Day: November 23, 2010

How to edit a style

Styles apply a common set of formatting to a paragraph within Word.  In a previous post, we showed how to apply a style to a paragraph.  This tutorial will show two ways to edit an existing style.

First, edit the text as you desire.  In the example below, I have edited the text “Introduction” to be a different font (Adobe Garamond Pro Bold) and size (24 point) than the original Heading 1 style.  We can tell Heading 1 is applied to this text because it is outlined in orange in the Style section of the ribbon.

Edit the text to meet your specifications.


TIAA-CREF Ruth Simms Hamilton Research Fellowship

The TIAA-CREF Ruth Simms Hamilton Research Fellowship was established to honor the memory and outstanding work of Dr. Ruth Simms Hamilton, the former Michigan State University professor and TIAA trustee. Professor Hamilton was a TIAA trustee from 1989 to 2003 and during her 35-year career at Michigan State University, she was a highly regarded sociology professor and a faculty member of the African Studies Center, the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies and the Center for Advanced Study of International Development. She was an early pioneer of research concerning the African Diaspora – the study of the dispersion and settlement of African peoples once they left the African continent.

Fellowships are awarded to graduate students enrolled in a social science program at an accredited U.S. college or university and studying the African Diaspora

Deadline: January 3, 2011

If interested, please contact Jodi Lehman (jglehman@mtu.edu)


Dissertation Fellowships for Republic of China Students Abroad

Plan ahead for an opportunity to fund completion of your dissertation.

The Chiang Ching-Kuo Foundation for International Scholarly Exchange (CCKF)
American
offers doctoral candidates fellowship opportunities for students completing their dissertations in the humanities and social sciences.  Research must be focused on topics related to Chinese culture and scoiety, the development of the Republic of China, or Taiwan Studies. Their dissertations should cover one of the following fields: literature, history, philosophy, linguistics, art, sociology, anthropology, psychology, political science, legal studies, economics, or media studies.

Deadline: Oct 15, 2011

Upper amount of award: $15,000


SWE Graduate Fellowship Scholarship Postings

Society of Women Engineers has posted updated funding opportunities  for undergraduate and graduate level students majoring in any area of engineering.

For a complete listing of graduate scholarship see: http://societyofwomenengineers.swe.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=264&Itemid=131

For a complete listing of undergraduate scholarships see:  http://societyofwomenengineers.swe.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=230&Itemid=128


Steinman Fellowship

The National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE) awards this fellowship to a graduate from an ABET-accredited engineering program entering a graduate program in engineering. To be eligible for the fellowship, a candidate must be a senior in an undergraduate engineering program that is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC) of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). The candidate must also have taken and passed the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam and must have been accepted into a graduate engineering degree program at a school with an EAC-ABET-accredited graduate or undergraduate program. U.S. citizenship is required.

Application deadline: March 1st

Award amount: $10,000

For more information visit: http://www.nspe.org/Students/Scholarships/steinman.html


Hudson River Graduate Fellowships

HUDSON RIVER FUND GRANTS

The purpose of the Hudson River Foundation is to make science integral to decision-making with regard to the Hudson River and its watershed and to support competent stewardship of this extraordinary resource. The programs of the Hudson River Fund pursue this mission by providing leadership and support for an integrated program of research, monitoring, modeling, synthesis, and education to the management of the resources of the Hudson River.

Under the terms of the Settlement Agreement that established it, the Hudson River Fund is dedicated to supporting

“scientific, ecological, and related public policy research on issues and matters of concern to the Hudson River, its tributaries and its drainage basin, with emphasis given, but not limited to, mitigating fishery impacts caused by power plants, providing information needed to manage the fishery resources of the Hudson River, understanding the factors related to the abundance and structure of fish populations, and gaining knowledge of the Hudson River ecosystem.”

The geographical area of primary interest is the estuarine portion of the River (the mouth of New York Harbor to the Troy Dam, including the waterways and tributaries to the Harbor). However, the Foundation will consider proposals related to any part of the watershed or nearby coastal areas. Such areas are defined as those that either serve as seasonal habitats for biota of the estuary or influence the physical, chemical, or biological characteristics of the estuary in other ways.

Although the central purpose of the Hudson River Fund is to sponsor research in the natural sciences and public policy, the Foundation also assists in the coordination of research concerning the Hudson River system and promotes efforts leading to improved management policies. The Foundation seeks to advance understanding of the issues affecting the River by supporting the dissemination of information gained through Foundation-funded research programs and through other sources. The Foundation sponsors workshops and conferences, bringing together authorities working within the Hudson River Valley and elsewhere to discuss scientific and public policy issues. Reports from these meetings give direction for further scientific work and improve the information used as a basis for public policy decisions.

View the full 2011 Request for Proposals here.


Divising of Analytical Chemistry Fellowship Program

The American Chemical Society Division of Analytical Chemistry Graduate Fellowship Program is designed to encourage basic research in the field of analytical chemistry, to promote the growth of analytical chemistry in academic institutions and industry, and to provide recognition of future leaders in the field of analytical chemistry.  The program has endeavored to be a model of the benefits of cooperation between the academic and industrial communities, with chemical companies employing Ph.D. analytical chemists sponsoring the fellowships for outstanding analytical graduate students.

The Graduate Fellowship Committee of the ACS Division of Analytical Chemistry, which is comprised of representatives from the sponsoring companies, analytical faculty from undergraduate institutions, and scientists from national laboratories, evaluate the applications and make the fellowship awards.  Both nine-month ($21,000) and summer ($7,000) fellowships are available.

Eligibility criteria

The applicant must be a full-time student working toward a Ph.D. in analytical chemistry and must have completed the second year of graduate study by the time the fellowship period begins.  The applicant’s research supervisor must be a member of the American Chemical Society Division of Analytical Chemistry. Only one nomination per research supervisor will be accepted. Summer Fellowships must begin on June 1, 2011, therefore applicants for summer 2011 fellowships must not have completed their thesis research before September 1, 2011. Nine-month fellowships may begin on June 1, July 1, August 1 or September 1, 2011, therefore applicants for 2011-2012 nine-month fellowships must not have completed their thesis research before March 1, 2012. Applicants for awards in previous years are encouraged to reapply. Previous nine-month fellowship recipients, however, are not eligible for a second award.

Applicants must demonstrate outstanding research ability and accomplishment, as evidenced by peer-reviewed publications in analytical chemistry. Consequently, fellowships are normally awarded to students in their third or fourth years of graduate study when they have established a publication record.

Application process

Students must submit an application package consisting of a nomination form from the research advisor, an application describing previous accomplishments and the proposed research during the fellowship period, and all undergraduate and graduate transcripts.  In addition, students must arrange to have three letters of recommendation submitted on their behalf.

Application package (due December 10, 2010):

  1. 1)the completed nomination form from the research supervisor (1 page, available for download here)
  2. 2)the completed application form (5 pages, available for download here)
  3. 3)complete undergraduate and graduate transcripts

Please contact Jodi Lehman (jglehman@mtu.edu) or (487-2875) if interested in applying.


Humanistic Fellowships

The School for Advanced Research (SAR) awards approximately six Resident Scholar Fellowships each year to scholars who have completed their research and analysis and who need time to think and write about topics important to the understanding of humankind. Resident scholars may approach their research from anthropology or from related fields such as history, sociology, art, and philosophy. Both humanistically and scientifically oriented scholars are encouraged to apply.

SAR provides Resident Scholars with low-cost housing and office space on campus, a stipend up to $40,000, library assistance, and other benefits during a nine-month tenure, from September 1 through May 31. A six-month fellowship is also available for a female scholar from a developing nation, whose research promotes women’s empowerment. SAR Press may consider books written by resident scholars for publication in its Resident Scholar Series.

Six types of fellowships are available:

Weatherhead Fellowships

Up to two nine-month fellowships are available for either Ph.D. candidates or scholars with doctorates whose work is either humanistic or social scientific in nature.

Katrin H. Lamon Fellowship

One nine-month fellowship is available for a Native American PhD candidate or post-doctoral scholar working in either the humanities or the social sciences.

Henry Luce Fellowship

One nine-month fellowship is available for a postdoctoral Asian or American scholar whose research focuses on East Asia or Southeast Asia.

National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship

One nine-month fellowship is available for a postdoctoral scholar whose project relates to the humanities.

Anne Ray Fellowship

One nine-month fellowship is available for an established Native American scholar, working in the humanities, arts, or social sciences, who has a commitment to providing mentorship to recent Native graduates or graduate students. In addition to working on their own research, the Anne Ray Resident Scholar serves as a mentor to two Native interns working at the Indian Arts Research Center.

Campbell Fellowship

One six-month fellowship is available for a female social scientist from a developing nation, either a PhD candidate or post-doctoral scholar, whose work addresses women’s economic and social empowerment in that nation.

In addition, SAR is interested in hosting exceptional scholars who have received funding through the following programs: Ford Foundation Diversity Fellowships, Mellon/ACLS Recent Doctoral Recipients Fellowships, and Visiting Fulbright Scholar fellowships. Applicants to these non-SAR fellowship programs whose research is consistent with SAR’s mission may be able to join the School’s dynamic intellectual community for the duration of their fellowship. Interested scholars can contact SAR’s Resident Scholar Program for more information.

Please contact Jodi Lehman (jglehman@mtu.edu) if interested in applying for a fellowship position.