Alumna Aubrey Baker and a Viral Empowerment Message #ILookLikeAnEngineer

Computer Science alumna Aubrey Baker is part of the inspiring viral campaign ‪#‎ILookLikeAnEngineer‬. She was interviewed in an MLive article that featured her work downstate at CQL where she codes web applications. Baker also hosts a regular BitCamp event for middle school students and a semester-long Girls Who Code course.

Viral hashtag #ILookLikeAnEngineer inspires campaign in Michigan

Aubrey Baker was surprised that a woman in her field was called out for not belonging.

Still, Baker, 25, who writes software code at CQL, notes that when she was hired by the Grand Rapids firm in December, she was the only female web developer. Now, there are three.

Her interest in computers developed between middle school and high school. She was the person in her house who took care of the routers and fixed the computers when there were issues.

While a freshman at Reeths-Puffer High School in Muskegon, she took a networking class.

After graduating early with college credits, she finished her general education requirements at Muskegon Community College before transferring to Michigan Tech. She was familiar with the Upper Peninsula college after attending two weeklong summer programs there in high school.

Read more at MLive, by Shandra Martinez.

Tim Havens Presents on Fuzzy Systems

FUZZ IEEE 2015Tim Havens (ECE/CS) presented two papers at the IEEE Int. Conference on Fuzzy Systems in Istanbul, Turkey. The first paper was entitled, “Feature and Decision Level Fusion Using Multiple Kernel Learning and Fuzzy Integrals,” authored by ECE PhD student Anthony Pinar and coauthored by Havens and Derek Anderson and Lequn Hu from Mississippi State University. The second paper was authored by Titilope Adeyeba (Miss. State), Anderson and Havens, entitled, “Insights and Characterization of L1-Norm Based Sparsity Learning of a Lexicographically Encoded Capacity Vector for the Choquet Integral.” Havens also served as an Area Chair and Session Chair at the conference.

From Tech Today.

K-12 Teachers Computer Science Workshop at Tech

Google Computer Science for High SchoolTwenty school teachers from across Michigan will be at Michigan Tech for a three-day workshop Monday through Wednesday.

The workshop, called CS4all, will help teachers learn to integrate computer science and computational thinking into their classrooms.

Sponsored by grants from Google, the workshop is the first step toward establishing an online “community of practice” to introduce computer science principles into schools.

The workshop will cover topics such as What is Computational Thinking, Student Engagement Activities, Encouraging Diversity in Computing and Computing Careers in Local Industry.

A guest speaker, Shannon Houtrouw, is part of Tuesday morning’s program. He is a former professor and software systems engineer who has taught computer science at the Kalamazoo Area Math Science Center, a magnet school.

“Preparing students for life in a fully computerized 21st century is one of the most important problems facing educators today,” says Leo Ureel, a lecturer in computer science at Michigan Tech and organizer of the workshop. “We are working to build a grassroots community of K-12 teachers who will support each other in achieving this goal.”

Ureel and two other Tech computer science faculty members, Associate Professor Charles Wallace and Professor Linda Ott, will teach the workshop.

From Tech Today, by Jennifer Donovan.

CS4ALL CS4ALL CS4ALL CS4ALL

Michigan teachers learn all about computer science in Houghton

“Computer science is solely lacking from most k-12 educational opportunities,” says Michigan Tech University’s Computer Sciences Associate Dean, Linda Ott. “Particularly in the upper peninsula, very few schools offer any programming.”

Read more and watch the video at Upper Michigan’s Source, by Aleah Hordges.

Tech hosts computer science workshop for K-12 teachers

HOUGHTON – Computer science is one of the most useful skills a student can acquire as they prepare for the world.

Classes began with basic coding skills, including visual programming, where they input code not through language command, but by manipulating graphical elements.

“It’s easier to use, and it’s great for students, because the pieces of the code fit together like puzzle pieces, so you know if you’re putting things together correctly,” said Linda Ott, professor of computer science at Michigan Technological University and associate dean for special initiatives of the College of Sciences and Arts.

Read more at the Mining Gazette, by Garrett Neese (subscription required).

Min Song Chairs ICCCN

 

Min Song
Min Song

Min Song, Chair of Computer Sciences Department and Director of the Institute of Computing and Cybersystems, chaired the 24th International Conference on Computer Communications and Networks (ICCCN) held in Las Vegas in early August 2015. ICCCN is one of the leading international conferences for presenting novel ideas and fundamental advances in the fields of computer communications and networks. ICCCN serves to foster communication among researchers and practitioners with a common interest in improving communications and networking through scientific and technological innovation. Song was the panel chair of ICCCN 2014.

From Tech Today.

LIVE: Charles Wallace at White House Conference on Aging Monday Afternoon

2015 White House Conference on AgingProf. Charles Wallace was invited to the White House Conference on Aging because of his Breaking Digital Barriers project and the ongoing outreach to research, understand, and help bridge the technology gap experienced by older Americans. Wallace is participating on the Technology and the Future of Aging panel, which begins at 3:50pm July 13, 2015.

There is an official website for the White House Conference on Aging.
http://www.whitehouseconferenceonaging.gov

The conference is being streamed live at:
http://www.whitehouse.gov/live

Online@Library is a joint outreach project between the Michigan Technological University Computer Science Department and the Portage Lake District Library that provides free computer help. These computer help sessions with individual tutors are held every Saturday from 9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. at the library through August. Student volunteers show participants how to use the internet to keep in touch with people, share pictures and letters, find information, solve computer problems, and much more. Tutors help each participant with their own particular needs. People may attend as many of the sessions as they wish, and those who have devices (such as laptops, tablets, phones, cameras, etc.) may bring them. Online@Library is free and everyone is welcome.

More information can be found at the Breaking Digital Barriers website:
http://www.mtu.edu/bdb

Charles Wallace
Charles Wallace, center, attends the White House Conference on Aging.

Financial Engines’ CEO Lawrence Raffone a Panelist at the White House Conference on Aging

The panel addressed Technology and the Future of Aging, and was moderated by Jeff Zients, Director of the National Economic Council and Assistant to the President for Economic Policy. Other panelists included Susannah Fox, Chief Technology Officer of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; Rachel Holt, Regional General Manager, East Coast, at Uber; Tom Parkinson, Senior Vice President & Chief Technology Officer, at Peapod LLC; Charles Wallace, Associate Professor, Computer Science, at Michigan Technological University; and Donna Levin, Co-Founder & VP, Policy, CSR and Global Workplace Solutions, at Care.com. United States Secretary of Labor Tom Perez delivered the closing remarks.

Read More At Investor’s Business Daily: http://news.investors.com/newsfeed-business-wire/071315-141788954-financial-engines-ceo-lawrence-raffone-a-panelist-at-the-white-house-conference-on-aging.aspx#ixzz3fxX0xrdm
Follow them: @IBDinvestors on Twitter | InvestorsBusinessDaily on Facebook

Chuck Wallace Shares How to Break Digital Barriers at White House Conference

“We’re looking at this from the user perspective,” Wallace says. “And we’re hoping to take this from an outreach, educational opportunity to build in more of a research component to better understand what’s happening with these users.”

Read more at Michigan Tech News, by Allison Mills.

Aging Together: Students and seniors breaking down technology barriers

We’ll age out of the technology gap.

I think that’s an unspoken belief around helping seniors overcome technology barriers. Everyone today uses the Internet and owns a device. Barriers will fall as people of all ages get swept into the “cloud” and embrace the “Internet of Things.”

I may have felt the same until talking with Michigan Tech Professor Charles Wallace.

Read more at MLive, by Dustin Block.

Jeon Presents at International Conference on Auditory Display

ICAD 2015Myounghoon “Philart” Jeon (CLS/CS) and colleagues presented four research projects at the International Conference on Auditory Display (ICAD) in Graz, Austria: “Regulating drivers’ aggressiveness by sonifying emotional data,” “Subjective assessment of in-vehicle auditory warnings for rail grade crossings,” “Exploration of semiotics of new auditory displays: A comparative analysis with visual displays,” and “Cultural differences in preference of auditory emoticons: USA and South Korea.” Jeon also successfully hosted the workshop on “In-vehicle Auditory Interactions” at ICAD. This workshop was partly supported by MTTI.

From Tech Today.

ICAD 2015 – ICAD in Space: Interactive Spatial Sonification was held July 8-10.

New Associate Professor Spiros Bakiras

 

Spiros Bakiras
Spiros Bakiras

Spiros Bakiras received his B.S. degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the National Technical University of Athens, his M.S. degree in Telematics from the University of Surrey, and his Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Southern California. Prior to joining Michigan Tech, he was an associate professor in the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science at John Jay College, City University of New York. Before that, he held teaching and research positions at the University of Hong Kong and the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. His current research interests include database security and privacy, applied cryptography, and mobile computing. He is a recipient of the U.S. National Science Foundation CAREER award.