Category: Academic Advising

How do I get to my online degree audit?

Go to Banweb to get to your online degree audit. Be sure to run the default audit titled “Latest” because this will run the audit with your correct catalog year. Degree Services has more detailed information on how to run the audit on their webpage. New students will be able to run audits 30 days before the semester starts.

Run your online degree audit every time you change your schedule to check your progress towards graduation.  Unfortunately, the online audit is not perfect. This is why it’s important for you to know where your classes should be counting and which requirements should be complete.  If you have questions then contact your academic advisor to investigate.  


How do I figure out what classes to take next semester?

Plan your future semesters based on your interests.  Things to consider:  co-ops, undergraduate research, Enterprise program, minors, study abroad, graduate school.  The more credit you came in with the more flexibility you’ll have and the sooner you can start doing some of these things.  Remember that your plan is a draft and subject to change as you explore your interests. 

The general process for planning out future semesters is as follows: 

  1. Find your degree requirements on the department’s advising webpage or Registrar’s Office webpage.  This is based on your catalog year, which is usually the year that you started at Michigan Tech.  Print out either the flowchart, 4- or 5-year sample schedule, or degree audit to use as a checklist.  
  2. Cross off completed or in-progress requirements.  Write elective courses next to the corresponding requirement to keep track of them.
  3. Run your online degree audit on Banweb to make sure classes are counting where they are expected to.  If they are not then contact your academic advisor to find out why.  Online degree audits for new students will be available 30 days before the semester starts.
  4. Print out a blank academic plan sheet from the department’s advising webpage or set up a spreadsheet and start writing down the classes you plan to take for each future semester.  It usually makes the most sense to start with the major required classes, then minor classes if you are doing a minor, and finally remaining elective classes.

Be aware that the last step takes work. We’ve put a lot of information on the department’s FAQs to help you find your way through the process.  Once you have a rough plan, review it with your academic advisor to make sure you’ve got all the details right. 


What is my catalog year?

In most cases your catalog year is the year in which you started at Michigan Tech.  You may be on a newer catalog year for any of the following reasons:

  • changed majors,
  • left the university for two semesters or longer,
  • or requested to move to a newer catalog year.

You can find your catalog year in the upper right-hand corner of your online degree audit on Banweb.  It is labeled catalog term and is a six digit number. The first four digits are the year and the last two digits represent the semester.

  • Fall semester = 08 (semester starts in August)
  • Spring semester = 01 (semester starts in January)
  • Summer semester = 05 (semester starts in May)

For example, if your catalog term is 202108 then you are following the 2021-22 degree requirements. The academic year starts in the fall and runs through summer.

If you are pursuing a minor, the catalog year for the minor may be different than the catalog year for your major.


If I am on probation, how does taking summer classes affect my academic standing?

If you are taking summer classes at Michigan Tech then it is treated just like any other semester, regardless of whether or not you are taking a full load of classes. Doing well in your summer classes can bring you off of academic probation. Doing poorly in your summer classes can put you on academic probation or count towards an additional semester of probation if you are already on probation. Go to the Dean of Students webpage for more information on the academic probation policy.

If you are taking summer classes at a different school then it will not affect your academic standing at Michigan Tech.


Where can I find my final grade for a course?

Grades that you see in Canvas are not final grades. Final grades, which are used to calculate your GPA, are posted on Banweb.

It’s really important that you check your final grades at the end of every semester because final grades are not always the same as what you see in Canvas.  Many times your final grade in Banweb will match what you see in Canvas, but not always. Some instructors will adjust the grading scale down (or up!), sometimes a mistake is made, and in certain situations the instructor may give you a temporary grade (P, I, or X grade), which means you have limited time to complete something before receiving a final grade. All of this is important to know so that you can follow up promptly with your instructor if you have questions.

You can see your final grades by logging into Banweb.  Go to the Students tab, then Student Records, and then Final Grades or Academic Transcript (unofficial).  Either place will give you access to your final recorded course grades that are used to calculate your GPA. If you see something that you don’t understand then check out the definition of the grade codes in the Undergraduate Catalog under Grade Policies.


I want to change my major to Chem Eng; what are the requirements for this?

We require a meeting with the ChE advisor prior to approving any change major requests.  If you’d like to change majors or are considering changing majors into ChE then make an appointment with the ChE academic advisor.  After your meeting you may submit your request to change majors through the Curriculum Change Portlet that is on your MyMichiganTech webpage.  There are directions on how to do this on the Registrar’s Office change major page.

Our general policy for major changes is as follows:  Students admitted to the College of Engineering may switch their major to chemical engineering.  Students admitted into a different College may also switch their major to chemical engineering provided they have earned a grade of C or better in key math and science classes (calculus, university chemistry, and university physics).  Students who do not meet these requirements will need to develop a course plan with the ChE academic advisor, which may include retaking key classes prior to switching majors.


What are Katie’s office hours?

If you are looking for the flowchart or other advising handouts, these are available on the Degree Requirements and Advising Documents webpages.

If you are having problems registering for courses that are not chemical engineering courses, contact the Registrar’s Office.

Also check out our FAQ’s for answers to many common questions.

Fall and Spring Semesters

During fall and spring semesters I am usually available for meetings during walk-in advising times or by appointment. Currently all meetings are being held over Zoom.

Walk-in advising is open during busy times, which are at the beginning of the semester and registration weeks.  During walk-in advising you just stop by.  You do not need an appointment.    Walk-in times, along with the Zoom links are posted on my Google calendar.

During all other times of the semester you may meet with me by requesting a meeting using your Google calendar.

Summer Semester

During summer semester priority is being given to emergency issues in need of immediate attention because of limited work hours.  If you have an issue during the summer, email cmadvise@mtu.edu;  your patience is appreciated!  Regular advising hours resume two weeks before fall semester starts.


I’m starting out in precalculus (MA 1032 or MA 1120). Can I still graduate in four years?

If you are willing to take summer classes, then yes. You’ll need to take summer classes after your first year and maybe after your second year too to make this work. You can take summer classes at Michigan Tech or at a community college and then transfer in the classes.

If summer classes are not feasible or you can only take a limited number then you can instead adjust your classes so that you can co-op during the five years. Having engineering work experience through a co-op prior to graduation will help you with landing summer internships and your first full-time job because most employers look for this type of experience when hiring.

If you’d like help getting your options sorted out then set up a meeting with your advisor during a less busy time (week 3-7 of the semester).


What do you think of double majoring?

There was an opinion piece in the New York Times in October 2018 that expresses one view of double majoring.

Opinion Today

David Leonhardt
Op-Ed Columnist for the New York Times

24 October 2018

(an excerpt)

When I visit a college campus and ask the students what they’re studying, the response often starts with: “I’m double-majoring in … ” And then my heart sinks just a little bit.

I understand why many students are temped to double-major. They have more than one academic interest. When I was in college, I briefly thought about double-majoring in my two favorite subjects, math and history. (Instead, I spent much of my time at the college newspaper and barely completed one major — applied math.)

But the reality is that many students who double-major aren’t doing it out of intellectual curiosity. The number of double majors has soared in recent years mostly because students see it as a way to add one more credential to their résumé. What’s even better than one major? Two majors!

Except that it’s not. Most students would learn more by creatively mastering a single major — and leaving themselves time to take classes in multiple other fields. “Double majoring,” as Jacqueline Sanchez, a Wellesley College student, wrote in a recent op-ed for her campus paper, “ultimately prevents students from exploring many different disciplines.”

Unfortunately, double majoring is just one part of a credentials arms race among teenagers and college students. This arms race exacerbates inequality, because it can make upper-middle-class students seem more accomplished than working-class and poor students. And the arms race is also unpleasant and counterproductive for many of the well-off students. They’re loading up on extracurricular activities, Advanced Placement courses and college majors, rather than exploring, going deep into one or two areas and learning what they really enjoy.  (see link for more)


How can I give the University feedback or register a complaint?

Michigan Tech has a web form for giving feedback or registering a complaint.  From the website:

The Dean of Students Office at Michigan Tech is committed to fostering a supportive environment where students are listened to, understood, and appreciated. When students have a complaint or concern about their campus experience, whether it is in or out of the classroom, the Dean of Students Office provides help and guidance in resolving the issue.

For more information, go to the Student Concerns and Complaints website.  Working together, we can continuously improve Michigan Tech and the Michigan Tech experience.