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    PinT 2021 – 10th Workshop on Parallel-in-Time Integration

    August 2-6, 2021. PinT 2021 will be offered in a virtual-format. 

    Register online on the Registration Page.

    Computer models and simulations play a central role in the study of complex systems in engineering, life sciences, medicine, chemistry, and physics. Utilizing modern supercomputers to run models and simulations allows for experimentation in virtual laboratories, thus saving both time and resources. Although the next generation of supercomputers will contain an unprecedented number of processors, this will not automatically increase the speed of running simulations. New mathematical algorithms are needed that can fully harness the processing potential of these new systems. Parallel-in-time methods, the subject of this workshop, are timely and necessary, as they extend existing computer models to these next generation machines by adding a new dimension of scalability. Thus, the use of parallel-in-time methods will provide dramatically faster simulations in many important areas, such as biomedical applications (e.g., heart modeling), computational fluid dynamics (e.g., aerodynamics and weather prediction), and machine learning. Computational and applied mathematics plays a foundational role in this projected advancement.

    The primary focus of the proposed parallel-in-time workshop is to disseminate cutting-edge research and facilitate scientific discussions on the field of parallel time integration methods. This workshop aligns with the National Strategic Computing Initiative (NSCI) objective: “increase coherence between technology for modeling/simulation and data analytics”. The need for parallel time integration is being driven by microprocessor trends, where future speedups for computational simulations will come through using increasing numbers of cores and not through faster clock speeds. Thus as spatial parallelism techniques saturate, parallelization in the time direction offers the best avenue for leveraging next generation supercomputers with billions of processors. Regarding the mathematical treatment of parallel time integrators, one must use advanced methodologies from the theory of partial differential equations in a functional analytic setting, numerical discretization and integration, convergence analyses of iterative methods, and the development and implementation of new parallel algorithms. Thus, the workshop will bring together an interdisciplinary group of experts spanning these areas.


    Computer Science Adds Faculty, Research Expertise


    The College of Computing is pleased to welcome new Department of Computer Science faculty members Dr. Dukka KC and Dr. Xinyu Lei.

    Dr. KC, associate professor, comes to Michigan Tech from Wichita State University (WSU); he was also on the faculty at North Carolina A&T University. His expertise is in applied deep learning and bioinformatics.

    Dr. Xinyu Lei, assistant professor, joins Michigan Tech directly following his PhD completion at Michigan State University. Dr. Lei’s speciality is cybersecurity.


    Dennis Livesay, Dave House Dean of Computing, has known Dr. KC for more than 20 years. “Most recently, we worked together at WSU,” Livesay says. “Dukka built the WSU Data Science programs and a number of large interdisciplinary research teams, including a high-profile disaster resiliency effort that enables formation of research clusters to address some of today’s most pressing challenges.”

    “Michigan Tech and the College’s research successes are drawing world-class faculty to our campus, and creating exciting new learning and research opportunities for our students,” Livesay notes.

    Dean Livesay, who joined MTU earlier this year, is pursuing a steep growth trajectory for the College. Hiring additional faculty bolsters both student success and research capacity, two of Livesay’s four strategic areas of emphasis in the College’s growth initiative, “Forward Together.” Additional strategic initiatives are growing diversity and inclusion and expanding partnerships with industry.


    Dean Liveay’s Open Office Hours to Resume August 24, 2-3 pm


    College of Computing Dean Dennis Livesay will resume in-person open drop-in office hours every Friday from 2:00 to 3:00 p.m., beginning Friday, August 24, 2021, through the spring 2022 semester, while classes are in session.

    All faculty, staff, and students who wish to chat with Dr. Livesay are invited to “drop in.” Appointments are not needed.

    Dean Livesay’s office is in Rekhi Hall, Room 223. Email the dean at dlivesay@mtu.edu.


    Dr. Daniel Fuhrmann Named Chair of Applied Computing Department


    Dr. Daniel R. Fuhrmann, Dave House Professor of Computer Engineering, has been appointed chair of the Department of Applied Computing, effective immediately. Dr. Fuhrmann has been interim chair of the department since its founding in 2020. Prior to joining the College of Computing, he was chair of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) from 2008 to 2019.

    “I couldn’t be more excited,” said Dr. Dennis Livesay, the Dave House Dean of Computing. “Dan was instrumental in the creation of the College, and I know that his leadership will help the department achieve its promise. Computing is transforming every discipline and it’s hard to imagine any unit on campus reflecting that more than the Department of Applied Computing.”

    The Department of Applied Computing offers undergraduate Bachelor of Science programs in Computer Network and System Administration (CNSA) and Electrical Engineering Technology (EET). On the graduate side, the department also offers a M.S. in Health Informatics.

    The department also collaborates on three convergence programs. In cooperation with the Department of Computer Science it offers the B.S. in Cybersecurity, which began enrolling students in Fall 2019. In cooperation with the Department of Manufacturing and Mechanical Engineering Technology (MMET), in the College of Engineering, the department offers both a M.S. and B.S. in Mechatronics, which began enrolling students in Fall 2019 and 2020, respectively.

    In addition to teaching AC program courses, faculty in the department pursue research in a variety of computing areas, including cybersecurity, mechatronics, health informatics, and machine learning. Growing the department’s industrial and applied research portfolio will be a major emphasis for Dr. Fuhrmann.

    “I’m excited about doing what I can to help build this new department at Michigan Tech,” says Fuhrmann. “There are a lot of synergies that may not be immediately apparent within traditional academic structures, but they reflect what is happening in industry today.”

    For example, computer networks and cybersecurity are playing an increasingly important role in industrial control and automation, and robotics and the Internet of Things is highly relevant for the evolving field of health informatics, Fuhrmann explains.

    “Machine learning is also having an impact across all areas in the department,” Fuhrmann adds. “We will be focusing on helping both our students and our industry partners navigate this convergence of physical and cyber technologies.”

    The Department of Applied Computing brings together those faculty and programs in the College of Computing with a common interest in applied aspects of computing.


    MTRAC Advanced Computing Hub Requesting Proposals

    The Michigan Translational Research and Commercialization (MTRAC) Advanced Computing Technologies Innovation Hub, hosted at Wayne State University, has opened a Request for Proposal period lasting until Aug. 31.

    Commercialization-focused MTRAC grants provide funding to address the “valley of death” and guidance from an experienced oversight committee comprised of venture capitalists, seasoned entrepreneurs and industry experts. Eligible technologies include cognitive technologies, immersive technologies, cybersecurity, internet of things, industry x.o, blockchain and next-generation computing.

    If you have questions about specific project eligibility or the proposal process, please reach out to Nate Yenor at nryenor@mtu.edu

    For additional information about the program, please visit Wayne State’s MTRAC Advanced Computing Technologies web page.


    Health Informatics Online Master’s Degree Ranked #6


    The Michigan Tech Master’s in Health Informatics program has been ranked 6th on the list, ” Top 10 Online Master’s In Healthcare Informatics Programs 2021,” published recently by BestOnlineSchools.org. The Michigan Tech Health Informatics MS program is the only university in Michigan to appear on the top ten list.

    The Michigan Tech Master of Science in Health Informatics prepares students for careers as data and information professionals in clinical and medical fields.

    In the flexible, 30-credit program, which can be completed entirely online, graduate students choose courses from areas such as artificial intelligence in healthcare, cybersecurity and privacy, clinical decision modeling, and big data analytics to earn a M.S. of Health Informatics degree. Students will also earn graduate certificates in the specialized and growing areas of Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare and Security and Privacy in Healthcare through this coursework.


    View the TheBestSchools.org ranking here.