Tag Archives: Course Recommendations

Why am I getting a “Major Restriction” error when I try to enroll in University Chemistry II lab/recitation?

In the spring semester there is one section of CH 1161 University Chemistry Lab II and one section of CH 1163 University Chemistry Recitation II that is reserved for only chemistry majors, which is not us.  This section is indicated under “course comments” when you click on the CRN for any of the lab or recitation sections.

You will need to choose a different section of CH 1161 and/or CH 1163.

Note that CH 1163 U Chem II recitation is recommended because of positive feedback we’ve received from students who have taken it.  They tell us that it is even more helpful than U Chem I recitation because U Chem II is more new material and less review of high school chemistry topics than U Chem I.  If you choose to take U Chem II recitation then it can count towards your free elective requirement.


How can I prepare for registration?

Registration is always right around the corner, and before it arrives, it’s best to get prepared. Those of you who have tried to make an appointment with Katie near registration time know that her schedule fills up. She has “walk-in” office hours weeks 9-11, so you will not need an appointment, but you may face some lines. With this post I reach out to you with some advice to ensure that you have a good registration season.

Katie’s walk-in office hours schedule is posted here: blogs.mtu.edu/chem-eng-undergrad/

If you are uncertain what classes you need to take, please take a look at our video on Planning your Schedule.

Planning your schedule begins with the planning handout at this link (http://www.chem.mtu.edu/~fmorriso/advising/2015MoreAdvisingInfoHandout4SemPlanFAM.pdf), which shows a 4-year plan of how the Chemical Engineering curriculum maps out. I have indicated the classes that cause a bottleneck–these are the classes that are only offered one time per year. Up until the spring of junior year you have flexibility in when you can take classes. The three spring junior classes, however, (transport 2, kinetics, controls) are only offered in the spring. The senior chemical engineering classes (unit and plant operations, plant design, safety and the environment) are only offered once per year as well. This means that you need to be ready for those spring junior classes during the spring that you plan to take them.

The pre-requisites for our classes are summarized on this handout:  www.mtu.edu/chemical/undergraduate/advising/pdfs/prerequisite-map.pdf

To plan out your schedule you should map out which semester you intend to take the fixed classes (spring junior classes, senior classes) and then back-calculate when you will take the pre-requisites for those courses.

On the planning handout I have also indicated when classes are offered on-line, and I’ve highlighted some General Education (GenEd) rules that you should be mindful of as you plan out your GenEd choices.

Finally, once things get close to graduation, every requirement must be met and this can get confusing sometimes. For checking or auditing your compliance with your degree requirements Michigan Tech uses DARS: Degree Audit Reporting System. Go to your Banweb account, log in, and look for Degree audit. You can run your own degree audit. It takes a minute or two for the computer to slot all your courses into the various bins or “buckets” where they satisfy requirements. When it’s finished, you can take a look. Green is good; red is bad. You will see all kinds of lists and requirements that are checked. It is a computer program and online, so hopefully you can poke around a bit and figure out how it’s working. If you are a transfer student or if you transferred in courses, it is very helpful for sorting out what credits count for what.

Please take a look at your DARS and see how your credits earned are stacking up towards getting your CM degree. If you look over the attached sheet, consult the pre-req map, look at your degree audit, and make use of the handouts for minors and technical electives that are on the Advising web page, you will see that registration is a snap.

Thanks for your patience during registration season. We will endeavor to answer all your questions and hopefully we can find a solution that will lead to a smooth path towards your BS in chemical engineering.

More helpful links:

best wishes,

Dr. Morrison


Is there a standard course plan for a transfer student?

It is possible to transfer to Michigan Tech Chemical Engineering from a community college or from another university.  A standard path for this would be to take two years of college work at that other institution followed by a summer at Michigan Tech and then the usual junior and senior years of chemical engineering at Michigan Tech.  The two summer classes that must be taken are:

  • CM2110 Fundamentals of Chemical Engineering I
  • CM2120 Fundamentals of Chemical Engieering II

These two classes are prerequisites to junior classes in chemical engineering and they must be completed before you may begin your junior year in chemical engineering.  It is not possible to take these two classes at the same time as junior classes.  For this reason, students who wish to graduate with two years of transfer credit must plan on either three years at Michigan Tech or they must take these two courses the summer before they start Michigan Tech junior classes in chemical engineering.

The standard transfer plan, as discussed above, is available on our handouts page.


How can I prepare for graduate school in chemical engineering?

The first year of graduate school in chemical engineering typically involves taking advanced courses in transport, thermodynamics, kinetics, and mathematics (partial differential equations).  It may also involve specialty courses specific to your area of chosen specialization. Anything that makes those required courses easier is a good idea.  I feel that at Michigan Tech we do not go far enough in transport, so I recommend that you take the graduate transport class (CM5300 Advanced Transport Phenomena I, 3 credits, Spring, prereq=CM5100) or Polymer Rheology (CM4650, 3 credits), either of which will introduce you to the use of tensors in mathematical analysis.  After that I recommend taking our graduate math class (CM5100 Applied Mathematics for Chemical Engineers I, 3 credits, Fall) or any advanced mathematics course that interests you (some examples might be MA Continue reading