Category: Psychology

Dr. Steelman Guest Blogs about Psychology at Michigan Tech

Dr. Kelly Steelman was invited to be a guest blogger for a website dedicated to promoting the advantages of attending smaller colleges. More specifically, she wrote about why Michigan Tech should be considered if a prospective student is interested in pursuing a psychology degree.

Dr. Steelman highlighted the opportunities and advantages of our CLS department, such as the low student to faculty ratio, the locally based internship program, and the enriching research experiences. Students are given the competitive edge of a large school but with the small school touch. Also, she emphasized Michigan Tech’s unique offering to study psychology and explore its connection to engineering or computer science.

Here is the link if you would like to read the blog post in its entirety.


ACSHF Keynote Speaker – Why Josh Stole the Password: A Decision Neuroscience Approach to Insider Threat in Information Security

Robert West, an Elizabeth P. Allen Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience at DePauw University, will be this year’s ACSHF keynote speaker. This event will take place on Monday, February 8th, 2021 at 2:00pm via Zoom. The Zoom link will be released closer to the event.

Abstract:
Cybercrime has a significant impact on nations, corporations, and individuals. Violations of information security can reduce consumer confidence and valuation at the corporate level, and jeopardize social and financial well-being at the personal level. Research in Information Systems reveals that up to 50% of violations or breaches of information security may result from insider threat, reflecting the actions of an individual operating within an organization. Considerable behavioral research has explored the organizational and individual factors that contribute to violations of information security related to insider threat. Building upon this tradition, my laboratory has been interested in exploring the neural foundation of decision making related to insider threat using EEG methods. This research reveals that there are robust ERP components that are sensitive to ethical decision making in the context of information security. Furthermore, this neural activity is modulated by individual differences (e.g., self-control, moral belief) that are known to be predictors of violations of information in real-world context. In the talk, I will explore the findings of some of our recent research in order to demonstrate the utility of a decision neuroscience approach to providing insight into the neural correlates of ethical decision making in the context of information security.