Computer Science in Top 18 in Nation

homepage_clouds_lgPayScale, a compensation analysis web site, has announced the top 25 university computer science programs in the country and Michigan Tech placed 18th.

In its 2016-2017 College Salary Report, Payscale ranked 171 colleges and universities with computer science programs based on the median early-career and mid-career pay of the schools’ computer science alumni. Tech’s early-career computer science salaries are listed at $63,900. Mid-career median pay is $126,000.

“This is great news. It is the best indicator of the quality of our programs,” said Min Song, chair of Computer Science.

Stanford University ranked number one in the nation, with its computer science graduates reporting a median early-career salary of $99,500 and mid-career salary of $168,000. Read the full report.

By Jenn Donovan

Alexander Larkin places 101 out of 3,449 in the National Cyber League (NCL)

My name is Alexander Larkin and I am currently finishing up my first semester, at Michigan Tech, as a Computer Science major.  I transferred from Waukesha County Technical College, WI where I spent a few years studying networking, programming, and cybersecurity.  During my first semester, at Michigan Tech, I competed in the NCL(National Cyber League) and placed 101st out of 3,449 competitors.  NCL is a cybersecurity competition that assesses an individual’s skill in cryptography, network traffic analysis, task automation, exploitation of vulnerable systems, and much more.  Participating in NCL is an incredible way to learn about cybersecurity concepts and is an absolutely great experience.  I began competing in NCL when I was sixteen years old.  I have continued to compete in most NCL games since that time and I always look forward to the next competition.  The competition gives a competitor a set of tasks to complete, via a clean and intuitive web interface.  For every task completed, points are given based on the difficulty of the task.  Sometimes the competition demands an individual learn about some strange technologies such as Voice-Over-IP.  During this last competition, I found myself researching how Voice-Over-IP works, so I could track phone calls, stored in a packet capture.  Every time I compete in NCL I find myself learning about cool technologies.  Over the years, I have learned how to become a master at the art of “Google-Fu”.  Over the years of competing, I have learned just how important it is to do research on unknown topics and technologies.  NCL also taught me that it is OK to not know something and to not admit defeat, but to do some research, learn the topic, and apply what I learn on the fly.  Learning how to “learn on the fly” has helped me immensely in all aspects of my life and is enormously valuable in Computer Science.  I would consider it to be a pseudo-required skill to possess in the dynamic world of computing.  I am happy to be competing in National Cyber League here at Michigan Tech and I am looking forward to competing in the Spring of 2018.  Additional information about National Cyber League can be found at www.nationalcyberleague.org.  I would like to personally thank Professor Min Song and Professor Bo Chen for providing faculty leadership during this last competition and I look forward to working with them again in the Spring.

Congratulations Alexander!



MTU Hosts International Collegiate Programming Contest (ICPC)

Saturday Oct. 28th Michigan Tech hosted a site of the North Central North American (NCNA) region of the International Collegiate Programming Contest (ICPC).  Locally, 11 teams competed, 7 from Michigan Tech and 4 from NMU.  Across the region there were 207 teams competing.  The top team in the region from South Dakota School of Mines solved 8 of the 10 problems in the five hour competition.  The following were the top three teams from Michigan Tech all solving 4 problems (full standings are available at: https://ncna17.kattis.com/standings) :
  • MTU White, region rank 12
    Anthony Marcich, 4th year Math major
    Nick Olinger, 3rd year Math major
    Jay Honnold, 4th year CS major
  • MTU Red, region rank 13
    Justin Evankovich, 4th year EE major
    Nicolas Muggio, 4th year Software Engineering major
    Antony Duda, 4th year CE major
  • MTU Purple, region rank 16
    Michael Lay, 3rd year Software Engineering major
    Marcus Stojcevich, 3rd year CS major
    Parker Russcher, 3rd year CS major

Two other teams, MTU Orange – Evan de Jesus, Paul Wrubel, Dylan Gaines and MTU – Black – Isaac Smith, Austin Walhof, Ryan Philipps, finished in the top 50 teams of the region.

Congratulations to all participants in this year’s event.
~Laura Brown, Associate Professor, Computer Science



ICC Distinguished Lecturer Series Tomorrow

ICC_Jie_wuThe Institute of Computing and Cybersystems (ICC) will host Jie Wu from 3 to 4 p.m. tomorrow (Sept. 22) in Rekhi 214.

He will present a lecture titled “Algorithmic Crowdsourcing and Applications in Big Data.” Refreshments will be served. Wu is director of Center for Networked Computing (CNC) and Laura H. Carnell Professor at Temple University. He served as the associate vice provost for International Affairs and chair in the Department of Computer and Information Sciences at Temple University.

Prior to joining Temple University, he was a program director at the National Science Foundation and was a distinguished professor at Florida Atlantic University. A full bio and abstract can be found online.


Associate Professor, Jeon, Receives Korea Automobile Testing and Research Institute Grant

MyounghoonJeon20140131_0001Philart’s grant is a 4-year award with a total budget of $350,000 from Korea Automobile Testing & Research Institute. Two graduate students will be supported by this grant each year. The project is titled “Development of the safety assessment technique for take‐over in automated vehicles.”

The goal of the project is to design and evaluate intelligent auditory interactions for improving safety and user experience in the automated vehicles. Research tasks include developing a driving simulator for automated driving model, modelling driver states in automated vehicles, design and evaluating discrete auditory alerts for safety purpose, and the development of real-time sonification systems for overall user experience. Congratulations Philart!

 


CS Assistant Professor, Jianhui Yue, Receives an NSF Award

Jianhui YueJianhui Yue’s grant is a 3-year NSF award with a total budget of $176,876. One PhD student will be supported for two years.  The project is titled “Improving Reliability of In-Memory Storage”. The project addresses two challenges of in-memory storage: 1) Memory cells have limited write endurance (i.e., the total number of program/erase cycles per cell), and 2) Nonvolatile memory has to remain in a consistent state in the event of a system crash or power loss.
This project will take a holistic approach, spanning from low-level architecture design to high-level OS management, to optimize the reliability, performance, and manageability of in-memory storage.
Congratulations!

Computer Science Learning Center Open House this Friday

The Computer Science Learning Center Open House

The CS Learning Center is hosting an Open House Friday, September 15th from 4-5pm. Stop by to see the new space and meet the coaches at our new location in Rekhi 118.

Light refreshments will be served. All are welcome.

IMG_1233The new CS Learning Center has more windows for natural lighting, bean bags and comfy chairs for informal help sessions, and all computers are equipped with dual monitors. With our new space comes the addition of more blended learning technologies; including a Mersive system that enables coaches and students to project the screens of their wireless devices to a 50-inch monitor, and a Promethean digital whiteboard allowing coaches and students to receive email images of the 70-inch screen after a tutoring session. The new equipment in the CS Learning Center was provided by the CTL/IT Distance Learning Grant Program with additional support from the CS Department. A special thanks goes to Dr. Robert Pastel for generously offering to move his lab, so the CS Learning Center could have a larger, more suitable space.


James Roznick receives the Department of Defense SMART Scholarship

Congratulations to Jimmy Roznick!  Jimmy is the recipient of the DOD SMART Scholarship.  “The SMART scholarship is a Department of Defense scholarship for service program aimed at supporting students in STEM fields. The scholarship covers the full cost of tuition and provides students with a monthly stipend. In return, students intern and work at a sponsoring facility for a number of years, equal to the amount of schooling sponsored.  I am very excited to be putting what I’ve learned at Michigan Tech to use for national security purposes.”, Jimmy said.  He will soon be graduating with a bachelor’s degree in Software Engineering as well as pursuing a master’s in CS.

Congrats!