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  • ICC Distinguished Lecture: James Bezdek, Jan 29, 3 pm

    The Institute of Computing and Cybersystems will present a Distinguished Lecture by James C. Bezdek on Friday, January 29, 2021, at 3:00 p.m. via online meeting. Dr. Bezdek will present his lecture, “Streaming Data Analysis: Old Clothes Don’t Fit.”

    Join the Zoom virtual meeting here: https://michigantech.zoom.us/j/81987436773

    Bezdek is a visiting research fellow at The University of Melbourne, Australia. His interests include clustering in big data, woodworking, optimization, data visualization, cigars, fishing, anomaly detection, blues music, poker. He retired in 2007, and will be coming to a university near you soon.

    Bezdek received a Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics from Cornell University in 1973. He is past president of NAFIPS (North American Fuzzy Information Processing Society), IFSA (International Fuzzy Systems Association), and the IEEE CIS (Computational Intelligence Society). He is founding editor the international journals Approximate Reasoning and IEEE Transactions on Fuzzy Systems. He is life fellow of the IEEE and IFSA; and a recipient of the IEEE 3rd Millennium award, the IEEE CIS Fuzzy Systems Pioneer award, and the IEEE Rosenblatt and Kampe de Feriet award.

    Lecture Title

    Streaming Data Analysis: Old Clothes Don’t Fit

    Lecture Abstract

    This talk concerns models and algorithms that are generally described as “streaming clustering.” Some of the semantics and methods that are used in this field are co-opted from static clustering. But often, they don’t serve their purposes for streaming data very well. A review of “state of the art” methods such as sequential k-means, Birch, CluStream, DenStream, etc. shows that methods borrowed from classical batch techniques don’t transfer well to the streaming data case. Most of these models fail to acknowledge that the data are seen but once in real streaming analysis (e.g., intrusion detection, quality control). When the data are not saved, batch clustering ideas such as pre-clustering assessment, partitioning, and cluster validity are not relevant. I do not argue that current approaches to streaming clustering are wrong: but they are described wrong. This class of algorithms comprises transitional methods for an intermediate case that lies between static and (near real time) dynamic analysis which will eventually lead to a new and useful paradigm for this type of computation. I call these methods start and stop streaming data analysis.

    Five models are briefly reviewed and illustrated (albeit poorly, with small labeled data sets!). Then I will discuss four new incremental Stream Monitoring Functions and a new approach for visual assessment of streaming data. The conclusions? Useful analysis of real streaming data is in its infancy. We need to carefully define the objectives of streaming analysis, and then choose terminology and methods that suit this evolving paradigm.

    Bedek says his views on this topic are a bit controversial. You can read them here:

    Bezdek, J. C. and Keller, J. M. (2021). Streaming data analysis: Clustering or Classification?, IEEE Trans. SMC, DOI: 10.1109/TSMC.2020.3035957 

    Havens Appointed First IEEE CIS Conference Publication Editor

    Timothy C. Havens, College of Computing, has been appointed as the first Conference Publication Editor of the IEEE Computational Intelligence Society (IEEE CIS).

    Havens is associate dean for research, College of Computing, the William and Gloria Jackson Associate Professor of Computer Systems, director of the Institute of Computing and Cybersystems (ICC), and a member of the ICC’s Center for Data Sciences.

    In this position, Dr. Havens will serve as the editor-in-chief for all publications of IEEE CIS conferences, including the flagship conferences IEEE International Joint Conference on Neural Networks (IJCNN), IEEE International Conference on Fuzzy Systems (FUZZ-IEEE), IEEE Congress Evolutionary Computation (IEEE CEC), IEEE World Congress Computational Intelligence (WCCI), and IEEE Symposium Series on Computational Intelligence (SSCI).


    New NSF Project to Improve Great Lakes Flood Hazard Modeling

    Thomas Oommen, Timothy C. Havens, Guy Meadows (GLRC), and Himanshu Grover (U. Washington) have been awarded funding in the NSF Civic Innovation Challenge for their project, “Helping Rural Counties to Enhance Flooding and Coastal Disaster Resilience and Adaptation.”

    The six-month project award is $49,999.

    Vision. The vision of the new project is to develop methods that use remote sensing data resources and citizen engagement (crowdsourcing) to address current data gaps for improved flood hazard modeling and visualization that is transferable to rural communities.

    Objective. The objective of the Phase-1 project is to bring together community-university partners to understand the data gaps in addressing flooding and coastal disaster in three Northern Michigan counties.  

    The Researchers

    Thomas Oommen is a professor in the Geological and Mining Engineering and Sciences department. His research efforts focus on developing improved susceptibility characterization and documentation of geo-hazards (e.g. earthquakes, landslides) and spatial modeling of georesource (e.g. mineral deposits) over a range of spatial scales and data types. Oommen is a member of the ICC’s Center for Data Sciences.

    Tim Havens is associate dean for research, College of Computing, the
    William and Gloria Jackson Associate Professor of Computer Systems, and director of the Institute of Computing and Cybersystems. His research interests include mobile robotics, explosive hazard detection, heterogeneous and big data, fuzzy sets, sensor networks, and data fusion. Havens is a member of the ICC’s Center for Data Sciences.

    Guy Meadows is director of the Marine Engineering Laboratory (Great Lakes Research Center), the Robbins Professor of Sustainable Marine Engineering, and a research professor in the Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics department. His research interests include large scale field experimentation in the Inland Seas of the Great Lakes and coastal oceans; nearshore hydrodynamics and prediction; autonomous and semi-autonomous environmental monitoring platforms (surface and sub-surface); underwater acoustic remote sensing; and marine engineering.

    Himanshu Grover is an asssistant professor at University of Washington. His research focus is at the intersection of land use planning, community resilience, and climate change.

    About the Civic Innovation Challenge

    The NSF Civic Innovation Challenge is a research and action competition that aims to fund ready-to-implement, research-based pilot projects that have the potential for scalable, sustainable, and transferable impact on community-identified priorities.


    Bob Mark Business Model Pitch Competition Is January 28

    The virtual Bob Mark Business Model Pitch Competition takes place Thursday, January 28, 2021, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.

    Graduate and undergraduate students from across campus disciplines are invited to compete. When registering, contestants can choose the competition category, as this year two pitch competition categories are available.

    A tribute to the late Professor of Practice Bob Mark, College of Business, the Bob Mark Business Model Pitch Competition recognizes student entrepreneurial spirit.

    Faculty, staff, students, alumni, and the community are invited to attend this energized virtual pitch competition.

    Register to attend the Bob Mark Business Model Competition

    Register to compete in the Bob Mark Business Model Competition

    Category 1: Idea Pitch

    A two-minute idea pitch that presents a creative solution to a problem. Pitches will be evaluated on their uniqueness and the potential impactfulness.

    Category 2: Business Model Pitch

    A four-minute business model pitch which touches on the innovation technology, emphasizes product-market fit and the potential value it brings to the market. Prizes will be awarded to the most scalable and actionable business model pitches.  Participants in the Business Model Pitch category are encouraged to sign up for the Business Model Boot Camp workshop on January 20, 2021 https://bit.ly/HuskyInnovateBootcamp

    This event is hosted by Husky Innovate, a collaboration between Pavlis Honors College, the College of Business and the Office of Innovation and Commercialization. Prizes will be awarded by the College of Business, the MTEC SmartZone, and Husky Innovate.  

    Prizes include:

    Idea Pitch Category

    • First Prize: $125
    • Second Prize: $75
    • Third Prize: $50
    • Social Impact Award: $100 (sponsored by Dr. Ellie Asgari – COB Gates Professor)

    Business Model Category

    • First Prize: $2,000 (sponsored by Rick and Jo Berquist)
    • Second Prize: $1,000 
    • Third Prize: $500
    • Honorable Mention (2 prizes): $250 each Audience Favorite: $250
    • MTEC SmartZone Breakthrough Innovation Award: $1,000
    • Social Impact Award: $1,000 (sponsored by Dr. Ellie Asgari – COB Gates Professor)

    Husky Innovate is Michigan Tech’s innovation and entrepreneurship resource hub. The unit hosts free workshops, competitions, NSF I-Corps lean startup workshops, innovation talks, internships, mentorship, and the Silicon Valley Experience.


    Health Research Institute Panel Is January 25, 12 pm

    Michigan Tech’s Health Research Institute (HRI) will host a panel discussion on Monday, January 25, 2021,, from 12:00 to 1:00 p.m.

    Health research at Michigan Tech has been steadily growing for over 10 years. This growth has led to many practical uses for the technology developed.  Three researchers, Dr. Megan Frost (Kinesiology and Integrative Physiology), Dr. Bruce Lee (Biomedical Engineering), and Assistant Professor Dr. Weihua Zhou (College of Computing) will discuss their experiences with start-ups and applying their research to relevant health problems.

    Registration

    Register for the live Zoom session here: http://bit.ly/HRI_talk


    Registration Open for Graduate Research Colloquium 2021

    by Graduate Student Government

    The Graduate Student Government announces that registration for this year’s virtual Graduate Research Colloquium (GRC) is now open. Due to the continuation of the SARS-CoV-19 pandemic, the event will be held virtually to avoid any community spread from taking place.

    It is gearing up to be an exciting event, and we are excited to see what everyone has to present. The GRC will be held Thursday and Friday, April 1/2. The event is a great opportunity to work on your presentation skills and prepare for upcoming conferences. Students are free to give an oral presentation, a poster talk, or both. All talks will be scored by judges from the same field as the presenter, who will give valuable insight and feedback on how you to improve the presentation.

    Cash prizes are available for the top three places in both oral and poster presentations ( 1st – $300, 2nd – $200, and 3rd – $100). Registration closes at 11:59 p.m., Tuesday March 2, at 11:59 p.m. Don’t wait, register today.

    Poster presentations will take place in a pre-recorded video style. Video submission deadline is March 22, 2021. A short Q&A session will take place with judges between 4-6 p.m. on April 1st.

    Oral presentation will be a 12 minute talk followed by Q&A session. The event will be capped off with a virtual GRC awards ceremony. All participants and judges are invited to attend. The ceremony will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. April 2, following the close of GRC. Full information can be found on our website.


    Winter WonderHack Is February 19-21

    By Winter Wonderhack

    Winter WonderHack is just around the corner. The event begins February 19, 2021, at 9:00 p.m., and ends February 21, 2021, at 9:00 a.m.

    Are you an up-and-coming coder? Do you have a coding project in mind you’ve been itching to finally bring to fruition? Or perhaps you have no ideas, but you need to add some new projects to your resume, something you can brag about to recruiters?

    Do you like to win prizes? How about just hanging out and/or playing games?

    Do all of the above and more at the virtual Winter WonderHack February 19-21.

    The event is sponsored by the College of Computing, Wolfram Language, Auto Owners Insurance, and Domino’s Pizza.

    “Okay, but what IS Winter WonderHack?” you may ask.

    Winter WonderHack is a hackathon hosted annually by MTU’s very own Humane Interface Design Enterprise, or HIDE. It is an event that extends over 36 hours, in which groups ranging in size from one to four people come together to build and code any project from scratch–but it’s not all work and no play! There are a wide range of activities that will be occurring all day and all night for you to take a break from brainstorming and just have fun!

    After the 36th hour on Sunday, all projects will be presented to a panel of judges, and then prizes will be awarded under a variety of categories, ranging from the Most Creative project to the Most Useless!

    For the entire weekend, MTU’s Red Team will host a Capture the Flag event. On Saturday, a Rocket League tournament will occur! Both events will be conducted virtually via Discord. (For anyone worried about missing out, Rocket League is available free for download on PC, PS4, XBox One, and Nintendo Switch.)

    All events during Winter Wonderhack are free, and all levels of technical backgrounds are welcome to attend! To register, visit the Winter Wonderhack website at https://winterwonderhack.com/#, and click on the Register link.

    Do you have more questions about the event? Please reach out to team@winterwonderhack.com. We hope to see you there!