Tag: Industrial Heritage and Archaeology

Cyber Citizens article published in UP news website

Upper Peninsula Second Wave, a UP news website, published article about Michigan Tech’s Cyber Citizens and their development of a citizen scientist smartphone application called EthnoApp.

The Cyber Citizens project goal is to build smartphone apps and websites that connect average citizens with scientists to help acquire valuable environmental information across the world.

A team of graduate and undergrad students at Tech led by Alex Mayer, a professor of civil and environmental engineering, and Robert Pastel, a professor of computer science, have worked to develop four different apps so far.

For more on the article, click here

Published in Tech Today


New Dissertations in the Library

The Graduate School is pleased to announce new dissertations are now available in the J.R. van Pelt and Opie Library from the following programs:

  • Chemical Engineering
  • Biological Sciences
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Civil Engineering
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Engineering Physics
  • Forest Science
  • Geophysics
  • Industrial Heritage and Archaeology
  • Materials Science and Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics
  • Rhetoric and Technical Communication


Archaeology for Everybody: Summer School at the Cliff Mine

Ever had an Indiana Jones fantasy? Now is your chance to indulge it.  During the first summer session, Tech students and those from other colleges and universities, high school students and community seniors are all being invited to apply for the Cliff Mine Project’s fourth field research season.  Participants will help the University’s industrial archaeologists document the historic copper mine found along the 200-foot greenstone bluff that runs up the spine of the Keweenaw Peninsula.

The “Cliff Vein” produced more than 38 million pounds of refined copper over a 40 year period, paying dividends to its investors totaling $2.5 million.  People working in the mine and living in the town of Clifton transformed the social and technological practices of mining, starting America’s first successful industrial mining boom.

The field research project runs from May 13 through June 28, led by Associate Professors Timothy Scarlett and Samuel Sweitz (Social Sciences), working closely with project archaeologists Sean Gohman and Lee Presley.

“Learning archaeological fieldwork is an immersive experience where teamwork is essential,” Scarlett said.  “It takes weeks of work before a person can begin assembling the clues from each discovery into meaningful pictures of the past. Students should expect the work to be exacting, often slow and physically challenging.”  Those accepted into the course will be expected to work 8-hour days, 5 days a week throughout the 6-week course.

The course can be taken for undergraduate or graduate credit, at the regular undergraduate or graduate cost per credit hour.  It can be audited as a lifelong learning experience at no fee for seniors.

Information about class registration and costs can be found at registration/costs.

Explore the Cliff Mine research blog, which archives information from several years of fieldwork and research, at blog.

Published in Tech Today by Jenn Donovan, public relations director


New theses available in the Library

The Graduate School is pleased to announce new theses are now available in the J.R. van Pelt and Opie Library from the following programs:

  • Biological Sciences
  • Chemical Engineering
  • Chemistry
  • Civil Engineering
  • Computer Engineering
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Policy
  • Geology
  • Industrial Archaeology
  • Mathematical Sciences
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Rhetoric and Technical Communication


New theses available in the Library

The Graduate School is pleased to announce new theses are now available in the J.R. van Pelt and Opie Library from the following programs:

  • Biological Sciences
  • Chemical Engineering
  • Chemistry
  • Civil Engineering
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Environmental Engineering Science
  • Forestry
  • Geological Engineering
  • Geology
  • Geophysics
  • Industrial Archaeology
  • Materials Science and Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Physics


New Graduate Fellowships Lure Returning Peace Corps Volunteers

A new partnership between Michigan Tech and the US Peace Corps will enable returning Peace Corps volunteers to attend graduate school at Michigan Tech while putting their Peace Corps skills to work. Michigan Tech is one of the universities recently selected by the Peace Corps to offer new or expanded Paul D. Coverdell Fellows Program graduate degrees, which include scholarships and degree-related internships in underserved American communities.

The new fellowships will support graduate degrees in biological sciences, forestry, applied ecology, forest ecology and management, forest molecular genetics and biotechnology, environmental policy and industrial archaeology. All returned Peace Corps volunteers will be eligible to apply for the Coverdell program. Currently, 12 alumni who received bachelor’s degrees at Michigan Tech are serving in the Peace Corps. They also will be eligible for the new program when they finish their service.

“Michigan Tech is extremely pleased to be selected to participate in the Coverdell Fellows Program,” said Graduate School Dean Jacqueline Huntoon. “With this program, we will continue to strengthen our collaboration with the Peace Corps, building on our existing programs for returned Peace Corps volunteers and students in our Peace Corps Master’s International programs.

Read more..

Published in Tech Today by Jenn Donovan, public relations director


US Department of Energy Computational Sciences Graduate Fellowships

U.S. Department of Energy Computational Sciences Graduate Fellowships

The U.S. Department of Energy provides funding for students in their first or second year of graduate study in the fields of physical, engineering, computers, mathematics and life sciences. The fellowships are renewable up to four years. Students receive about $31,000 a year, as well as a $1,000 annual academic allowance for travel, research activities and attending conferences. Some students may also get matched funds for computer support up to $2,475.


New theses and dissertations available in the Library

The Graduate School is pleased to announce new theses and dissertations are now available in the J.R. van Pelt and Opie Library from the following programs:

  • Civil Engineering
  • Computer Science
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Engineering Science
  • Industrial Archaeology
  • Materials Science and Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics
  • Rhetoric and Technical Communication


New theses and dissertations available in the Library

The Graduate School is pleased to announce new theses and dissertations are now available in the J.R. van Pelt and Opie Library from the following programs:

  • Chemical Engineering
  • Chemistry
  • Civil Engineering
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Forest Ecology and Management
  • Geological Engineering
  • Geology
  • Geophysics
  • Industrial Archaeology
  • Mathematical Sciences
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics


Industrial Archaeology Program Cosponsors Events

The Industrial Archaeology Program, of the Department of Social Sciences, is cosponsoring events that are part of the Isle Royale and Keweenaw Parks Association’s annual meeting this weekend, July 23 and 24.

Associate Professors Tim Scarlett and Susan Martin (both of SS), with Red Jacket Trolley’s Wil Shapton, will be leading a guided trolley tour centering on copper mining in Isle Royale and in the Keweenaw. The trip will run from 1 to 4 p.m., Sunday, July 24, starting at Calumet and then moving on to the Cliff Mine. The cost is $10; space is limited and advance registration is required.

Other events include a stereoscopic tour of Lake Superior, Isle Royale, and the Keweenaw in the 1860s and early 1900s, and a book signing. For more information on these events, visit parks.

For more information call 482-3627 or email irkpa@irkpa.org.

Published in Tech Today.