Computer Science in Top 18 in Nation

homepage_clouds_lgPayScale, a compensation analysis web site, has announced the top 25 university computer science programs in the country and Michigan Tech placed 18th.

In its 2016-2017 College Salary Report, Payscale ranked 171 colleges and universities with computer science programs based on the median early-career and mid-career pay of the schools’ computer science alumni. Tech’s early-career computer science salaries are listed at $63,900. Mid-career median pay is $126,000.

“This is great news. It is the best indicator of the quality of our programs,” said Min Song, chair of Computer Science.

Stanford University ranked number one in the nation, with its computer science graduates reporting a median early-career salary of $99,500 and mid-career salary of $168,000. Read the full report.

By Jenn Donovan

Faculty/Graduate Student Hour

Each semster Computer Science graduate students are invited to meet with faculty to share their views about the department and the graduate programs, ask questions, and discuss anything else that is of interest. It is a good time to build connections between faculty and students, and create a collaborative environment.2Faculty-Graduate Student Hour meeting photo

Tommy Stuart Receives Second Place in Elevator Pitch Competition

14606260_1272887379411026_1795585242386597791_nCongratulations to Tommy Stuart for earning second place at the 2016 Bob Mark Elevator Pitch Competition on October 6.

His pitch, “Delving Deeply,” proposed to complete development of a single-player top-down action adventure style game, and eventually start a local game development studio to leverage the large population of knowledgeable computer science students in the area.

The game idea and pitch was cultivated in Husky Game Development Enterprise in which students develop video games and were required to pitch their game ideas to the Enterprise one week before the Bob Mark competition.

For winning second place out of the 25 pitches at the Bob Mark Elevator Pitch Competition, Tommy is receiving $1,000, a free ticket to Michigan Tech’s 2017 Silicon Valley Experience trip, Smartzone Virtual Client Membership, and a Smart Start Program Tuition Waiver.

Associate Professor Timothy Havens received a research award

Timothy HavensAssociate Professor Timothy Havens received a DoD Army Research Office research award with a budget of $99,779 during the first year.

This is also a 3-year project with a total budget of $1,066,799. The project is titled “Multisensor Analysis and Algorithm Development for Detection and Classification of Buried and Obscured Targets.”

Tim and his students will develop new algorithms to detect and classify buried objects, one of the important research areas for ARO.

Professor Zhenlin Wang received external funding

Zhenlin WangProfessor Zhenlin Wang received an NSF research award with a total budget of $375,000.

This is a 3-year project with a title of “CSR:Small: Effective Sampling-Based Miss Ratio Curves: Theory and Practice”. In this project, Zhenlin and his students will use miss ratio curves (MRCs), which relate cache miss ratio to cache size, to model working set and cache locality.

The project develops a new cache locality theory to construct MRCs effectively and then applies it to several caching or memory management systems.

Code Ninjas Workshop Saturday

1474851781The Code Ninjas Workshop for middle school girls is from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturday in Rheki 112.

Interested in virtual reality? Code Ninjas is for girls interested in programming computers, making and playing games,concerned about the environment and you.

Participants will learn about bees, learn to program in Processing, learn how their program can make a difference, talk to role models who program in their jobs and meet other young women interested in programming.

This workshop will focus on learning to program with an environmental theme: What is happening to the bees?  We will design 3D simulations and games around the theme of bees.

Then participants will view the games in an Oculus Rift interactive virtual reality. Included in the workshop are sessions teaching girls how to program computers, an expert will discuss the environmental crisis facing bees, and panel of programmers from industry will discuss their experiences.

The following is a tentative schedule for the workshop.

9 – 10:30 a.m. Introduction to 3D Programming

Students will learn to draw simple 3D shapes.  We will teach them how to use setup and draw methods, data types, and variables. Students will use graphics and colors to make a simple scene.

10:30 – 11a.m. Presentation about bees

A Michigan Tech student who studies hive-collapse disorder will talk to girls about things that impact bees, and how they can help bees to continue to pollinate our food supply.

11 a.m. – noon Programming with Objects

Girls will be introduced to objects and classes.  They will learn to use objects and the functions and variables inside of classes.  Girls will learn how to make a plan for their simulation and divide in into smaller steps that can be done sequentially.

Noon – 1:00 Lunch

1 – 2 p.m.  Programming

Girls will program their own simulations and will work by themselves or in small groups.

2 – 2:30 p.m. Role-model Interviews

Girls will meet women who have careers/educational backgrounds in computer science, and will be able to ask them questions.

2:30 – 3 p.m. Programming

Girls will continue programming their own simulations and will work by themselves or in small groups.

3:30 – 4:30 p.m. Oculus Showcase!

Girls will demo their code in the Oculus Rift.   Parents are welcome to come at 4:00 to see their daughter’s simulation.

4:30 p.m. Parent pick-up.

Sarah Larkin-Driscoll and Miriam Eikenberry-Ureel, local high school students and Michigan regional winners of the prestigious NCWIT Aspirations Award, will present the workshop. They aim to teach middle school girls how to write programs that can be displayed in a 3D space.

This workshop is sponsored by an AspireIT grant from the National Center for Women & Information Technology and facilitated by the Michigan Technological University Computer Science Department.

Read more at Tech Today.

Associate Professor Charles Wallace receives NSF funding for a 5-year project partnering with Arizona State, Penn State, and Rutgers

image45069-persAssociate Professor Charles Wallace received NSF funding through a 5-year project that has a total budget of $2,983,358 and involves researchers from Michigan Tech, Arizona State, Penn State, and Rutgers.

The project is titled “Climate Change Mitigation via Reducing Household Food, Energy and Water Consumption: A Quantitative Analysis of Interventions and Impacts of Conservation.” The PI is David Watkins in Civil and Environmental Engineering at Michigan Tech. Associate Professor Charles Wallace’s share of the budget is approximately $105,529 and includes grad student support in the 2017-2018 and 2018-2019 academic years, as well as four years of undergraduate student support.

He and his students will develop a software application that allows homeowners to monitor the environmental costs of their consumption.

This collaborative project not only supports our graduate and undergraduate students, but also helps promote the department’s internal and external visibility.

Soner Onder receives supplemental award to NSF grant

Soner OnderProfessor Soner Onder received an REU award in the amount of $15,876. This is a supplemental award to Soner’s NSF grant received last fall. Soner will support and guide two undergraduate students, in addition to his current PhD students.

Soner’s project will focus on the development of a new program execution paradigm and the establishment of a critical compiler and micro-architecture so that one can design processors that can be easily programmed using existing programming languages and at the same time surpass the performance of existing parallel computers.


Teachers plan to educate computer sciences to all ages

Tech+WorkshopHOUGHTON Teachers are spreading knowledge of computer science into their classrooms. More than 30 teachers are on Michigan Tech’s campus to learn how.

A three day workshop is taking place for teachers from all grade levels across the state and surrounding areas. They’re learning the basic understanding of computer science. Including programming and coding. Teachers are also being taught how to increase interest in computer science among girls.

“More women are becoming involved because they’re required to take computer science and they discover that they enjoy programming,” said workshop instructor, Linda Ott.

“When they’re not required to take it they often shy away from it and they don’t realize that they might be interested.”

Read more at Upper Michigan’s Source, by Aleah Hordges.