Tag: Physics

The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences Postdoctorate Fellowship

The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences is seeking postdoctoral fellows with Ph.D., D.V.M., or M.D. degrees to participate in research. Hamner research programs focus on creating mechanistic information to reduce uncertainty in estimating human health risks from chemical exposures. Candidates in the life, physical, and engineering sciences are encouraged to apply. Hamner doctoral staff members have backgrounds in aerosol science, molecular and cellular biology, veterinary medicine, pharmacology and toxicology, pathology, biochemistry, chemistry, biomathematics, biostatistics, and engineering. The Hamner offers exciting opportunities to use contemporary research approaches and instrumentation to address real-world issues. Over the past 25 years, more than 400 postdoctoral fellows have been trained at The Hamner and are now employed in responsible positions in industrial, government, and academic organizations.


Beckman Institute Posdoctorate Fellowships

The Beckman Institute Fellows program is intended for recent Ph.D.s or students in their final year of doctoral study with research interests relevant to the Beckman Institute. A competition is held yearly and four fellows are selected for terms of up to three years.

Initiated in the fall of 1991 with funding from the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation, the program provides an opportunity for young scientists to spend several years doing independent research in the behavioral and biological sciences, chemistry, engineering, and physics before launching formal academic careers. Fellows are selected on the basis of their professional promise, capacity for independent work, interdisciplinary interests, and outstanding achievement to date. Preference is given to those applicants whose research interests correspond to one or more of the programs in the Beckman Institute.


Michigan Space Grants Available

Michigan Space Grants Available
The Michigan Space Grant Consortium (MSGC) is inviting applications for 2010-11. The application and review processes are online at www.umich.edu/~msgc .

Funding is available for the following:

* Fellowship Program
* Research Seed Grant Program
* Precollege Education Program
* Public Outreach Program
* Teacher Training Program

Michigan Tech’s MSGC liaison is Chris Anderson, special assistant to the president for Institutional Diversity. For more information, contact Anderson at csanders@mtu.edu or Michigan Tech’s MSGC Assistant, Carol Argentati, at 487-2474 or caargent@mtu.edu .

Applications are due to Institutional Diversity no later than 3:30 p.m., Monday, Nov. 16.

The process for submission is as follows:

1) Create a budget be contacting Kellie Buss at Research and Sponsored Programs at 487-2226 or by email at kellie@mtu.edu .

2) Complete online forms at www.umich.edu/~msgc (but do not submit until after step 4).

3) Complete transmittal form by clicking here .

4) Print the materials and bring them to Institutional Diversity, which will provide a letter of approval to submit. Step 4 needs to be completed during the week of Nov. 16.


New theses and dissertations in the Library

The Graduate School is pleased to announce the arrival of new theses and dissertations from our recent graduates in the J. R. Van Pelt Library and John and Ruanne Opie Library.  The names of our graduates, their degrees, advisors, and titles of their research are listed below.

Ganesh Kumar Arumugam
Doctor of Philosophy in Chemistry
Advisor: Patricia A Heiden
Dissertation Title: Controlled Nanostructures for Optoelectronic and Other Advanced Applications

Xin Bai
Doctor of Philosophy in Chemistry
Advisor: Richard E Brown
Dissertation Title: Ab Initio Studies for Solvated Electrons in Hydrogen Fluoride, Water and Ammonia, The Dipole-Electron Interaction and Hydrogen Bonding

Emily C Fossum
Doctor of Philosophy in Mechanical Engineering – Engineering Mechanics
Advisor: Lyon B King
Dissertation Title: Electron Mobility in ExB Devices

Jennifer M Heglund
Master of Science in Environmental Engineering
Advisor: Brian D Barkdoll
Thesis Title: Effects of Climate Change Induced Heavy Precipitation Events on Sediment Transport in Lower Michigan Rivers

Laura E Hernandez
Master of Science in Civil Engineering
Advisor: Stanley J Vitton
Thesis Title: Integrating the American Society of Civil Engineer’s Body of Knowledge into Soil Mechanics Laboratory Curriculum

Xiukui Li
Doctor of Philosophy in Electrical Engineering
Advisor: Seyed A Zekavat
Dissertation Title: Cognitive Radio Based Dynamic Spectrum Sharing

Joseph Miller
Doctor of Philosophy in Civil Engineering
Advisor: William M Bulleit
Dissertation Title: Design and Analysis of Mechanically Laminated Timber Beams Using Shear Keys

Sowmya S Moily
Master of Science in Electrical Engineering
Co-advisors: Jindong Tan and Byung K Choi
Thesis Title: PayOne: Incentive for Epidemic Protocol-based Anonymity System

Puspamitra Panigrahi
Doctor of Philosophy in Physics
Advisor: Ranjit Pati
Dissertation Title: Controlling Electronic and Magnetic Properties of Ultra Narrow Multilayered Nanowires

Raja S Payyavula
Doctor of Philosophy in Forest Molecular Genetics and Biotechnology
Co-advisors: Chung-Jui Tsai and Scott A Harding
Dissertation Title: An Investigation of Phenolic Glycoside and Condensed Tannin Homeostasis in Populus by Salicyl Alcohol Feeding to Cell Cultures and by Transgenic Manipulation of the Sucrose Transporter, PTSUT4, IN PLANTA

Tongquan Wei
Doctor of Philosophy in Electrical Engineering
Advisor: Piyush Mishra
Dissertation Title: Energy-Efficient Fault-Tolerance Schemes for Multi-Core Hard Real-Time Systems


DOE Office of Science Graduate Fellowships

The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC) has established the DOE Office of Science Graduate Fellowship ( DOE SCGF) program to support outstanding students to pursue graduate training in basic research in areas of physics, biology, chemistry, mathematics, engineering, computational sciences, and environmental sciences relevant to the Office of Science and to encourage the development of the next generation scientific and technical talent in the U.S.

The Fellowship award provides partial tuition support, an annual stipend for living expenses, and a research stipend for full-time graduate study and thesis/dissertation research at a U.S. academic institution for three years.

Application deadline is November 30th

Please email jglehman@mtu.edu if you are interested in applying.


Fellowships in the Energy Field, Simulation and Training, and Ocean Engineering

The Link Foundation has posted three competitive fellowships for students working toward a Ph.D. degree:

Energy

Simulation and Training

Ocean Engineering

No limitations have been placed on citizenship.

If you would like to apply, please make an appointment with Jodi Lehman (jglehman@mtu.edu).   University endorsement required for proposal submission.


National Physical Science Consortium

NPSC Graduate Fellowships in Physical Science

Michigan Tech female and minority graduate students are qualified, as Michigan Tech is a participating NPSC Member University, for the NPSC fellowship.

NPSC welcomes applications from any qualified U.S. citizen who has the ability to pursue graduate work at an NPSC member institution. NPSC attempts to recruit a broad pool of applicants with special emphasis on underrepresented minorities and women. Applicants should be in one of the following categories:

For the Traditional Program:

  • Be in your senior year with at least a 3.0/4.0 GPA
  • Be in your first year of a graduate program.
  • Be in a terminal master’s program (your university offers no Ph.D. in your discipline).
  • Be returning from the workforce with no more than a master’s degree

For the Dissertation Support Program, be near the point at which your research will begin.

Fields of Study:

Though the fields supported can vary annually depending on employer needs, in general NPSC covers the following: Astronomy, Chemistry, Computer Science, Geology, Materials Science, Mathematical Sciences, Physics, and their subdisciplines, and related engineering fields: Chemical, Computer, Electrical, Environmental, Mechanical.

For more information please visit COS.

If interested in applying, please contact Jodi Lehman (jglehman@mtu.edu)


Pandey Group Models Molecular Transistor

Published in Tech Today

by Marcia Goodrich, senior writer

Electronic gadgetry gets tinier and more powerful all the time, but at some point, the transistors and myriad other component parts will get so little they won’t work. That’s because when things get really small, the regular rules of Newtonian physics quit and the weird rules of quantum mechanics kick in. When that happens, as physics professor and chair Ravindra Pandey puts it, “everything goes haywire.”

Theorists in the field of molecular electronics hope to get around the problem by designing components out of a single molecule. Pandey’s group has done just that–theoretically–by modeling a single-molecule field-effect transistor on a computer.

“Transistor” has been an oft-used but rarely understood household word since cheap Japanese radios flooded the US market back in the 1960s. Field-effect transistors form the basis of all integrated circuits, which in turn are the foundation of all modern electronics.

A simple switch either diverts current or shuts it off. Transistors can also amplify the current by applying voltage to it (that’s how amplifiers work).

A diagram of Pandey’s three-terminal single-molecule transistor looks like an elaborate necklace and pendant, made up of six-sided rings of carbon atoms bedecked with hydrogen and nitrogen atoms. His group demonstrated that the electrical current running from the source to the drain (through the necklace) rises dramatically when voltage applied at the gate (through the pendant) reaches a certain level.

This happens when electrons in the current suddenly move from one orbital path around their atoms to another. Or, as Pandey says, “Molecular orbital energies appear to contribute to the enhancement of the source-drain current.”

Their virtual molecule may soon exist outside a computer. “Several experimental groups are working to make real our theoretical results,” says Pandey.

An article on the molecular transistor, “Electronic Conduction in a Model Three-Terminal Molecular Transistor,” was published in 2008 in the journal Nanotechnology, volume 19. Coauthors are physics graduate student Haiying He and Sashi Karna of the Army Research Lab.


Ulrich Hansmann Wins 2009 Michigan Tech Research Award

Tech Today

by Jennifer Donovan, public relations director

Ulrich Hansmann, professor of physics and leader in computational and biophysics research, has received the 2009 Michigan Tech Research Award.

He developed seminal numerical techniques for modeling the workings of living cells and led efforts to apply computational algorithms to protein physics. He recently was named a Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS), a recognition of excellence by his peers and one of the highest honors in his field.

Hansmann is a pioneer in computational modeling of protein folding, a molecular process that, when it goes awry, can give rise to neurological diseases such as Alzheimer’s. His work could help uncover the underlying processes causing proteins to misfold, potentially leading to effective therapies.

“Uli’s achievements in the protein-folding problem–one of the most significant challenges in science today–have been astonishing,” Robert H. Swendsen, professor of physics at Carnegie Mellon University, remarked.

“Uli is one of Tech’s leading computational scientists, with his outstanding work and international reputation among leaders in his field,” said David Reed, vice president for research. “He has taken the lead in trying to build computational capacity at Tech, and we look forward to continued advancement in this area through the current Strategic Faculty Hiring Initiative in computational discovery and innovation.”

Ravindra Pandey, chair of the physics department, also had high praise for Hansmann. “We are extremely proud of Professor Hansmann’s achievements in computational biophysics,” Pandey said. “He is an internationally known scientist in protein folding. He has established a well funded research group here at Michigan Tech and conducts extremely productive collaborative work with several national and international research groups.”

A leader in a computational approach to understanding the complex interactions in biological systems in a new, interdisciplinary field known as systems biology, Hansmann organized three international workshops on computational biophysics in systems biology. While continuing to teach and do research at Michigan Tech, he also helped the John von Neumann Institute for Computing in Jülich, Germany, develop a computational biology and biophysics research group.

“Not all key processes or molecules are accessible by experiments; simulations are sometimes the only technique to detect hidden processes or proteins,” Hansmann explained. “A systems biology approach that aims at deciphering the life functions in a cell requires a close interplay between experiments and computing.”

The physicist’s research goals include analysis and interpretation of biological data through modeling of molecular networks and simulation of cellular biophysics. He hopes this will enable scientists to analyze and predict complex diseases at a molecular level.

Although Hansmann is doing cutting-edge work, he is in no way proprietary about it. He already has developed a software program called Simple Molecular Mechanics for Proteins (SMMP) that is freely available as open source software on the Internet. One of his ongoing research goals is to develop public software for molecular simulation of cells.

As a teacher, Hansmann is devoted to helping students from a variety of fields, including physics, computer science, chemistry and biology, learn how to use supercomputers in their research. He also mentors community college students from underrepresented and disadvantaged populations through the Michigan Colleges and Universities Partnership (MICUP) program at Michigan Tech.

Born in Germany, Hansmann received his PhD in Physics from Freie Universität in Berlin. He has taught physics at Michigan Tech since 1998. His research is supported by the National Science Foundation.