Category Archives: News

Fall Enrollment at All-Time High for Female Engineering, Minority, International and Graduate Students

Michigan Tech submitted its preliminary fall enrollment figures to the state this week.  Enrollment totaled 7,100 this fall, up from last year and the second highest since 1983.

Female enrollment in the College of Engineering is 1,005, an all-time high at 22 percent.

American minority students totaled 474, nearly 7 percent of the student body and another all-time high.

Graduate School enrollment also hit an all-time high this fall, at 1,442 or 20 percent of the student body.  The Graduate School received 1,800 more applications this year than last.

Michigan Tech’s 1,093 international students represent another all-time high. Retention—the percentage of first-year students who return for their second year—was 85 percent, the highest it has been since 1993.

Read the the full story.

Published in Tech Today by Jennifer Donovan, director of news and media relations

PhD students co-authored paper in Journal of Applied Physics

PhD students Ankit Vora (ECE) and Jephias Gwamuri (MSE) co-authored a paper with Joshua Pearce (MSE/ECE), Paul Bergstrom (ECE) and Durdu Guney (ECE) titled “Multi-resonant Silver Nano-disk Patterned Thin Film Amorphous Silicon Solar Cells For Staebler-Wronski Effect Compensation,” in the “Journal of Applied Physics.”

Published in Tech Today.

International Conversation Partner Opportunity

Conversation Partners is a program that pairs students in the Intensive English as a Second Language (IESL) program with more proficient English speaking members of the Michigan Tech community. The program is open to students, faculty and staff. Participants commit to one hour a week of one-on-one informal conversation by signing a contract with the IESL program for one semester. Volunteers are required to meet their partners in public places on campus for a minimum of one hour a week.

IESL is offering this opportunity again for the fall semester—by volunteering, you can make an enormous difference.

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Michigan Tech Multiliteracies Center offers graduate students writing groups

The Michigan Tech Multiliteracies Center (MTMC) offers graduate students at any level of their degree writing groups to work on projects (planning and writing), proposals, conference papers, posters, presentations and defenses.  These groups are discussion based, allowing students to explain their project to other students and get feedback from peers.

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Middle, High School Students: Sign Up for Free Computer Programming Lessons

The Department of Computer Science is offering local students free, hands-on instruction in the basics of computer programming and computer science.

Starting Sept. 13, Copper Country Programmers meets from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays during the academic year at the Van Pelt and Opie Library.  Computer science faculty and students will teach the fundamentals of programming, starting with simple languages like HTML and BASIC and progressing to the well known and widely used Java language.

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Michigan Tech Approved as Test Site for the Graduate Record Exams

Michigan Tech has been approved as an official test site for the Graduate Record Exam (GRE), an entrance exam required by most graduate programs around the country. This will enable students from this area to take the GRE at Michigan Tech’s Testing Center, part of the Jackson Center for Teaching and Learning.

Previously, Michigan Tech students and locals had to travel four hours or more to take the standardized exam. The closest test sites were Sault Ste. Marie and Duluth, Minn.

“We have been working for years to get approved as a GRE test site,” said Margaret Landsparger, coordinator of the Michigan Tech Testing Center. “Now we have this beautifully equipped center and the capability to administer secure exams, and this time we were approved.”

The Michigan Tech Testing Center opened in October 2013. It is also certified to give Pearson Vue exams, including the popular Fundamentals of Engineering exam and the GMAT, a graduate entrance exam for business schools.

Tech joins 10 other GRE test sites in Michigan. The Testing Center can administer up to 10 tests at a time. The center has four test dates scheduled between now and the end of the year: the first is on Sept. 26, and there will be two in October and one in December.

“I am delighted that the GRE test will be offered at Michigan Tech in the future,” said Jacqueline Huntoon, dean of the Graduate School. “We have all been working on this for a very long time. The hard work done by the Jackson Center staff made it all possible. Staff members in the Graduate School have also been working to educate individuals in leadership positions at GRE, to help them understand the realities of our geographical location.”

For more information, see GRE.

Michigan Tech, Central Michigan University Launch Collaborative Physical Therapy Doctoral Program

With a purposeful pun—“an exercise in partnership”—Bruce Seely, dean of the College of Sciences and Arts, marked the launch Monday of a unique partnership between Central Michigan University (CMU) and Michigan Tech. The program will offer a Doctor of Physical Therapy degree from CMU to students at both campuses.

“This partnership is a signal of Michigan Tech’s commitment to strengthening its education and research initiatives in the life sciences,” said President Glenn Mroz. “We are thrilled to mark the beginning of this cooperative endeavor by dedicating this wonderful space designed for physical therapy education.”

The space, including a technologically cutting-edge remote classroom that will be shared in real time by students at CMU and Tech, is in the Advanced Technology Development Complex. A student lounge there was furnished by a gift from the family of Roy and Ruth Jurva.

A cohort of 12 students is starting the program at Michigan Tech. Another 48 are enrolled on the CMU campus. The Michigan Tech students attended the dedication of their program space, cheering and clapping. Several of their fellow students at CMU attended remotely through a direct video link between the two classrooms.

For the full story, see Michigan Tech News.

Graduate School Dean Elected GRE Board Chair

Jacqueline Huntoon, dean of the Graduate School, has been voted chair-elect of the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) Board. She will take office in October.

“This is a great honor that will help bring more national and international recognition to Michigan Tech and its graduate programs,” said Huntoon.

She has served on the GRE Board since 2012. The board oversees the management and administration of the GRE test, which is part of the application package for most graduate schools in the United States. Other board members include graduate school deans from universities such as Virginia Tech, Northwestern and the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

“It’s been an honor to serve on the board, and I’ve learned a lot about best practices at other graduate schools,” Huntoon said.

Michigan Tech Receives $5 Million from Herbert H. and Grace A. Dow Foundation to Reform Middle-School Science Education

Young children are naturally curious about everything around them. They want to know how and why things work. Then, around middle school age, many of them lose that natural attraction to science and engineering.

A team of university and public school educators in Michigan say they know what’s wrong with middle school science education. And, with a $5 million, three-year grant from the Herbert H. and Grace A. Dow Foundation, they intend to develop and test some solutions.

“In Michigan and most of the nation’s schools, STEM instruction consists of a series of seemingly unrelated courses that require students to memorize large numbers of facts but fail to engage them in the practice of using science as a tool to address real-world problems,” says Jacqueline Huntoon, a geology professor, associate provost and dean of the Graduate School at Michigan Tech.

The Herbert H. and Grace A. Dow Foundation, based in Midland, Mich., has funded the Michigan Science Teaching and Assessment Reform (Mi-STAR) program to develop a model for reforming middle-school STEM education that will include a new curriculum supported by updated teacher education and teacher professional development strategies.

The program focuses on integrating the sciences, using a problem-based approach, cutting across the traditional disciplines of biology, physics, chemistry and earth science to emphasize core ideas and show how science can be used to address society’s needs. For the full story, see Michigan Tech News.