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    GenCyber Cybersecurity Teacher Camp Is July 19-23

    by Yu Cai, College of Computing

    A GenCyber Cybersecurity Teacher Camp for K-12 teachers will be held at Michigan Tech during the week of July 19 – 23. Participants will learn cyber hygiene and fundamental security knowledge including email phishing, password management, and cyber ethics. Participants will also learn how to develop lesson plans to teach cybersecurity in K-12.

    This is a residential camp (commuting optional), and is offered at NO COST to all participants. Room and board is included. Each teacher participant will receive a stipend of $500 for attending and completing camp activities. Camp activities will count for 25 State Continuing Education Clock Hours (SCECH).

    Click here for more information and to apply. The application deadline is May.

    Funding for the camp is provided jointly by the National Security Agency (NSA) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) through an award led by Yu Cai and Tim Van Wagner from the College of Computing.


    Our Stories: Dr. Nathir Rawashdeh

    This is part of a series of short introductions about College students, faculty, and staff. Would you like to be featured? Send a photo and some background info about yourself to computing@mtu.edu.

    Dr. Nathir Rawashdeh, Assistant Professor, Applied Computing

    • Affiliated Assistant Professor, Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering
    • Years teaching at Michigan Tech: 2
    • Years teaching overall: 12
    • Member, Data Sciences research group, Institute of Computing and Cybersystems (ICC)
    • Ph.D., Electrical Engineering, University of Kentucky, 2007
    • MS, Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, 2003
    • Faculty Profile

    Classes Dr. Rawashdeh Teaches

    • Programmable Logic Control (PLC)
    • Digital Electronics
    • Analog Electronics
    • Image Processing
    • Automatic Control Systems
    • Instrumentation and Measurement

    The “coolest” class you teach, and why:

    Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs), because every factory in the world is controlled by PLCs.

    The importance of your class topics to the overall understanding of Computing and your discipline: 

    Computing is the way of the future. And in all disciplines we rely more and more on sophisticated design, modeling, and control software. The Digital Electronics course is key to the overall understanding of computer systems. We discuss the building blocks of computers, and programmable logic controllers apply computing solutions for automation programming and industrial communication.

    Your teaching philosophy: 

    • I believe in the social connection between teacher and student because it enables them to learn from each other, and more than just technical material and information.
    • In today’s changing world, courses and delivery methods must be constantly updated to maximize learning in a wide sense. When teaching online, I always turn on my camera and teach from the classroom.
    • I interact actively with students, and when I see that they need a break I tell them a story from my professional or personal experience. In the labs, I am almost always engaged with students, helping them solve problems.

    Labs you direct and their general focus:

    • In the Programmable Logic Controllers labs (for introductory and advanced level courses), students learn how to program industrial controllers and interface with sensors and actuators.
    • In the Digital Electrics lab, students learn the building blocks of computers and program FPGA boards, which is the fastest programmable hardware possible.

    Research projects in which students are assisting: 

    • An ECE PhD student is working on sensor fusion for autonomous driving in the snow.
    • I plan to hire a graduate student this summer to implement indoor simultaneous location and mapping of a mobile robot.
    • Recently, an undergraduate EET student helped me build a virus sterilizing mobile robot that uses ultraviolet light. Read a news article, view photos and a YouTube video here.
    • In personal research, I also work on image analysis and industrial inspection research.

    Other cool things your students are doing:

    • Recent senior design projects include a gesture controlled robotic arm and a PID control system based on a levitating ball.
    • See more projects on my lab website: https://www.morolab.mtu.edu/students.

    Interests beyond teaching and research:

    • I am married and have four children. The eldest is studying Environmental Engineering at Tech.
    • I like cars and ground robots, painting, swimming, and playing soccer.
    • I speak three languages and have lived in four countries, in each for over a decade.

    Summer Youth Programs (SYP): Topics in Computing

    With extensive safety planning and health precautions underway, Michigan Tech Summer Youth Programs plans to offer in-person programs for summer 2021. Programs run weekly from June 21-August 7, 2021.

    Registration is now open for 2021 Summer Youth Programs. Many classes are already full, but there are plenty more to choose from

    Interested in computing-related classes? Below are SYP programs of particular interest.

    Explore the SYP website and see all SYP classes here.

    Computing Programs
    Class NumberTitleAdditional Cost RequiredSeats AvailableGradesWeek
    51400App and Web Development: Designing for Humans129 – 11July 18 – July 24
    51890Coding for the Internet of ThingsSee Course Details129 – 11July 11 – July 17
    51678Coding for the Internet of ThingsSee Course Details129 – 11June 20 – June 26
    52422Introduction to Computational Physics159 – 11June 20 – June 26
    51204Introduction to Video Game Programming126 – 8June 27 – July 03
    51541Video Game Programming79 – 11July 18 – July 24
    Engineering Programs
    Class No.Class TitleAdd’l CostsSeats Avail.Grade LevelDates of Class
    52409AI & Machine LearningNone89-11July 18 – July 24
    52199The Gaming Industry Wants You!None69-11June 27 – July 3
    52410Intro to the Perfect MachineNone76-8July 18 – July 24
    52412The Perfect MachineNone209-11July 11 – July 17
    51909Electrical and Computer EngineeringSee Course Details79-11June 27 – July 3
    52092Electrical and Computer EngineeringSee Course Details119-11June 20 – June 26
    51190Electrical and Computer EngineeringSee Course Details59-11July 11 – July 17
    Scholarship Programs
    51435Women in Computer Science (WICS)None179-11June 27 – July 3
    Science and Technology Programs
    52199The Gaming Industry Wants You!None69-11June 27 – July 3


    Register Early for Summer ’21 CS, EET, SAT Classes



    The College of Computing will offer the following CS, EET, and SAT classes this summer.

    Please register early. Any courses with insufficient enrollment by April 5, 2021, may not be offered this summer.

    Link to registration information here.


    CS Classes – Summer 2021


    CS 1111, Intro to Programming in C/C++
    CRN 52293 | Lab | Instructor: Zhang
    Dates: 05/10 – 06/24 | Location: Online

    CS 1111, Intro to Programming in C/C++
    CRN 52292 | 3 credits | Instructor: Zhang
    Dates: 05/10 – 06/24 | Location: Online

    CS 1121, Intro to Programming I
    CRN 50686 | Lab | Instructor: Pomerville
    Dates: 05/10 – 06/24 | Location: Online

    CS 1121, Intro to Programming I
    CRN 50685 | 3 credits | Instructor: Pomerville
    Dates: 05/10 – 06/24 | Location: Online

    CS 1122, Intro to Programming II
    CRN 52211 | Lab | Instructor: TBA
    Dates: 05/10 – 06/24 | Location: Online

    CS 1122, Intro to Programming II
    CRN 51645 | 3 credits | Instructor: TBA
    Dates: 05/10 – 06/24 | Location: Online

    CS 1142, Programming at HW/SW Interface
    CRN 51744 | 3 credits | Instructor: Vertanen
    Dates: 05/10 – 06/24 | Location: Online

    CS 2321, Data Structures
    3 credits | Instructor: Adhikary | Dates: 05/10 – 06/24 | Location: Online

    NEW!
    CS 4321, Intro to Algorithms
    CRN 52294| 3 credits | Instructor: Wang
    Dates: 05/10 – 06/24 | Location: Online

    NEW!
    CS 4710, Model-driven Software Development
    CRN 51745 |3 credits | Instructor: Ebnenasir
    Dates: 05/10 – 06/24 | Location: Online


    SAT Classes, Summer 2021


    SAT 1700, Cyber Ethics
    CRN 52303 | 3 credits | Instructor: Arney
    Dates: 05/10 – 06/ 24 | Location: Online

    SAT 2343, Network Administration I
    CRN 51963 | Lab | Instructor: Van Wagner
    Dates: 05/10 – 06/ 24 | Location: Online

    SAT 2343, Network Administration I
    CRN 51962 | 4 credits | Instructor: Van Wagner
    Dates: 05/10 – 06/ 24 | Location: Online

    SAT 2511, Microsoft System Admin
    CRN 51529 | Lab | Instructor: Arney
    Dates: 05/10 – 06/ 24 | Location: Online

    SAT 2511, Microsoft System Admin
    CRN 51528 | 4 credits | Instructor: Arney
    Dates: 05/10 – 06/ 24 | Location: Online

    SAT 2711, Linux Fundamentals
    CRN 51531 | Lab | Instructor: Arney
    Dates: 05/10 – 06/ 24 | Location: Online

    SAT 2711, Linux Fundamentals
    CRN 51530 | 4 credits | Instructor: Arney
    Dates: 05/10 – 06/ 24 | Location: Online

    SAT 3310, Scripting Admin and Automation
    CRN 51965 | Lab | Instructor: Arney
    Dates: 05/10 – 06/ 24 | Location: Online

    SAT 3310, Scripting Admin and Automation
    CRN 51964 | 3 credits | Instructor: Arney
    Dates: 05/10 – 06/ 24 | Location: Online

    SAT 3611, Infrastructure Service Admin
    CRN 51594 | Lab | Instructor: Arney
    Dates: 05/10 – 06/ 24 | Location: Online

    SAT 3611, Infrastructure Service Admin
    CRN 51593 | 3 credits | Instructor: Arney
    Dates: 05/10 – 06/ 24 | Location: Online

    SAT 3820, Wireless System Administration
    CRN 51533 | Lab | Instructor: Van Wagner
    Dates: 05/10 – 06/ 24 | Location: Online

    SAT 3820, Wireless System Administration
    CRN 51532 | 4 credits | Instructor: Van Wagner
    Dates: 05/10 – 06/ 24 | Location: Online

    SAT 4816, Digital Forensics
    CRN 52164 | Lab | Instructor: Van Wagner
    Dates: 05/10 – 06/ 24 | Location: Online

    SAT 4816, Digital Forensics
    CRN 52163 | 3 credits | Instructor: Van Wagner
    Dates: 05/10 – 06/ 24 | Location: Online



    EET Classes- Summer 2021


    EET 1120, Circuits I
    CRN 52221 | Lab | Instructor: Hazaveh
    Dates: 05/10 – 06/24 | Location: TBA

    EET 1120, Circuits I
    CRN 52220 | 4 credits | Instructor: Hazaveh
    Dates: 05/10 – 06/24 | Location: TBA

    EET 2141, Digital/Microprocessor Basics
    CRN 52297 | Lab | Instructor: Hazaveh
    Dates: 06/28 – 08/12 | Location: Online

    EET 2141, Digital/Microprocessor Basics
    CRN 52296 | 4 credits | Instructor: Hazaveh
    Dates: 06/28 – 08/12 | Location: Online

    EET 2233, Electrical Machinery
    CRN 51429 | Lab | Instructor: Sergeyev
    Dates: 05/10 – 06/24 | Location: TBA

    EET 2233, Electrical Machinery
    CRN 51428 | 4 credits | Instructor: Sergeyev
    Dates: 05/10 – 06/24 | Location: TBA

    EET 3373, Intro to Prog Controllers
    CRN 52141 | Lab | Instructor: Rawashdeh
    Dates: 05/10 – 06/24 | Location: 07 0427

    EET 3373, Intro to Prog Controllers
    CRN 52140 | 3 credits | Instructor: Rawashdeh
    Dates: 05/10 – 06/24 | Location: 07 0316

    EET 3390, Power Systems
    CRN 52302 | 3 credits | Instructor: Sergeyev
    Dates: 05/10 – 06/24 | Location: Online

    EET 4144, Real-Time Robotics Systems
    CRN 52170 | Lab | Instructor: Sergeyev
    Dates: 05/03 – 05/14 | Location: 07 0427A

    EET 4144, Real-Time Robotics Systems
    CRN 52169 | 4 credits | Instructor: Sergeyev
    Dates: 05/03 – 05/14 | Location: 07 0427

    EET 4311, Advanced Circuits and Controls
    CRN 52299 | Lab | Instructor: Hazaveh
    Dates: 06/28 – 08/12 | Location: Online

    EET 4311, Advanced Circuits and Controls
    CRN 52298 | 4 credits | Instructor: Hazaveh
    Dates: 06/28 – 08/12 | Location: Online

    EET 5144, Real-Time Robotics Systems
    CRN 52172 | Lab | Instructor: Sergeyev
    Dates: 05/03 – 05/14 | Location: 07 0427A

    EET 5144, Real-Time Robotics Systems
    CRN 52171 | 4 credits | Instructor: Sergeyev
    Dates: 05/03 – 05/14 | Location: 07 0427

    EET 5311, Advanced Circuits and Controls
    CRN 52301 | Lab | Instructor: Hazaveh
    Dates: 06/28 – 08/12 | Location: Online

    EET 5311, Advanced Circuits and Controls
    CRN 52300 | 4 credits | Instructor: Hazaveh
    Dates: 06/28 – 08/12 | Location: Online


    Academic Calendar, Summer 2021

    Mon., May 10, Session A Begins
    Mon., May 10, Full Session Begins
    Mon., May 31, Memorial Day Recess
    Tues., Jun 01, Classes Resume
    Thurs., Jun 24, Session A Ends
    Fri., Jun 25, Session A Exams
    Mon., Jun 28, Session B Begins
    Mon., Jul 05, Independence Day Recess
    Tues., Jul 06, Classes Resume
    Thurs., Aug 12, Session B Ends
    Thurs., Aug 12, Full Session Ends
    Fri., Aug 13, Final Exam Period



    EET Motorized Swing Senior Project: The Students


    Read Part I of this article: EET Senior Design Project to Help Child Rest Easy


    by Karen S. Johnson, Communications Director, College of Computing

    Four senior-level Electrical Engineering Technology (EET) students are working on a Senior Design project with an altruistic focus, designing and producing a motorized swing set that will help a disabled child enjoy herself and sleep comfortably.

    Tackling the project top to bottom, the students are designing the electrical system, control and drive systems, and portions of the mechanical design. Their top priority is making sure the systems and mechanical structure are safe.

    Read about how the students are accomplishing this complex project below.

    Professor Alex Sergeyev and Lecturer Paniz Hazaveh are co-advisors to the team. “The students are very excited about the project,” Sergeyev says. “It’s very meaningful to them.”

    Specifications for the swing include that it be lightweight, reliable, and portable. The unit is battery-operated with a rechargeable lithium-ion battery. The swing will both rock the child to sleep and serve as a play toy for three to four years, although the actual lifetime of the swing will be much longer.

    “The skills that we are teaching in the EET and Mechatronics undergraduate programs makes students able to just jump on these kinds of projects,” Sergeyev says. “It’s great to see that their learning can be applied to a project as complex as this one.”


    Joe Barbercheck, ’21

    Major: Electrical Engineering Technology
    Minor: Data Acquisition and Industrial Controls
    Teaching Assistant for the EET department
    Member and 4th-Year Representative, Student Affairs Committee, Undergraduate Student Government
    Hometown: Petoskey, Mich.

    For Barbercheck, the EET Senior Design project is an excellent opportunity to further hone his mechanical and electrical design skills. “Plus, we are doing a good thing for someone less fortunate,” he adds.

    Barbercheck says that the project has definitely upped his game in CAD, and as the project progresses, he’ll need to focus on his mechanical skills in order to build any custom parts, and work on his electrical skills to help diagnose any electrical issues.

    The success of that structural analysis, which came back with little to no flaws, was an especially exciting development for Barbercheck. He says that a community college class in CNC machining helped immensely with thinking mechanically at the beginning of the project.

    “As we transition from mechanical design to electrical, my undergraduate MTU courses will come into play much more heavily,” he predicts. “The number of circuits we have constructed in each EET class’s lab, as well as knowledge gained in our electrical machinery class, will no doubt streamline the design phase of the electrical system.”

    “As for the most frustrating part of the project, I would have to say it is the number of times we have re-designed the model. While not hard to do in CAD, it is time consuming!” Barbercheck notes.

    Barbercheck says he learns best when he can work hands-on with class material. That’s why he chose the EET major. “Almost every class has a lab portion attached to it,” he explains. “The small class sizes also help, as professors are able to ensure we are learning everything, and they can spot students’ trouble areas easier than in larger majors.”

    “Professor Sergeyev and Paniz Hazaveh have been extremely helpful in providing feedback as we progress with our project,” says Barbercheck. “They are ensuring that we are dotting all our i’s and crossing all our t’s, especially when it comes to the mechanical design.”

    Barbercheck intends to pursue a career in the energy industry, a topic he identifies as of extreme interest to him, and a sector in which he has completed internship experiences.


    Seth Cherry ’21

    Major: Electrical Engineering Technology, 4th year
    Future plans: Seek a position in research and development, or one that that will involve the programming and utilization of PLC

    Seth Cherry says that the EET Senior Design project, “has allowed me to revisit and become even more familiar with CAD 3D design software, a skill I gained earlier in my tenure at MTU.”

    The EET team meets weekly with their advisors, Professor Sergeyev and Lecturer Paniz Hazaveh, to talk over recent developments and ideas and hear their advisors’ input.

    Cherry says, “This leads to improvements and further development of the overall design, as well as much more experienced eyes looking over our work to find anything that we may have overlooked that could become an issue later down the line.”

    “Because the EET department at MTU is fairly small, it allows for all of the students in each graduating class to network well with one another,” Cherry says. “I believe that this has been very beneficial to our group, as all four of us know each other and our two advisors very well.”


    Heather Harris ‘21

    Major: Electrical Engineering Technology
    Hometown: Kingsford, Mich.

    Heather Harris credits a high school pre-engineering and robotics course as the spark for her interest in the Electrical Engineering Technology (EET) degree program, because that’s where she “got to design and build robots, create circuit boards, and learn a whole host of other engineering fundamentals.”

    And, since she’s from the Upper Peninsula, Michigan Tech was the perfect place to continue on the electrical engineering path. “I chose EET in particular because it is more of a hands-on degree than EE, which is something I rather enjoy,” she says.

    The past three summers, Harris worked for Systems Control at their Iron Mountain location, and she currently works in the company’s Houghton office. And as soon as she graduates in spring 2021, she’ll start full time as an electrical testing engineer at the company’s Iron Mountain location.

    “I’m very excited about this project because it has a tangible impact on someone’s life that I do not normally see with other projects I have worked on,” says Harris.

    While Harris hasn’t before worked on a project exactly like this one, she feels that the Michigan Tech EET program has adequately prepared her for the challenges of managing and executing a project that requires new knowledge and skills.

    “I have worked in groups, and I know how to manage my time for these projects without a set class time,” Harris confirms. “Several of my classes have focused on motors as well as other programming languages, so I am not entirely unprepared to incorporate them into this project.”

    For Harris, the most exciting development so far has been figuring out how to make the swing move the way it should without needing the motors to run in reverse. The most frustrating part has been to find a motor that has the needed torque capabilities that will not require additional gearing and/or disassemble the motor from a different tool.

    Among the skills Harris has developed further on this project are documentation and report writing. “For every report and all the accounts of what the group did, I am in charge of making sure that is accurately outlined,” she explains. “I also make sure that the group has each of their own tasks for the week, and they know where to find all the information we had previously discussed.”

    Each individual on the team has a particular job or role, but these will change frequently through the course of the project, Harris says. Her role, however, is much more defined since she writes all the reports and keep everyone on track week-to-week.

    “I have also become familiar with motors, force calculations, and other information related to how our motorized swing set will move,” Harris adds. “As we continue with the project, I will need to become more familiar with programming and additional electrical work needed to make the swing run smoothly.”

    “Professor Sergeyev has been an incredible help throughout this project, both for feedback as well as direction for the week-to-week work,” says Harris. “And since he was the one to correspond with the mother, he has the most knowledge of what we should achieve and how we need to go about this.”

    “Lecturer Paniz Hazaveh has also been a great help with this project,” Harris adds. “She provides great feedback on the work we have completed, and sharing additional details that could be overlooked.”


    Cole Kubick ‘21

    • Major: Electrical Engineering Technology, 5th year
    • Minor: Data Acquisition and Industrial Controls
    • Hometown: Iron Mountain, Mich.
    • For Fun: Plays tuba and sousaphone in the Huskies Pep Ban for the last five years
    • Future Plans: On track to graduate in Spring 2021 with my BS in EET. I plan on finding a job upon graduation.

    While the EET Senior Design project is meant for a specific person, Kubick notes that it addresses a notable lack in the marketplace: swing sets made to accommodate older children, and more broadly a lack of alternative options for people with a variety of disabilities.

    “I also like that I am providing an option that was otherwise not available to this family,” he adds.

    For Kubick, investigating and learning to use the Raspberry Pi operating system and writing code in Arduino, an open-source electronics software platform, have been especially exciting. He says he finds the concepts very convenient, and he likes the simplicity of implementation. He adds that searching and selecting the motor has been the most frustrating, given the complexity of the system.

    Kubick’s focus is on the software, though he has also spent a fair amount of time researching software components and motors. He says he feels comfortable understanding which parts need to be researched, as well as building a presentation at the end of the semester.

    “We have a general role that each person is supposed to focus towards, though we often cross roles depending on the state of the project.,” Kubick says. “This allows us to individually work on different aspects of the project, while having checks and balances in place to confirm the information and choices we make. It helps eliminate errors and time waste.”

    “Professor Sergeyev and Lecturer Paniz Hazaveh have been a driving force in focusing our attention to specific areas of the project,” Kubick says. “They are also helping to identify which parts need more time spent on its research and they’re our contact with the recipient family.”

    Kubick started classes at Michigan Tech in fall 2016, majoring in Electrical Engineering. He recalls that when he took a required chemistry course he got a good sense of how much he prefers labs and hands-on learning over purely theoretical topics.

    So, he switched to Electrical Engineering Technology, as he understood that the major was more lab-based and less theoretical. “I have been very happy with that decision,” he confirms.

    Kubick grew up helping his Dad, who owns an aircraft maintenance business and is very handy. He did a lot of hands-on work at that business and discovered that he enjoys finding unique answers to different problems.


    Read Part I of this article: EET Senior Design Project to Help Child Rest Easy


    EET Senior Design Project to Help Child Rest Easy

    By Karen S. Johnson, Communications Director, College of Computing

    Read Part II of this article, “EET Motorized Swing Senior Project: The Students.”

    Professor Alex Sergeyev, Applied Computing, was reading an American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) Engineering Technology Division magazine last summer when he saw an article that prompted an idea for an Electrical Engineering Technology (EET) undergraduate Senior Design project.

    Sergeyev and Applied Computing Lecturer Paniz Hazaveh are advisors to the team.

    The story begins with a mother’s wish to help her child get a good night’s sleep. Her three-year-old daughter has a spinal disorder that leaves the child unable to walk, sit up, or lie down comfortably, especially for long periods of time. Children or adults with this type of disability find it very difficult to fall asleep, and the motion of a swing helps bring restful sleep. Mom was getting tired, too.

    “We have to help!”

    The mother had reached out to a community college in her area, asking faculty there if their students might be interested in designing and producing a motorized swing set that would allow her daughter to enjoy herself and sleep comfortably without being limited by her parents’ stamina. Unfortunately, the community college was unable to take on the project, and that may have been the end of the story

    But when Sergeyev saw the ASEE article, he said to himself, “We have to help!”

    So, he sent a message to the publication, who put him in touch with the community college. And eventually, Sergeyev talked with the mother of the child, collected the needed data, and discussed her design preferences, such as the direction, amplitude, and frequency of the swing’s arc. The project is funded entirely by University friends and donors.

    A meaningful, complex project.

    Four senior-level EET students are working on the project. Sergeyev and Applied Computing Lecturer Paniz Hazaveh are co-advisors to the team. “The students are very excited about the project,” says Sergeyev. “It’s very meaningful to them.”

    “The skills that we are teaching in the EET and Mechatronics undergraduate programs makes students able to just jump on these kinds of projects,” Sergeyev says. “It’s great to see that their learning can be applied to a project as complex as this one.”

    Specifications for the swing include that it be lightweight, reliable, and portable. The unit is battery-operated with a rechargeable lithium-ion battery. The swing will both rock the child to sleep and serve as a play toy for three to four years, although the actual lifetime of the swing will be much longer.

    The students are tackling the project top to bottom, designing the electrical system, control and drive systems, and portions of the mechanical design. Their top priority is making sure the systems and mechanical structure are safe. With the assistance of mechanical engineering graduate student Pratik Korgaonkar, complex structural and stress analysis was successfully completed, confirming the design’s feasibility and structural stability.

    Keeping things balanced.

    Each student on the team has assigned roles to keep the workload balanced. Heather Harris manages the project, writes reports, and keeps everyone organized and on deadline. Joe Barbercheck leads the mechanical design and 3D CAD modeling. Seth Cherry works on sourcing parts and assists with CAD design. And Cole Kubick has been tasked with finding a motor within spec and figuring out a way to drive the motor electrically using pulse width modulation, a method of reducing the average power delivered by an electrical signal, by essentially splitting the power into discrete parts.

    “The challenge is to create a swing that is rigid, because she is not capable of pumping a swing on her own, and because the mother does not have the energy to swing her for hours at a time,” explains Heather Harris. “We have designed it so that the car seat the child normally sits in will be attached to the swing, and a handheld controller will determine the height and speed of the swing.”

    The motorized swing is also designed for ease of disassembly so that it can be moved from one location to another. Seth Cherry says that initially the frame was designed to be collapsible, but the team moved away from that to a more rigid, structurally sound design, one that can be easily disassembled with the removal of a few key parts.

    The Senior Design team is working to build their first prototype by late February or early March. They would like to deliver the finished swing to the mother and child as soon as possible.

    Sergeyev says that a scholarly paper will be published with the results of the project. “It’s not a rare disease, so the design could be replicated for other children and perhaps used in playgrounds.”

    Part II of this article, “EET Motorized Swing Senior Project: The Students,” will be published on this blog next week.