Category: Cybersecurity

Sidike Paheding, AC, Awarded R-D Grant by Purdue University


Sidike Paheding (AC/ICC) is the principal investigator on a project that has received a $19,037 research and development grant from Purdue University. The two-year project is titled, “Cybersecurity Modules Aligned with Undergraduate Computer Science and Engineering Curricula.”

The project aims to serve the national interest by improving how cybersecurity concepts are taught in undergraduate computing curricula.

The grant is a sub-award of a $159,417 Purdue University NSF project . View that project here.


Abstract

This project aims to serve the national interest by improving how cybersecurity concepts are taught in undergraduate computing curricula. The need to design and maintain cyber-secure computing systems is increasingly important. As a result, the future technology workforce must be trained to have a security mindset, so that they consider cybersecurity during rather than after system design. This project aims to achieve this goal by building plug-and-play, hands-on cybersecurity modules for core courses in Computer Engineering, and Computer Science and Engineering. The modules will align with the curricula recommended by the Association for Computing Machinery and will be designed for easy adoption into computing programs nationwide. Modules will be designed for integration into both introductory and advanced courses, thus helping students develop in-depth understanding of cybersecurity as they progress through their computing curriculum. It is expected that the project will encourage more students to pursue careers or higher degrees in the field of cybersecurity.

The project will examine how the modules may be best integrated into existing curricula and the effects of the modules on student learning and interest in cybersecurity. Assessment will leverage several methods including (a) a task load index to quantify rigor, (b) surveys to gain insight into the development of students’ security mindset and perceptions of cybersecurity, and (c) analysis of learning using analytical course rubrics. Deliverables of this project will include a suite of plug-and-play cybersecurity modules for Computer Engineering and Computer Science and Engineering courses that span from introductory to advanced levels and that meet standards for content breadth and depth. The results will be disseminated through publications, presentations, press releases, and social media to ensure that project outcomes are shared widely. The NSF Improving Undergraduate STEM Education: Education and Human Resources Program supports research and development projects to improve the effectiveness of STEM education for all students. Through the Engaged Student Learning track, the program supports the creation, exploration, and implementation of promising practices and tools.


Congratulations Class of 2021!

It has been a challenging academic year, to say the least. As part of the Class of 2021, you are an exceptional group of graduates. Your final academic year presented you with unforeseen and unprecedented challenges, yet you persevered.

We are all proud to have mentored, instructed, and supported you on your educational journey. We know you’ll do well. You are a Husky, after all!

Please stay in touch!


RedTeam Achieves Breakthrough in NCL Cybersecurity Competition

The 23 members of the Michigan Tech RedTeam achieved a historic breakthrough in the Spring 2021 National Cyber League (NCL) competition.

The primary team finished the capture-the-flag (CTF) team competition 3rd Place in the overall ranking (tied for 1st Place in score). More than 900 teams from across the country participated in the CTF.

Students on the primary team are: Trevor Hornsby, Dakoda Patterson, Stu Kernstock, Matthew Chau, Ryan Klemm, Shane Hoppe, and Joshua Stiebel.

Further, of the 4,180 individual players competing in this spring’s NCL, four RedTeam players ranked in the Top 100: Trevor Hornsby (50th Place), Dakoda Patterson (59th), Stu Kernstock (75th), and Matthew Chau (100th).

“Amazing achievements!” said Dr. Bo Chen, Computer Science. “We are proud of you guys!” Chen, along with Dr. Yu Cai, Applied Computing, are advisors to the student organization.

The biannual NCL cybersecurity competition, for college and high school students, consists of a series of individual and team challenges, which present opportunities for students to prepare and test themselves against practical cybersecurity knowledge and skills, such as identifying hackers from forensic data, pentesting and auditing vulnerable websites, and recovering from ransomware attacks.

RedTeam is a registered Michigan Tech student organization. The team works to promote a security-driven mindset among students, and provide a community and resource for those wishing to learn more about information security.

Interested in cybersecurity? RedTeam meets every Thursday, 6:00-7:00 p.m., in Discord. Students with little or no background in cybersecurity are welcome. Contact the Red Team (redteam@mtu.edu) for more information.


GenCyber Teacher Camp Is July 19-23, 2021


An NSA/NSF GenCyber Cybersecurity Teacher Camp for K-12 teachers will take place at Michigan Tech the week of July 19 – 23, 2021. The residential camp is offered at no cost to all participants.

Topics include fundamental security knowledge, cyber hygiene, and other topics such as email phishing, password management, and cyber ethics. Participants will also learn how to develop lesson plans to teach cybersecurity in K-12.

Room and board are included. Each teacher participant will receive a stipend of $500 for attending and completing camp activities. Commuting is also possible. Camp activities will count for 25 State Continuing Education Clock Hours (SCECH).

Find complete details and apply here.  The application deadline is May 1, 2021.

Funding of the camp is provided jointly by the National Security Agency (NSA) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) through a grant award led by Professor Yu Cai and Tim Van Wagner, both from the College of Computing Department of Applied Computing.

Watch a video from the 2019 GenCyber Teacher Camp below.

Gencyber Teacher Camp @ Michigan Tech 2019


Assistants, Helpers Needed for Cybersecurity Teacher Camp, July 19-23


Dr. Yu Cai, Applied Computing, is seeking motivated students to help with this summer’s GenCyber Teacher Camp, which takes place on campus July 19-23, 2021.

  1. Twenty K-12 teachers attending the camp.
  2. Students will work as teaching assistants and camp helpers. They will set up the lab, help during hands-on activities and games, manage the website, and help the assessment. Students will be paid for 3 weeks of work during July.
  3. Contact Dr. Yu Cai (cai@mtu.edu) for details and to apply.

GenCyber Cybersecurity Teacher Camp Is July 19-23

by Yu Cai, College of Computing

A GenCyber Cybersecurity Teacher Camp for K-12 teachers will be held at Michigan Tech during the week of July 19 – 23. Participants will learn cyber hygiene and fundamental security knowledge including email phishing, password management, and cyber ethics. Participants will also learn how to develop lesson plans to teach cybersecurity in K-12.

This is a residential camp (commuting optional), and is offered at NO COST to all participants. Room and board is included. Each teacher participant will receive a stipend of $500 for attending and completing camp activities. Camp activities will count for 25 State Continuing Education Clock Hours (SCECH).

Click here for more information and to apply. The application deadline is May.

Funding for the camp is provided jointly by the National Security Agency (NSA) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) through an award led by Yu Cai and Tim Van Wagner from the College of Computing.