Category Archives: News

Master Student Andrea Baccarini describes his research work in the Azores

AndreaAndrea Baccarini is an Italian master student who graduated in Physics at the University of Trento in 2016. Andrea performed field research at the Pico Mountain Observatory in the Azores in collaboration with MTU faculty members. Recently, he described his field experience in the MTU “Unscripted: Science and Research” blog as a guest writer with an entry titled “On Top of the World“.

 

Probing Quantum Phenomena in Tiny Transistors

Nearly a thousand times thinner than a human hair, nanowires can only be understood with quantum mechanics. Using quantum models, physicists from Michigan Tech have figured out what drives the efficiency of a silicon-germanium (Si-Ge) core-shell nanowire transistor.

The study, published last week in Nano Letters, focuses on the quantum tunneling in a core-shell nanowire structure. Ranjit Pati (Physics) led the work along with his graduate students Kamal Dhungana and Meghnath Jaishi.

From Michigan Tech News, by Allison Mills

2016 REF Grants for Physics Faculty

The Vice President for Research Office announces the 2016 REF awards and thanks the review committees, the deans and department chairs for their time spent on this important internal research award process. Among the recipients are:

Infrastructure Enhancement (IE) Grants

Will Cantrell, Physics/EPSSI – Refrigerated Water Re-Circulating System

Research Seed (RS) Grants

Jae Yong Suh, Physics

From Tech Today, by VPR.

Shaw Wins Research Award

 

Raymond Shaw
Raymond Shaw

Congratulations to Raymond Shaw (Atmospheric Sciences, Physics) for winning the 2016 Research Award.

In the words of Ravi Pandey, chair of the Department of Physics, Shaw is “widely recognized in the national and international community of atmospheric scientists investigating cloud microphysical processes.”

His research is both detailed and big—from the minutiae of raindrops to understanding the patterns of cloud formation. As part of this research, he collaborates with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) to lead a team of scientists to conduct holographic imaging of cloud droplets from an airplane laboratory. The research was published in Science last fall and was the subject of a Michigan Tech Research Magazine story.

“The unifying aspect of my research is the atmosphere,” Shaw says, adding that the process of research inspires him. “It’s like working on an incredibly diverse set of intertwined and nested puzzles. Every now and then a burst of insight allows us to solve a part of one of them.”

Shaw is also recognized for his teaching and says that teaching is another aspect of research. “Students learn at a deeper level when they dig into a research problem,” he explains.

“The advisor-grad student relationship is the closest thing I know to an apprenticeship, where the grad student masters a craft by working side by side with a mentor.”

He considers Alex Kostinski (Physics) his own mentor who has helped him on Michigan Tech’s campus from day one. Along with Pandey’s support and the insight from his students, Shaw says, “Perhaps it sounds quaint, but I do feel like being recognized with the MTU research award is a larger recognition of the colleagues and students with whom I have worked.”

From Tech Today, by Allison Mills.

High School Students Explore Nanotechnology

Professor Yoke Khin Yap (Physics) held a workshop for ninth and tenth grade students from L’Anse High School on Monday. The theme of the workshop was “Introduction to Nanotechnology” and was part of the outreach and education activities in Yap’s research grant funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF).

This workshop was co-organized by Michigan Tech’s GEAR UP, a Pre-College Innovative Outreach Institute, with the assistance of Liz Fujita. The goal of the workshop was to help stimulate the interest of pre-college underrepresented groups (girls, students with disabilities, etc.). A total of 91 students and three teachers participated.

During the workshop, students were introduced to the concept of nanoscale and hands-on experience in making molecular structures. Following lunch, there was a discussion on the potential applications of nanoscale materials. “Since Michigan Tech is the only research-intensive university in the area, we regularly provide educational support to the local communities,” says Yap. This is one of the annual outreach events planned during the three-year NSF research project.

From Tech Today, by Yoke Khin Yap.