Also in this section

Category Archives: EE

Information that applies specifically to EE majors.

ECE Focus Areas (ece electives)

ECE focus areas:  EE and CpE majors can use their “EE  Electives” or “CpE Technical Electives” to specialize in one or more areas.  These courses include EE and CpE lecture-based courses taught in the ECE Department. CpE’s may also use CS courses for their CpE technical electives

The ECE Focus Areas .pdf – one slide per focus area shows:

  • brief description
  • course numbers and when to take them
  • faculty who teach and research in the area
  • some job types

(most) Courses in light blue boxes considered “EE Electives” and “CpE Technical Electives”

Use the focus area slides in conjunction with:

the list of “EE Electives”  (ECE taught lectures/labs)

Selecting EE Elective  courses for the BSEE (EE Technical Electives)

the CpE Technical Elective  courses or the BSCpE.


Accelerated Master of Science MS

The Michigan Tech Graduate School is offering a limited number of Graduate Academic Excellence Awards (GAEA) which provide a one-time payment of $4500 in tuition support for the first semester of study in the Accelerated MS programs.  Well-qualified students will be nominated for the GAEA by the ECE Department, with academic merit being the sole criterion.   No separate application is required. Meet with Dr. Michael Roggemann, EERC 503, and bring a copy of your transcript.

ECE: Accelerated Master of Science degree program.

Undergraduate electrical engineers and computer engineers are allowed to count up to six credit hours toward both their bachelor’s and master’s degrees in the ECE Department, and could potentially finish their master’s degree in one academic year (two semesters). The credits must be at least 4000 level, lecture-based coursework. (Excludes UG research, individual project, enterprise and senior design credits)

ECE Accelerated Master’s preparation checklist  How to get started.

Undergraduate students can apply, using the standard Graduate School application, as early as their junior year and may start taking graduate level courses during their senior year. ECE Applicants must maintain an undergraduate minimum cumulative GPA of 3.25 to apply and to remain in the program.

Graduate School accelerated masters information.

 

Take an extra course(s) for a future grad program while you’re an undergrad:

Senior Rule: Students may take graduate program courses under the Senior Rule if they have time for an extra course in senior year. This designates a course as “GR”, graduate level, making the course available for possible use in a future graduate degree program. Courses taken under Senior Rule may NOT apply to the undergraduate degree. Senior Rule credits could be transferred and considered by graduate programs outside MTU-ECE. Senior Rule credits are on your graduate transcript, and not on your undergraduate transcript.


SELECT Approved Electives (EE majors)

SELECT Approved Electives: This list has been created especially for the BSEE by our esteemed faculty and industry advisory committee. These topics broaden the knowledge of the EE graduate.  Required in 2013-14 and beyond catalog years.

SELECT Approved Electives – Non-EE courses that require only limited prerequisite coursework and add to the knowledge breadth of the graduate.

EE/EET 3373 - Intro to Programmable Controllers (0-2-3) Fall
 --EET 1411 or (EET 2120 and EET 2141) or EET 2411 or PH 2230 or EE 2112 or EE 3010
ENG 2120 - Statics-Strength of Materials (4)  Spg
 --MA 2160 and PH 2100 and ENG 1102
ENG 3200 - Thermodynamics/Fluid Mechanics (4)   Spg
  --MA 2160 and CH 1112 or (CH 1150 and CH 1151) and PH 2100 and ENG 1102
ENG 4510 - Sustainable Futures I (3)  Fall
 --Junior or Senior standing
MEEM 2110 - Statics (3)   Fall, Spg, Smr
 --COE enrolled and MA 2160
MEEM 2150 - Mechanics of Materials (3)  Fall, Spg, Smr
 --COE enrolled and MEEM 2110
MEEM 2200 - Thermodynamics (3)   Fall, Spg, Smr
 --COE enrolled and MA 2160 and CH 1150 and CH 1151
MEEM 2201 - Introductory Thermodynamics (3) Fall,Spg,Smr
 --MA 2160 and CH 1150 and CH 1151
MEEM 2700 - Dynamics (3)   Fall, Spg, Smr
 --PH 2100 and (MEEM 2110 or ENG 2120) and MA 3160(C)
MEEM 3210 - Fluid Mechanics (3)   Fall, Spg, Smr
 --MEEM 2200 and MEEM 2700(C) and (MA 3520 or MA 3521 or MA 3530 or MA 3560)
 --Co-Req MEEM 3220
MEEM 3220  - Energy Laboratory (2)   Fall, Spg, Smr
 --MEEM 2200 and MEEM 3210(C)
MY 2100 - Intro to Materials Science Engineering (3)  Fall, Spg, Smr
 --CH 1112 or CH 1122 or (CH 1150 and CH 1151) or (CH 1160 and CH 1161)
MY 3292 - Light & Photonic Materials (3)   Spg
  --(PH 2200 or EE 3090 or EE 3140
PH 2300 - University Physics III-Fluids and Thermodynamics (4)   Spg
  --PH 1160 or PH 2100
PH 2400 - University Physics IV, Waves and Modern Physics (3)   Fall, Spg, Smr
  --PH 2200 or PH 2260
PH3300 - Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics (3)    Spring
 --PH 2300 or PH 1360

To benefit students considering a minor or concentration in these topics, ECE added courses that may be used in SELECT approved elective area:

CS1142 - Programming at the H/S Interface (prereq: CS1131 or CS1122)
BL2010 - Anatomy & Physiology I (prereq:  CH1000 or (CH1150 and 1151))
BE2400 - Cellular & Molecular Biology (prereq: CH1150 and Calculus I)
CEE3501 - Environmental Engineering Fundamentals (prereq: Calc II and CH1150 & CH1151)
CEE3502 - Environmental Monitoring and Measurement Analysis (prereq: Calc II and CH1150 & CH1151)

 



Environmental Quality Engineering Electives – for concentration

BSEE Environmental Applications Concentration  (2015 flowchart)

Choose two courses (6 credits minimum) from the Environmental Quality Engineering Electives list:

ENVE 4502  Wastewater Treatment Principles and Design  Fall

ENVE 4503   Drinking Water Treatment Principles and Design  Spring

ENVE 4504   Air Quality Engineering and Science  Fall

ENVE 4505   Surface Water Quality Engineering   Fall

ENVE 4507   Water Distribution and Wastewater Collection Design   Spring

ENVE 4511    Solid and Hazardous Waste Engineering   Spring

Note: The Environmental Applications Concentration includes a choice of two Remote Sensing sequences:

1.  EE4252 and GE4250  DSP and it’s Applications, and Fundamentals of Remote Sensing

or

2. EE3090 and EE3190  Geometrical and Wave Optics, and Optical Sensing and Imaging

Link to undergraduate course descriptions


Biomedical Applications Electives – for concentration

BSEE – Biomedical Applications Concentration   (2015 flowchart)

Includes 3 credits from the biomedical engineering applications electives list:

BE2800  Biomaterials I   Spring

BE3300  Biomechanics I   Fall

BE3350  Biomechanics II   Spring

BE3800  Biomaterials II  Fall

BE4250  Biomedical Optics  Alternate Springs (odd)

BE4610  Biological Microscopy for Engineers  Alternate Falls (odd)

BE4700  Biosensors: Fabrication & Applicaions  Alternate Falls  (odd)

BE4755   Medical Devices   Fall

Link to undergraduate course descriptions  shows prerequisites, semester offerings and other course details

Note: BE2800 or BE3300 will be a required choice.  The other may be taken for the biomedical applications elective course.


EE Elective Credits – Selecting Classes

What are “EE Electives”?

EE majors and CpE/EE double majors
who are currently enrolled in junior core classes will soon be choosing courses for their “EE Electives” credit and focus area(s) (specialization).
Having a focus area is not required, and not listed on the diploma, but it is beneficial for job hunting and career planning. A co-op experience is a great way to get exposure to one or more focus areas. (or areas of specialization)

EE Elective courses are lecture-based courses dealing with more in-depth or new (to you) topics in electrical engineering.

Focus Areas: Communication, Computing Systems, Control, Electromagnetics, Electronics, Photonics, Signal Processing, Wireless Communication

Some areas offer a fall-spring sequence such as Signal Processing, Power, and Photonics.  You can acquire a “focus area” by succeeding in multiple courses that relate to one area. You can have more than one “focus area”. Or, you can mix and match courses as you like. You do not have to have a focus area, however it may be best for your resume to be highly knowledgeable and skilled in at least one area.
Completing the junior-level core courses prior to your last year, or last fall-spring sequence gives you the best options for taking the classes you’d like, as shown on the suggested plan/flowchart.

Meet with  faculty members  who specialize in areas you might be interested in, to find our more. They are a fantastic resource and are experts in their area(s).
Perhaps you will find an opportunity to participate in research under a faculty member in one of the areas you are interested in.

PLAN AHEAD:  it is very import to plan ahead to get the electives you’d like.  LOOK UP the course pre-requisites online (don’t rely on pdf’s or  paper handouts).  EE Elective classes are offered in fall or spring, NOT BOTH, so you need to plan ahead.

A bit about Concentrations: a Concentration is listed on the diploma. A focus area is not.

The Photonics area offers a ‘Concentration’ in PhotonicsEE3090, Introduction to Geometric and Wave Optics is offered in fall semesters. The pre-req is Diff EQ and co-req is EE3140, Electromagnetics(may be pre-req).  EE-Photonics majors choose 3 cr. of EE electives.

The Power and Energy area offers a ‘Concentration’ in Electric Power Engineering. EE3120, Electric Energy Systems is the first course taken, and is offered in Fall, Spring and Summer. EE3120 requires EE2112, Circuits II, as a co-requisite or prerequisite. EE-Power concentration students choose 3 cr. of EE electives, and 6 cr. of power/energy related EE electives.

A concentration in the Controls area is being created…stay tuned!

For questions on meeting degree requirements with EE Electives, e-mail or see the academic advisor, and run your degree audit report.

Courses which cannot be used in the EE Electives requirement: co-op, research, project and independent study courses: EE3805 (now obsolete), EE4805, EE4000, EE5805, EE5990, UN300x.


ECE graduate degree – grad school

Consider pursuing a graduate degree after completion of your bachelor’s. Students have taken advantage of one or both of these opportunities:

1) The ECE Department offers an Accelerated Master’s program. (cumulative GPA of 3.25+ required) With this program, students can double-count up to six credits of coursework towards an accelerated master’s degree in EE or CpE.  A master’s degree requires 30 credits, so students in the Accelerated Master’s Program take 24 credits after completion of their bachelor’s degree. What a deal!

Students who do not meet the 3.25 minimum GPA requirements for the Accelerated Master’s program, may apply for graduate school, and will take 30 credits after completion of the bachelor of science degree to earn a master of science in EE or CpE.

2) Students may take graduate courses while they are still an undergraduate student, under the Senior Rule, if they have room in the last semester(s). This is DIFFERENT than the accelerated master’s program six credits.  With the senior rule, specific courses are designated for a graduate transcript only, and may not be used toward your bachelor’s degree. See this link to get the Senior Rule Form. The credits are available for possible use toward a graduate degree and my be transferred elsewhere. It is up to the program you pursue to approve the courses for a graduate degree. Pay undergraduate tuition.

4000 and 5000 level courses may be used with either option. A maximum of 9 credits of 4000 level coursework may be used toward a master’s. All EE courses must have a grade of BC or better to be used toward a master’s degree in the ECE Department. All credits must be approved by your graduate program advisor.

Why grad school?  see:

Spring 2015 ECE grad school information session with Dr. Lukowski and Dr. Mork. 49 minutes.

If you are uncertain about your options, please meet with your advisor and see what might work for you! It’s worth considering!

MORE INFORMATION and How To Apply:

Computer Engineering, MS, PhD

Electrical Enginering, MS, PhD

ECE Accelerated Master’s program

Online Master’s in Power Systems

 


Biomedical Applications concentration – BSEE

The concentration in Biomedical Applications with the bachelor of science in electrical engineering helps prepare students to contribute as EE’s in the medical field, biomedical instrumentation, medical imaging and related areas.

The concentration may be pursued using the 2015-2016 catalog year or later.

Concentration coursework, 19 credits: (2015-2016)

BL2010 Anatomy & Physiology I
BE2400 Cellular & Molecular Biology
BL2020 Anatomy & Physiology II
BE3700 & 3701  Bio-Instrumentation and Lab
BE3300 or BE2800 Bomechanics I or Biomaterials I
Biomedical elective: BE3350, BE3800, BE4250, BE4610, BE4700, or EE4252

The Biomedical Applications concentration credits take the place of EE3120, approved electives, free elective and 9 cr. EE electives on the BSEE.

See Judy Donahue in EERC 131 for help with planning. Call 487-2550 to schedule and advising appointment.


FE Exam Information

Visit  ncees.org/exams for information regarding the FE exam, preparation, exam schedule, cost, and other details.

Computer engineers typically don’t take the FE exam.

For EE majors, becoming a PE (Professional Engineer) is not a requirement for most positions, but is desirable. It is required for consulting-type areas and for legal areas (legislature, public services commission or the courts).  Utilities, Architecture and Engineering (A and E) Firms may require PE registration for upper level positions.

First-year engineering courses, sophomore core courses plus your area(s) of specialty have helped prepare you.

EC3400 – Economic Decision Analysis is a good course to help prepare for the exam. It can count as an upper-level HASS elective or free elective.

EE4240 – Intro. to MEMS includes topics in micro electro mechanical systems that are helpful in preparation for the FE Exam as well. EE4240 applies to the BSEE as 4 credits of EE electives, or may apply as approved or free electives.  It can be a CpE technical elective for CpE’s.

Take the exam during your Senior year. You can study on your own following the topics described on the FE exam website.

Electrical and Computer CBT exam specifications

When will the CBT exams be offered?
The FE and FS will be administered during four testing windows throughout the year: January–February, April–May, July–August, and October–November. Registration will be open year-round.

Where will I take my CBT exam?
The exams will be administered at approved Pearson VUE testing centers:  at Michigan Tech, in the Library’s Jackson Center for Teaching and Learning.

What is professional engineering registration and why should I seek to be a registered professional engineer?

Some types of engineering jobs require professional registration. If you might start your own business and call yourself a consultant, most states require the PE designation. Consulting work and some types of design work are greatly facilitated by professional registration.

If you become a registered professional engineer, you may append the initials “P.E” after your name on your business cards.

The first step: To become a registered professional engineer you must first take the fundamentals of engineering exam administered by the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying.

Once you pass the FE exam, you become designated “engineer-intern”.  You remain in this status until you have practiced engineering for a designated number of years.  The amount of time you need to practice before becoming registered varies from state to state.  See the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying web site for details.