Author: Sue Hill

Invited Review of Multifunctional Biomedical Adhesives

Multifunctional Biomedical Adhesives passive design active design functionsAdvanced Health Materials published the article “Multifunctional Biomedical Adhesives,” by Bruce Lee, Rupak Rajachar, Rattapol Pinnaratip, Saleh Akram Bhuiyan, and Kaylee Meyers (Biomed). This article is an invited review that described recent advances in designing multifunctional bioadhesives for various biomedical applications.

https://doi.org/10.1002/adhm.201801568

This review discusses strategies for engineering multifunctional biomedical adhesives, which involve two general approaches: passive and active design. Passive adhesives contain inherent structural elements that can carry out additional functions without external influences, whereas active adhesives are designed to respond to environmental changes. These adhesives exhibit new functionality such as antimicrobial properties, self‐healing ability, and the capacity to release drugs.

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Wireless Sensor Project Funding for Keat Ghee Ong

Keat Ghee Ong
Keat Ghee Ong

Keat Ghee Ong (BioMed) is the principal investigator on a project that has received a $14,000 research and development grant from the University of Oregon.

The project is titled “Implementation of a Wireless Sensor System for Monitoring Mechanical Loadings at the Internal Fixation Plates of Rats with Segmented Bone Defects.”

This is the first year of a potential three year grant totaling $54,000.

By Sponsored Programs.

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BME Students Place in 2019 World Water Day Poster Competition

Cholera Poster DetailThanks to all who participated in this year’s World Water Day. Thanks to all of the students who entered posters, the judges, our guest speaker, discussion facilitators,  panelists, artists and the committee who pulled it all together.

The keynote lecture, “Mapping the Water Crisis of Unaffordability,” was by Monica Lewis-Patrick from We the People of Detroit.

The 2019 World Water Day Poster Award winners:

Original Research Awards

Coursework/Informational Awards

World Water Day at Michigan Tech was sponsored by the Great Lakes Research Center, the Departments of Social Sciences and Civil and Environmental Engineering, the School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science, the Sustainable Futures Institute, Center for Diversity and Inclusion,  Department of Visual and Performing Arts and the Western Upper Peninsula Planning and Development Region.

By the Great Lakes Research Center.

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DHH-NIH Funding for Jeremy Goldman

Jeremy Goldman (Bio Med) is the principal investigator on a project that has received a $45,790 research and development grant from the Department of Health and Human Services-National Institutes of Health.

Jaroslaw Drelich (MSE) is the Co-PI on the project “Inhibition of Neointimal Hyperplasia by Zinc-Based Biodegradable Arterial Devices.”

This is the first year of a potential two-year project.

By Sponsored Programs.

Jeremy Goldman
Jeremy Goldman
Jarek Drelich
Jarek Drelich

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DHH-NIH Funding for Feng Zhao

Feng Zhao (Bio Med) is the principal investigator on a project that has received a $459,000 research and development grant from Department of Health and Human Services – National Institutes of Health. Jeremy Goldman (Bio Med) is Co-PI on the project, “Development of Off-the-Shelf Completely Biological Small-Diameter Blood Vessel with Human Stem Cells.”

The is the first year of a potential three-year project.

Feng Zhao
Feng Zhao
Jeremy Goldman
Jeremy Goldman

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Biomedical Engineering Researchers Attend Adhesion Society Meeting

Adhesion Society Annual Meeting location photoBruce Lee (BioMed), Rupak Rajachar (BioMed), Ameya Narkar, Ariana Tyo and Saleh Akram attended the 42 Annual Meeting of the Adhesion Society in Hilton Head, South Carolina.

Lee served as the chair of the Bioadhesion Division within the Adhesion Society and was one of the organizers in the meeting. Rajachar chaired two sessions entitled “Interfaces in Pharmaceutical Sciences” and “Bioadhesive Chemistry.”

Narkar gave an oral presentation entitled “Evaluating Rapid Switching and Reversible Adhesion of Adhesive Hydrogel-Coated PDMS Micropillars,” a project directed by Lee. Narkar also co-chaired a session entitled “Bioadhesive Chemistry.”

Tyo gave an oral presentation entitled “Optimizing of Two-Step Adhesive Coating for the Mitigation of Field Associated Infection in Cetacean Satellite Telemetry Tags,” a project directed by Rajachar.

Akram gave an oral presentation entitled “Controlling Redox Reaction of Conductive Smart Catechol Adhesive using Electrochemistry,” a project directed by Lee.

The meeting took place February 17-20, 2019.

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Preparing Pre-health Students for Graduate School Interviews

Biomedical Engineering student looking at a computer screenMichigan Tech students interested in medicine, veterinary medicine and other health-related professions participated in the Health Professions Interview Workshop on Monday, April 9, 2018. The workshop was designed for students preparing for health-related graduate programs and admission interviews.

Thirteen pre-health students engaged in one-on-one personal interviews, Multiple Mini Interviews (MMI) and a large, team-building earthquake simulation.

“I really enjoyed the medical school mock interviews. I think MMIs are so unique to medical school interviews that most students don’t have any exposure to that kind of interaction,” said Rachel Wall, biological sciences student.

MMI interviews are used by many medical and health professions programs as part of the admissions process. An MMI is comprised of short, structured interview stations used to assess non-cognitive qualities and how applicants handle themselves in a particular situation. Some MMI stations involve role-playing situations where the interviewee is required to play a particular role and take an ethical stance in decision-making.

Wall continued, “Even the group activity portion is not something most people experience while being evaluated. I think those of us who participated in this will be much better prepared for our medical school interviews than our peers who haven’t had this type of exposure and practice.”

The biology department has hosted similar events in the past, but on a much smaller scale. This year, the pre-health department teamed up with Career Services to host a larger workshop for students of all majors with an interest in health professions.

More than a dozen volunteer interviewers, facilitators, actors and evaluators participated in the event—including faculty, students and staff from Pre-health, Biological Sciences, Biomedical Engineering, Kinesiology and Integrative Physiology, and Career Services. Central Michigan University’s Doctor of Physical Therapy Program also provided volunteers for the workshop.

The application and interview process for Health Professions Programs can be daunting, but this workshop, “is a part of the ongoing effort to grow and improve pre-health at Michigan Tech,” according to pre-health coordinator Nicole Seigneurie who spearheaded the workshop.

Elizabeth Scaife, biological sciences major, notes, “the Health Professions Interview Workshop was a wonderful experience full of challenging ethical questions, and a fun group activity that helped me find my strengths and weaknesses for future interviews for vet schools.”

By Career Services.

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Biomedical Research Featured in SME’s Humans of Manufacturing

Humans of ManufacturingResearch by biomedical engineers at Michigan Tech was featured in the article “SME’s Humans of Manufacturing — Developing Hearts,” in Additive Manufacturing. The article focuses on Dr. Martin Bocks’ efforts to solve cardiology problems in small children.

Developing Hearts

Dr. Martin Bocks Seeks to Solve Big Cardiology Problems in Small Children

“Right now, we use stents that are FDA approved for adult indications such as coronary or peripheral vascular disease, or stents for the biliary tract,” said Dr. Martin Bocks, a pediatric cardiology specialist at the Cleveland Ohio’s UH Rainbow Babies & Children’s Hospital.

Working with biomedical engineers from Michigan Tech University and Case Western Reserve University, he has developed a new type of stent made of a special zinc alloy that safely degrades over time and is gradually taken up by the body. It is not permanent like those made of Nitinol, stainless steel, or other bare metals, but shares many of the same properties.

Dr. Bocks explains that the manufacturing process is much the same as any other metal stent, except that the zinc is much harder to work with. “We start with the raw material provided by the team at Michigan Tech, have it cast into rods, and extruded into tubes or a cannulae, which are then laser cut according to our stent design. It’s electro-polished, crimped onto a balloon, and delivered. So far, it looks like an excellent alternative for pediatric patients.”

Read more at SME, Smart Manufacturing Experience, by SME Media.

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