Category: EE

Information that applies specifically to EE majors.

Photonics – the use and study of light

EE majors may take photonics courses for EE elective credit, or may follow requirements to earn a Concentration in Photonics – which is listed on the diploma.

View a sample Photonics Concentration flowchart (2021-2022).

Photonics is using light energy to do work: sensing, imaging, communication. Photonics entails the control of photons in making systems faster, more efficient and more accurate, in a wide range of applications from energy generation to detection to communications and information processing. Robotic sensing and vision, space photography, medical instrumentation, imaging, and satellite communication are a few areas using photonics.

Students study laser systems, optics, and the control of photons/light.

EE2190, Introduction to Photonics, offered spring semesters.

EE3190, Optical Sensing and Imaging, Spring semesters.  Prereq: MA3521/20; JR/SR.

EE3290, Photonic Material, Devices, and Applications, Spring semesters. Prereq: EE3140 or EE3090 or PH2400.

EE4490, Laser Systems and Applications, check schedule for semester offered.  Pre-req: EE3140.

Companies hiring MTU photonics majors include Raytheon, NAVSEA and CRANE. To add the Photonics Concentration, submit a request in MyMichiganTech curriculum changes .

Photonics elective courses (6 credits minimum with the concentration): BE4250,BE4410,EE4240,EE4252, EE4253,  EE4290,  MSE/PH4292, PH3410,PH4510,PH4640

We are unique!  Very few universities offer an undergraduate photonics program.  For additional information on courses, SPIE, OSA or getting involved in research, contact:

  • Dr. Durdu Guney,  EERC 729,    dguney@
  • Dr. Chris Middlebrook,  EERC 628,  ctmiddle@

Cool Beams!

Linear Algebra and Differential Equations

Linear Algebra and Differential Equations:  what EE and CpE majors need to know

  • MA2321 and MA3521 are Accelerated and taken in same semester.
  • Lin Alg (MA2321 or MA2320) is the pre-req for Diff Eq(MA3521 or MA3520)
  • Students must pass MA2321 to continue on in MA3521
  • MA2320 is same course as MA2321, but uses full semester to complete
  • MA3520 is same course as MA3521, but uses full semester to complete after MA2320.
  • MA2321/MA3521 is the accelerated-pace option (take at least 14 credits)
  • MA2320 and MA3520 is the two-semester option
  • Diff Eq (MA3521 or MA3520) is a pre-req to Circuits II (EE2112)
  • Linear Algebra and Diff Eq are prereqs to Signals & Systems (EE3160).

Photonics Electives – for Concentration

BSEE – Photonics Concentration Electives          (see flowcharts)

A minimum of  6 credits of the following are required with the Photonics Concentration:

Be sure to look up latest pre-reqs and semester offerings in the online course descriptions and Schedule of Classes.

BE 4250 (3) Biomedical Optics,   Even Springs      (Lin Alg, Diff Equ, and MA3160)

BE 4410 (3) Medical Imaging,  Odd Springs   (BE 3700 and BE 3710)

EE 4252 (4) Digital Signal Processing and it’s Applications,  Fall     (EE3160)

EE 4253 (3) Real Time Signal Processing,  Spring    (EE4252)

EE  5522(3) Digital Image Processing,   Spring  (EE3190 and EE3160) Not Spring 2014.

MSE/PH 4292 (3) Light and Photonic Materials,   Fall    (PH2200(C))

PH 4510 (2) Introduction to Solid State Physics,   Fall   ((PH2300 or 1360) and PH2400 and (CH11150/51) and Diff Equ)

More about the BSEE – Photonics Concentration.

ECE graduate degree – grad school

Consider pursuing a graduate degree after completion of your bachelor’s. Students have taken advantage of one or both of these opportunities:

1) The ECE Department offers an Accelerated Master’s program. (cumulative GPA of 3.25+ required) With this program, students can double-count up to six credits of coursework towards an accelerated master’s degree in EE or CpE.  A master’s degree requires 30 credits, so students in the Accelerated Master’s Program take 24 credits after completion of their bachelor’s degree. What a deal!

Students who do not meet the 3.25 minimum GPA requirements for the Accelerated Master’s program, may apply for graduate school, and will take 30 credits after completion of the bachelor of science degree to earn a master of science in EE or CpE.

2) Students may take graduate courses while they are still an undergraduate student, under the Senior Rule, if they have room in the last semester(s). This is DIFFERENT than the accelerated master’s program six credits.  With the senior rule, specific courses are designated for a graduate transcript only, and may not be used toward your bachelor’s degree. See this link to get the Senior Rule Form. The credits are available for possible use toward a graduate degree and may be transferred elsewhere. It is up to the program you pursue to approve the courses for a graduate degree. Pay undergraduate tuition.

4000 and 5000 level courses may be used with either option. A maximum of 9 credits of 4000 level coursework may be used toward a master’s. All EE courses must have a grade of BC or better to be used toward a master’s degree in the ECE Department. All credits must be approved by your graduate program advisor.

Why grad school?  see:

Spring 2015 ECE grad school information session with Dr. Lukowski and Dr. Mork. 49 minutes.

If you are uncertain about your options, please meet with your advisor and see what might work for you! It’s worth considering!

MORE INFORMATION and How To Apply:

Computer Engineering, MS, PhD

Electrical Enginering, MS, PhD

ECE Accelerated Master’s program

Online Master’s in Power Systems

ECE Learning and Help Center: EERC 123

The ITC Learning and Help Center is hosting limited Virtual Hours for Fall 2020  via this Zoom Link during the following times:

Afternoons:
Monday, Wednesday, Thursday:  1 pm – 4 pm
Tuesday: 1 pm – 3 pm

Evenings:
6 pm – 8 pm Sunday through Thursday

Can in-person coaching sessions be scheduled? If you need face-to-face help, feel free to contact one of the coaches and see if they can meet you in EERC room 123 at a mutually convenient time.

Engineering Design Prerequisites

Whether you are doing Enterprise or Senior Design, you will need to meet the same requirements before enrolling. Be “Senior Design Ready” before registration in ENT 4950 or EE 4901 or MEEM 4901 or BE 4901.

CpE’s:  Complete EE3901 and EE3131. EE3173 can be taken before or with EE4901 or ENT4950.

EE’s:  Complete EE3901 and EE3131. EE3171 can be taken before or with EE4901 or ENT4950.
Photonics majors – see Judy for prerequisite waiver of EE3171.

RE’s:  Complete EE3901 and EE3280 and EE3261. See Judy if prereq waiver is needed for EE3901. EE3261 may be slightly flexible – consult with Judy as needed.

EE3901 (Design Fundamentals) is required for all ECE students.

EE3171 (EE’s) or EE3173(CpE’s) or EE3261 (RE’s) is a prerequisite for the second half of your final design path (EE4910 or ENT4960) and must be completed successfully before you enroll in those courses.

As a reminder, your Engineering Design requirements may be completed with a one-year senior design project in EE4901-4910, MEEM4901-4911 or by completing Enterprise project work using ENT3950, ENT3960, ENT4950, and ENT4960. Plan on having two semesters remaining after completion of prerequisite courses to complete engineering design at the senior level.

Enterprise students who have completed ENT3950 and ENT3960, but are not ready to take ENT4950 may enroll in ENT3980 if you want to stay in your enterprise while you’re completing your design prerequisites. ENT3980 does not apply to your Engineering Design Requirements.

CpE and EE Double Major

If you enjoy both hardware and software, or can’t decide between EE and CpE, consider a double major (or a Master’s degree – even better!)

To  Add a double-major and/or change your primary major, use the Curriculum change portlet in MyMichiganTech.

Meet all requirements for both majors.
Flowchart: Here is a sample CpE + EE Double major 5 year plan. This can be done in 4.5 years with heavier credit loads, or if you are ahead on course completions.

Meet with Judy for questions and help with planning.  You can start out following the CpE flowhart and add additional courses later on.  It is usually best to make CpE your primary major and EE your secondary major.  You may switch those prior to graduation, if you’d rather have EE as your primary major on your diploma.

EE Electives / Focus Areas

The Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering degree requirements contain a number of credits for  “EE Electives“. You will see “boxes” for these credits listed on the 8-semester flowcharts, and an area of the degree audit report for EE elective coursework. This is a way to choose classes you most prefer from different focus areas or areas of specialization.

The number of credits required in EE (Technical) Electives varies depending on without or with a concentration, and the catalog year you are following. Your degree audit report shows the minimum number of “EE Electives” credits you need and how your registered and completed courses are applied toward degree requirements.

What are “EE Electives”? also called “EE Technical Electives“.

The ECE Department groups EE courses by “Focus Area” (area of specialization): Signal Processing, Power, Control, Computer, Electronics, Photonics, etc… See here for the latest list. If you plan ahead, you should be able to get all or most of the courses you prefer. Each course is typically offered once per year, either in fall or spring, so plan ahead for your next two or three semesters. Look up course prerequisites in the undergraduate course descriptions link. View the Schedule of Classes to see what courses are offered in a particular semester, when that schedule is available.

You do not have to choose one focus area, and you can mix and match the courses as you like. A concentration may use some of these courses as required courses for the concentration.

What can count?  EE courses that are mainly lecture and/or lab-based courses with the subject code of “EE”. These types of credits will not count: project, research, and independent study credits.  Specifically required courses such as EE2112 or EE3131 will not count in “EE Electives” (see “major requirements” on the degree audit report).

When should you choose EE Elective courses and howThis advising tutorial will help.
Begin to get familiar with the EE Electives list as early as the sophomore year, and ideally, no later than the end of the third year, to plan for the courses you’d prefer by the time you graduate.

Meet with Judy if you’d like help with planning future semesters with your EE Elective choices.

Take the time to consider these explorations:

– join an enterprise project team that deals with a area or two that you might be interested in

– join IEEE and/or SPIE for access to world-wide information in the field and the various focus areas; talk with mentors (ieee@mtu.edu for more info)

– become involved with undergraduate research in one of the areas you’d like to explore

– talk with faculty who teach or do research in areas you’re curious about. They are the experts.

– take a co-op semester or summer internship. This can expose you to one or more areas of specialization, and help you decide which electives you might take after you return.

– ask an acquaintance, senior student, or someone you know working in industry; inquire about job-shadowing at a company near your hometown

Summary:
“EE (Technical) Electives” are courses in topics from the various areas of specialization (focus areas) in ECE. You can mix and match them as you like. You do not have to take all the classes listed under a focus area. Choose the courses you most prefer. Plan ahead (2nd and 3rd year). 
Each concentration has a different number of “EE Elective” credits required. 

Where to find:
Focus Areas: EE electives listed by focus area and by semester in which they are offered.

Concentration flowcharts — Expand “8-Semester Flowcharts”.

All on the ECE Electrical Engineering advising page

Selecting EE Elective  courses for the BSEE (EE Technical Electives)

CpE Technical Elective  courses for the BSCpE.

Accelerated Master of Science MS

The Michigan Tech Graduate School may offer a limited number of Graduate Academic Excellence Awards (GAEA). Check with the Graduate School Admissions Office (Admin Building 4th Floor) or with Dr. Paul Bergstrom, Director of ECE graduate programs (EERC 630). 

ECE: Accelerated Master of Science degree program.

Undergraduate electrical engineers and computer engineers are allowed to count up to six credit hours toward both their bachelor’s and master’s degrees in the ECE Department, and could potentially finish their master’s degree in one academic year (two semesters). The credits must be at least 4000 level, lecture-based coursework. (Excludes UG research, individual project, enterprise and senior design credits)

ECE Accelerated Master’s preparation checklist  How to get started.

Undergraduate students can apply, using the standard Graduate School application, as early as their junior year and may start taking graduate level courses during their senior year. 
GPA: An undergraduate minimum cumulative GPA of 3.00 is required to apply, however, a 3.25 or higher assures acceptance and holds a higher consideration for funding.

Graduate School accelerated masters information.

Take an extra course(s) for a future grad program while you’re an undergrad:

Senior Rule: Students may take graduate program courses under the Senior Rule if they have time for an extra course in senior year. This designates a course as “GR”, graduate level, making the course available for possible use in a future graduate degree program. Courses taken under Senior Rule may NOT apply to the undergraduate degree. Senior Rule credits could be transferred and considered by graduate programs outside MTU-ECE. Senior Rule credits are on your graduate transcript, and not on your undergraduate transcript.




Environmental Quality Engineering Electives – for concentration

BSEE Environmental Applications Concentration  (2015 flowchart)

Choose two courses (6 credits minimum) from the Environmental Quality Engineering Electives list:

ENVE 4502  Wastewater Treatment Principles and Design  Fall

ENVE 4503   Drinking Water Treatment Principles and Design  Spring

ENVE 4504   Air Quality Engineering and Science  Fall

ENVE 4505   Surface Water Quality Engineering   Fall

ENVE 4507   Water Distribution and Wastewater Collection Design   Spring

ENVE 4511    Solid and Hazardous Waste Engineering   Spring

Note: The Environmental Applications Concentration includes a choice of two Remote Sensing sequences:

1.  EE4252 and GE4250  DSP and it’s Applications, and Fundamentals of Remote Sensing

or

2. EE3090 and EE3190  Geometrical and Wave Optics, and Optical Sensing and Imaging

Link to undergraduate course descriptions