Day: December 3, 2019

Medical Imaging and Informatics Lab Seeking Volunteer Research Assistants

A student views digital x-rays on multiple computers

The Laboratory of Medical Imaging and Informatics is seeking volunteer Research Assistants.

Are you looking for an exciting research experience in applied artificial intelligence and medical imaging/informatics? The MIIL Lab (Laboratory of Medical Imaging and Informatics) is hiring. We’re focused on developing new computer methods and techniques to solve significant healthcare problems and improve clinical practice.

Visit https://pages.mtu.edu/~whzhou/ for more information about our research projects.  Please see the attached flyer, below.  For more information, contact Weihua Zhou at whzhou@mtu.edu.

Under the guidance of the director, senior research assistants and clinical collaborators, Volunteer Research Assistants will conduct literature reviews, develop and validate software methods and tools, validate with computer simulations and patient data, analyze study data, prepare manuscripts, apply for student research fellowships, and more.

Both undergraduate and graduate students are welcome to apply.  For a more complete job description or to submit application materials, email whzhou@mtu.edu.

Lab Director: Weihua Zhou, Ph.D.

Locations:

  • Rekhi #109 @Michigan Tech (office)
  • Rekhi #324 @Michigan Tech (lab)

Required Qualifications:

  • Passion for science/ engineering and healthcare.
  • Strong academic performance with an intended major in computer science/ engineering, biomedical engineering, medical informatics, or electrical engineering. Postbaccalaureate students are also encouraged to apply.
  • Experience with any programming language.
  • Ability to work at lab on campus 8 hours each week
  • One-year commitment.
  • Strong willingness to learn new and challenging analytical methods.
  • Excellent communication skills.

Desired Qualifications:

  • Ability to work independently.
  • Interest in learning more about medical image analysis, machine learning/ deep learning, and/or natural language processing.
  • Proficiency with Python or MATLAB.

Required Application Materials (unofficial copies are accepted)

  • Cover letter and CV/resume
  • Most recent academic transcript

Download the Research Assistant Flyer

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“Artificial UnIntelligence,” A Keynote Lecture from Meredith Broussard

Meredith Broussard

The Institute for Policy, Ethics, and Culture’s Algorithmic Culture series continues with “Artificial UnIntelligence,” a keynote lecture from Meredith Broussard, on Thursday, Dec. 5 at 7 p.m. in Memorial Union Building Ballroom B, followed by a Q&A.

Collective enthusiasm for applying computer technology to every aspect of life has resulted in a vast number of poorly designed systems. We are so eager to do everything digitally—hiring, driving, paying bills, even choosing romantic partners—that we have stopped demanding our technology actually work.

In this talk, author and professor Meredith Broussard looks at the inner workings and outer limits of technology, and explains why we should never assume that computers always get things right. Making a case against technochauvinism—the belief that technology is always the solution—Broussard looks at whether self-driving cars really work and why social problems persist in every digital Utopia. If we understand the limits of what we can do with technology, Broussard tells us, we can make better choices about what we should do with it to make the world better for everyone.

Meredith Broussard is an associate professor at the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute of New York University and the author of Artificial Unintelligence: How Computers Misunderstand the World. Her research focuses on artificial intelligence in investigative reporting, with a particular interest in using data analysis for social good. You can follow her on Twitter @merbroussard or contact her via meredithbroussard.com.

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Meet and Greet with Author Meredith Broussard Is Thurs., Dec. 5, 2-3 pm

Meredith Broussard Meet and Greet Flyer

A Meet and Greet with author and professor Meredith Broussard will take place Thursday, December 5, from 2:00 to 3:00 pm, in Fisher Hall Room 127.

Dr. Broussard will present a public lecture Thursday, December 5, 7:00 pm to 8:30 p.m., in the Memorial Union Building (MUB), Ballroom B.

Our collective enthusiasm for applying computer technology to every aspect of life has resulted in a vast number of poorly designed systems. We are so eager to do everything digitally—hiring, driving, paying bills, even choosing romantic partners—that we have stopped demanding that our technology actually work.

In this talk, author and professor Meredith Broussard looks at the inner workings and outer limits of technology, and explains why we should never assume that computers always get things right. Making a case against technochauvinism—the belief that technology is always the solution—Broussard looks at whether self-driving cars really work and why social problems persist in every digital Utopia. If we understand the limits of what we can do with technology, Broussard tells us, we can make better choices about what we should do with it to make the world better for everyone.

Meredith Broussard is an associate professor at the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute of New York University and the author of Artificial Unintelligence: How Computers Misunderstand the World. Her research focuses on artificial intelligence in investigative reporting, with a particular interest in using data analysis for social good. You can follow her on Twitter @merbroussard or contact her via meredithbroussard.com.

Download the event flyer.

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Gowtham’s UN5390 Course Receives Shoutout at GitHub Universe

Gowtham

Michigan Tech’s course, UN5390: Scientific Computing, taught by Gowtham, Director of Research Computing, Information Technology for the College of Computing, received a shoutout by alumnus Tim Carmean ’07, Ford’s Central Software Process & Tools Supervisor, at GitHub Universe 2019, which took place November 13-14, 2019, in San Francisco, CA.

GitHub Universe is an annual two-day event that brings together a global interconnected community of over 1700 developers, industry thought leaders, and executives to hear what’s next from GitHub, and learn about the tools and concepts that are pushing the software industry forward. The conference featured over 50 insightful sessions and a dozen workshops from people who are defining the state of open source and the future of software development.

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Nathir Rawashdeh To Present Talk Fri., Dec. 6

Nathir Rawashdeh

Nathir Rawashdeh, College of Computing Assistant Professor of Mechatronics, Electrical, and Robotics Engineering Technology, will present a talk this Friday, December 6, from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m., in Rekhi 214. Rawashdeh will present a review of recent advancements in Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) applications, hardware, and software with a focus on vehicle localization and autonomous navigation. Refreshments will be served.

Abstract: Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGV) are being applied in many scenarios including, indoors, outdoors, and even extraterrestrial. Advancements in hardware and software algorithms reduce their cost and enable the creation of complete UGV platforms designed for custom application development, as well as research into new sensors and algorithms.

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Algorithmic Culture Series Lecture: Artificial UnIntelligence Is Dec. 5

Meredith Broussard

The Institute for Policy, Ethics, and Culture’s Algorithmic Culture series continues with “Artificial UnIntelligence,” a keynote lecture from Meredith Broussard, at 7 p.m. Thursday (Dec. 5) in Memorial Union Building Ballroom B, followed by a Q&A.

Collective enthusiasm for applying computer technology to every aspect of life has resulted in a vast number of poorly designed systems. We are so eager to do everything digitally—hiring, driving, paying bills, even choosing romantic partners—that we have stopped demanding our technology actually work.

In this talk, author and professor Meredith Broussard looks at the inner workings and outer limits of technology, and explains why we should never assume that computers always get things right. Making a case against technochauvinism—the belief that technology is always the solution—Broussard looks at whether self-driving cars really work and why social problems persist in every digital Utopia. If we understand the limits of what we can do with technology, Broussard tells us, we can make better choices about what we should do with it to make the world better for everyone.

Meredith Broussard is an associate professor at the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute of New York University and the author of Artificial Unintelligence: How Computers Misunderstand the World. Her research focuses on artificial intelligence in investigative reporting, with a particular interest in using data analysis for social good. You can follow her on Twitter @merbroussard or contact her via meredithbroussard.com.

Learn more about the Institute for Policy, Ethics, and Culture here: https://www.mtu.edu/ipec/

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Jinshan Tang, Jung Bae Receive Research Excellence Fund Awards

Jinshan Tang
Jungyun Bae

The Vice President for Research Office recently announced the Fall 2019 Research Excellence Fund (REF) awards. The awardees included College of Computing Professor Jinshan Tang, who was awarded a Portage Health Foundation (PHF) Infrastructure Enhancement (IE) Grants for his proposal, “High Performance Graphics Processing Units,” and College of Computing Assistant Professor Jung Yun Bae (ME-EM/CS), who was awarded a Research Seed Grant.

The REF Infrastructure Enhancement (REF-IE) grants are designed to provide resources to develop the infrastructure necessary to support sponsored research and graduate student education. Funded projects typically focus on acquisition of equipment, enhancement of laboratory facilities, or enhancement of administrative support structure to expand the research capability of the unit.

Typical REF Research Seed (RS) grant projects will develop preliminary data to be used in subsequent proposals to outside funding sources, support pilot studies developing new research methods or procedures, or support other activity leading to the development of an externally recognized and funded research program.

For additional information about the Research Excellence Funds, visit the REF website.

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Robert Pastel Presents at Social Science History Association Annual Meeting

Robert Pastel

Robert Pastel (Computer Science), along with Gary Spikberg (MS Industrial Heritage and Archaeology) and Don Lafreniere (SS/GLRC), presented “A Semiautomated approach to Creating Record Linkages and High Resolution Geocoding Across Historical Datasets” at the annual meeting of the Social Science History Association, which took place November 21-24, 2019, in Chicago, IL.

The Social Science History Association is an interdisciplinary organization that publishes a journal, Social Science History, organizes an annual conference, supports graduate student travel to the conference, and awards book prizes. With scholars from history, economics, sociology, demography, anthropology, and other social sciences, the association brings together scholars in thematic networks where they can explore common questions.

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