Archives—July 2017

Everything from Algae to Zooplankton

Ride the WavesYoung scientists sample the freshwater food chain through GM’s Ride the Waves at Michigan Tech’s Great Lakes Research Center.

Whitefish bellies, lard-filled olives—and a boat ride on Michigan Tech’s 36-foot Research Vessel Agassiz. Just the thing to hook elementary students on science, technology, engineering and math.

Funded by General Motors (GM) since 2013, Ride the Waves gets about 700 students per year out on local waters and into GLRC labs to work side-by-side with Michigan Tech students, staff and faculty. The goal: to better understand the freshwater environment and factors that affect it, from phytoplankton to mining waste.

Read more at Michigan Tech News, by Cyndi Perkins. | VIEW THE PHOTO ALBUM


Teacher Professional Development at Belle Isle Aquarium

Belle Isle Aquarium Outreach
Students at Belle Isle Aquarium

Joan Chadde is in Detroit this week conducting a four-day teacher institute at the Belle Isle Aquarium as part of an National Science Foundation Innovative Technology Experiences for Student and Teachers (ITEST) grant project.

The project’s goal is to increase the interest of diverse students in science and science careers. This summer institute is a collaboration with Wayne State University (Jeff Ram, PI) and the Belle Isle Conservancy.

Learn more about summer institutes for teachers.


Agassiz at Strawberry Festival 2017

AgassizThere were free scientific excursions aboard Michigan Tech’s research vessel Agassiz from 1 to 6 p.m. Saturday, July 8, 2017, during the Strawberry Festival. Excursions departed from the Chassell marina.

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“How do scientists assess the health of Lake Superior” was the focus of the free scientific excursions. The public was invited to sign up for a 30-minute scientific excursion.

On each scientific excursion, Marcel Djkstra, a graduate of Michigan Tech and currently a Great Lakes scientist at the University of Wisconsin, demonstrated the use of sampling equipment to collect data on: water clarity, temperature, and turbidity that tells us about the health of the lake—and Chassell Bay. Participants explored the link between land uses and the health of the Great Lakes.

Remotely-Operated-Vehicle (ROV) demonstrations were also conducted from the Chassell Marina dock by Michigan Tech Great Lakes Research Center researchers throughout the afternoon.

“Copper Country residents and visitors are encouraged to learn how scientists study the Great Lakes and which measurement indicate a healthy lake,” explained Joan Chadde director of the Center for Science and Environmental Outreach, who has coordinated this program as part of Strawberry Festival since 2006.

“These scientific excursions for the public have been extremely popular. Youth and adults enjoy the opportunity to interact with Great Lakes scientists and get their questions answered,” adds Chadde.

The event is coordinated by the Michigan Tech Center for Science and Environmental Outreach and Michigan Tech’s Great Lakes Research Center, and funded by the GM Ride the Waves Program. The GM Ride the Waves Program puts more than 600 Copper Country youth and adults on the water each year to learn about the Great Lakes and Lake Superior and promote STEM careers. Additional financial support is provided by the Michigan Tech Great Lakes Research Center and the Chassell Lions Club.