State graduate student and current Michigan Technological University professor, measured the sound levels in Beaver stadium during games with sold-out crowds of well over 107,000 people. He measured sound intensity that occasionally reached levels louder than jack hammers. Think about that!

Read more at Centre Daily Times, by Bethany N. Tessitore.


Mo Rastgaar Receives NSF Funding for Robotic Ankle Prosthesis Study

Robotic AnkleMo Rastgaar (MEEM/MuSTI) is the principal investigator on a project that has recieved a $680,182 research and development grant from the National Science Foundation. The project is titled “NRI: INT: COLLAB: Anthropomorphic Robotic Ankle Prosthesis with Programmable Materials.” This is a four-year project.

Extract

There are currently 2 million Americans living with an amputation; the majority of those amputations are of the lower limbs. Leg amputation is a significant life-altering event that has an overwhelmingly negative effect on many aspects of life, even years after the injury. Leg amputation can cost in excess of $1.8 million per individual. Most available prostheses are designed to replicate some aspects of normal ankle function during level-ground walking. These prostheses allow many individuals with below-knee amputation to return to basic daily activities. However, these devices are best suited for level-ground walking and many users experience difficulties during other important tasks, such as walking on slopes, stairs, or different terrains. Therefore, the general aim of this project is to address this gap in the design of existing powered ankle-foot prostheses by enabling new prosthetics that adapt to different environmental conditions commonly found in daily life.

In addition to advancing research, undergraduate and graduate students will be involved in research activities and will receive interdisciplinary education/innovation/outreach experiences. Outreach activities will allow the project team to engage diverse middle and high school students, especially those from underrepresented groups and low-income families. The findings from this project will be disseminated through publications, software sharing, and technology commercialization.

Read more at the National Science Foundation.