What are Katie’s office hours?

If you are looking for the flowchart or other advising handouts, these are available on the Degree Requirements and Advising Documents webpages.

If you are having problems registering for courses that are not chemical engineering courses, contact the Registrar’s Office.

Also check out our FAQ’s for answers to many common questions.

Fall and Spring Semesters

During fall and spring semesters I am usually available for meetings during walk-in advising times or by appointment. Currently all meetings are being held over Zoom.

Walk-in advising is open during busy times, which are at the beginning of the semester and registration weeks.  During walk-in advising you just stop by.  You do not need an appointment.    Walk-in times, along with the Zoom links are posted on my Google calendar.

During all other times of the semester you may meet with me by requesting a meeting using your Google calendar.

Summer Semester

During summer semester priority is being given to emergency issues in need of immediate attention because of limited work hours.  If you have an issue during the summer, email cmadvise@mtu.edu;  your patience is appreciated!  Regular advising hours resume two weeks before fall semester starts.

How do I get to my online degree audit?

Go to Banweb to get to your online degree audit. Be sure to run the default audit titled “Latest” because this will run the audit with your correct catalog year. Degree Services has more detailed information on how to run the audit on their webpage. New students will be able to run audits 30 days before the semester starts.

Run your online degree audit every time you change your schedule to check your progress towards graduation.  Unfortunately, the online audit is not perfect. This is why it’s important for you to know where your classes should be counting and which requirements should be complete.  If you have questions then contact your academic advisor to investigate.  


How do I figure out what classes to take next semester?

Plan your future semesters based on your interests.  Things to consider:  co-ops, undergraduate research, Enterprise program, minors, study abroad, graduate school.  The more credit you came in with the more flexibility you’ll have and the sooner you can start doing some of these things.  Remember that your plan is a draft and subject to change as you explore your interests. 

The general process for planning out future semesters is as follows: 

  1. Find your degree requirements on the department’s advising webpage or Registrar’s Office webpage.  This is based on your catalog year, which is usually the year that you started at Michigan Tech.  Print out either the flowchart, 4- or 5-year sample schedule, or degree audit to use as a checklist.  
  2. Cross off completed or in-progress requirements.  Write elective courses next to the corresponding requirement to keep track of them.
  3. Run your online degree audit on Banweb to make sure classes are counting where they are expected to.  If they are not then contact your academic advisor to find out why.  Online degree audits for new students will be available 30 days before the semester starts.
  4. Print out a blank academic plan sheet from the department’s advising webpage or set up a spreadsheet and start writing down the classes you plan to take for each future semester.  It usually makes the most sense to start with the major required classes, then minor classes if you are doing a minor, and finally remaining elective classes.

Be aware that the last step takes work. We’ve put a lot of information on the department’s FAQs to help you find your way through the process.  Once you have a rough plan, review it with your academic advisor to make sure you’ve got all the details right. 


What is my catalog year?

In most cases your catalog year is the year in which you started at Michigan Tech.  You may be on a newer catalog year for any of the following reasons:

  • changed majors,
  • left the university for two semesters or longer,
  • or requested to move to a newer catalog year.

You can find your catalog year in the upper right-hand corner of your online degree audit on Banweb.  It is labeled catalog term and is a six digit number. The first four digits are the year and the last two digits represent the semester.

  • Fall semester = 08 (semester starts in August)
  • Spring semester = 01 (semester starts in January)
  • Summer semester = 05 (semester starts in May)

For example, if your catalog term is 202108 then you are following the 2021-22 degree requirements. The academic year starts in the fall and runs through summer.

If you are pursuing a minor, the catalog year for the minor may be different than the catalog year for your major.


What changed on the new 2021-22 ChE flowchart?

If you are comparing the 2021-22 flowchart with an older version, then here’s what look for:

CM 2110 Material and Energy Balances. The title was change from Fundamentals of ChE I to Material and Energy Balances. The class itself hasn’t changed.

CM 3230 Thermodynamics for ChE. This course was moved from spring of third year to spring of second year and CH 3510 pchem lecture is no longer a prerequisite.

CM 3240 Separations. This is a new course that is replacing the old CM 2120 Fundamentals of ChE II course. CM 3240 is considered an equivalent to CM 2120, and so if you’ve already taken CM 2120 then you do not need to take this new course. The new CM 3240 course requires CM 3230 thermo as a prereq.

CM 3980 Sustainable ChE and CM 4320 Process Safety. These are new courses that are replacing CM 4310 Chemical Process Safety/Environment. You may take the new CM 3980 sustainability course anytime after completing CM 2110 and differential equations and we will be offering it both fall and spring semesters even though the flowchart only has it listed for fall semesters.

Technical Electives. The technical elective rules were simplified. The CH 2420 Organic Chemistry II or CM 4740 Hydro/Pyro or BL 2100 Principles of Biochemistry option was changed to a technical elective. CH 3511 Pchem Lab was changed to a technical elective. The core engineering elective was changed to a technical elective. On the new curriculum you need 18 credits of technical electives. The flowchart shows this as CM 1000 Intro to ChE plus an additional 17 credits of technical electives.


If I am on probation, how does taking summer classes affect my academic standing?

If you are taking summer classes at Michigan Tech then it is treated just like any other semester, regardless of whether or not you are taking a full load of classes. Doing well in your summer classes can bring you off of academic probation. Doing poorly in your summer classes can put you on academic probation or count towards an additional semester of probation if you are already on probation. Go to the Dean of Students webpage for more information on the academic probation policy.

If you are taking summer classes at a different school then it will not affect your academic standing at Michigan Tech.


If I get a CD or D in my math class, do I have to retake it?

We recommend retaking any math classes in which you’ve earned less than a C because these are important for your junior and senior engineering classes. However, you are not required to take it again because it meets our minimum prerequisite requirement.  

Be aware that you will start utilizing what you’ve learned in your math, chemistry, and physics classes in your ChE classes and applying it to solve various engineering problems.  In particular, the application of math to solve engineering problems intensifies in the junior year classes. Students usually struggle with this, even if they have previously done well in their math classes because it’s using math in an entirely different context.  It looks different, the terminology is sometimes different, and you’re being asked to recall concepts that you learned a year (or longer!) ago.  

In general it is probably worth your time to brush up on calculus, linear algebra, and differential equations prior to starting the junior year ChE classes.  Retaking classes you did poorly in, reviewing course topics and note from your math classes (even ones you did well in), and/or utilizing online resources, like Khan Academy, are all a good idea.

See also: What happens if I retake a class? and How can I succeed in ChE at Michigan Tech?


What do I need to know to plan out a minor in Alternative Energy Technology?

If you are interested in adding the minor in Alternative Energy Technology to your record then you’ll need to email your list of planned classes for the minor, along with the semester in which you plan to take the courses, to the chemical engineering advisor. We require this to ensure that you’ll be able to complete the minor in the time frame that you need. Then you will need to request the addition of the minor from your MyMichiganTech webpage. Directions for how to do this are on the minor page of the Registrar’s Office, Degree Services webpage.


Where can I find my final grade for a course?

Grades that you see in Canvas are not final grades. Final grades, which are used to calculate your GPA, are posted on Banweb.

It’s really important that you check your final grades at the end of every semester because final grades are not always the same as what you see in Canvas.  Many times your final grade in Banweb will match what you see in Canvas, but not always. Some instructors will adjust the grading scale down (or up!), sometimes a mistake is made, and in certain situations the instructor may give you a temporary grade (P, I, or X grade), which means you have limited time to complete something before receiving a final grade. All of this is important to know so that you can follow up promptly with your instructor if you have questions.

You can see your final grades by logging into Banweb.  Go to the Students tab, then Student Records, and then Final Grades or Academic Transcript (unofficial).  Either place will give you access to your final recorded course grades that are used to calculate your GPA. If you see something that you don’t understand then check out the definition of the grade codes in the Undergraduate Catalog under Grade Policies.


What do I need to know to plan out a polymer science and engineering minor?

If you are interested in adding the polymer science and engineering minor to your record then you’ll need to email your list of planned classes for the minor, along with the semester in which you plan to take the courses, to the chemical engineering advisor. We require this to ensure that you’ll be able to complete the minor in the time frame that you need. Then you will need to request the addition of the minor from your MyMichiganTech webpage. Directions for how to do this are on the minor page of the Registrar’s Office, Degree Services webpage.

When planning your minor courses, make sure you have a listing of the most current requirements for the minor. You can get this on the Registrar’s Office, Degree Services webpage. The listing of requirements that you are looking for is called the “minor audit”.

You will need to plan ahead because many of the minor classes have prerequisites that you need to complete first. The prerequisites can be found in the course descriptions or on the minor audit. Course descriptions are in Michigan Tech’s Undergraduate Catalog

Finally, once you’ve figured out the classes that you’ll be taking to complete the minor, you should meet with your major advisor to determine if any (or all!) of the classes for your minor can also be counted towards your major requirements. 

Here is some additional information that may help you with planning this minor. The typical schedule for when classes are offered is listed below, but this can change from year-to-year. The schedule of classes for the following academic year is published in February and so you’ll want to check it once it’s available.

For the introduction to polymers course:

  • BE 4300 Polymeric Biomaterials is usually offered every other spring during odd years, such as Spring ’23, Spring ’25, etc.
  • CM/CH 4610 Introduction to Polymer Science is usually offered every fall.
  • MSE 4110 Introduction to Polymer Engineering is usually offered every fall.

For the chemistry or engineering courses check with the department offering the course for the expected planned schedule.

For the elective courses:

  • BE 3300 Biomechanics I or MEEM 2150 Mechanics of Materials are usually offered every year.
  • BE 4335 Smart Polymers is usually offered every other fall during odd years, such as Fall ’21, Fall ’23, etc.
  • CH/CM 4620 Polymer Chemistry is usually offered every spring.
  • CH 4710 Biomolecular Chemistry is usually offered every fall but has a time conflict with CM 4855, which is required for senior chemical engineering students.
  • CM 4060 Undergraduate Research in Polymer Engineering is offered on demand. If you are interested in doing undergraduate research in the chemical engineering department then you will need to talk to the faculty who are doing research in the polymer engineering area to see if they have a project that you can work on with them. The faculty currently doing research in this area are Dr. Liu and Dr. Ong.
  • CM 4650 Polymer Rheology is usually offered every other spring during even years, such as Spring ’22, Spring ’24, etc.
  • ENG 4510 Sustainable Futures I is usually offered every fall. In order to use this class towards the minor you will need to complete a polymer-related term project. Email your topic to the chemical engineering advisor for approval.
  • ENT XXXX Enterprise Project Work. If you are doing work in Enterprise that is in the polymer science or engineering area then up to three credits of Enterprise may be approved to use towards the minor. Email a brief description of your project for each of the semesters that you wish to be considered for approval to the chemical engineering advisor.
  • MEEM 4170 Failure of Materials in Mechanics is usually offered every spring.
  • MEEM 4635 Design with Plastics has not been offered recently. You will need to check with the Mechanical Engineering Department to see when it will be available next.
  • MSE 4430 Composite Materials is usually offered every spring.
  • XX xxxx Undergraduate Research in the polymer science and engineering area from other departments may be approved for the minor. Email a brief description of your research to the chemical engineering advisor for approval. Several students have done polymer chemistry research with Dr. Heiden in the Chemistry Department, as one example.


What do I need to know to plan out a mineral processing minor?

If you are interested in adding the mineral processing minor to your record then you’ll need to email your list of planned classes for completing the minor, along with the semester in which you plan to take the courses, to the chemical engineering advisor. We require this to ensure that you’ll be able to complete the minor in the time frame that you need. Then you will need to request the addition of the minor from your MyMichiganTech webpage. Directions for how to do this are on the minor page of the Registrar’s Office, Degree Services webpage.

When planning your minor courses, make sure you have a listing of the most current requirements for the minor. You can get this on the Registrar’s Office, Degree Services webpage. The listing of requirements that you are looking for is called the “minor audit”.

You will need to plan ahead because many of the minor classes have prerequisites that you need to complete first. The prerequisites can be found in the course descriptions or on the minor audit. Course descriptions are in Michigan Tech’s Undergraduate Catalog

Finally, once you’ve figured out the classes that you’ll be taking to complete the minor, you should meet with your major advisor to determine if any (or all!) of the classes for your minor can also be counted towards your major requirements. 

Here is some additional information that may help you with planning this minor. The typical schedule for when classes are offered is listed below, but this can change from year-to-year. The schedule of classes for the following academic year is published in February and so you’ll want to check it once it’s available.

For the required courses:

  • CM 2200 Intro to Minerals and Materials is usually offered every fall semester.
  • CM 3830 Mineral Processing and Extraction Lab is usually offered every spring semester.
  • GE 2300 Mineral Science is usually offered every fall semester. This course includes a lecture and laboratory.

For the thermodynamics courses, check with the department offering the course for the expected planned schedule.

For the elective courses:

  • CM 3825 Sampling, Statistics, and Instrumentation is usually offered every other spring during odd years, such as Spring ’23, Spring ’25, etc.
  • CM 4020 Undergrad Research in Mineral Processing Engineering is offered on demand. If you are interested in doing undergraduate research then you will need to talk to the faculty who are doing research in the mineral processing area to see if they have a project that you can work on with them. The faculty currently doing research in this area is Dr. Eisele and Dr. Pan.
  • CM 4505 Particle Technology is usually offered every other spring during even years, such as Spring ’22, Spring ’24, etc.
  • CM 4510 Interfacial Engineering is usually offered every other spring during odd years, such as Spring ’23, Spring ’25, etc.
  • CM/MSE 4740 Hydrometallurgy/Pyrometallurgy is usually offered every spring.
  • EC 4630 Mineral Industry Economics is usually offered every other spring semester and requires principles of economics as a prereq. However it hasn’t been offered recently and so you’ll need to check with the College of Business to see when it will be available next.
  • ENT XXXX Enterprise Project Work. If you are doing work in Enterprise that is in the mineral processing area then up to three credits of Enterprise may be approved to use towards the minor. Email a brief description of your project for each of the semesters that you wish to be considered for approval to the chemical engineering advisor.
  • GE 3400 Drilling and Blasting is usually offered every fall and requires additional prerequisites. However, if you have already completed both PH 2100 University Physics I and CM 2200 Intro to Minerals and Materials, then you might be able to get permission to enroll in the class. Contact the instructor of the course for consideration.
  • GE 4360 Bulk Material Dynamics and Engineering is usually offered every spring and requires additional prerequisites. However, if you are a chemical engineering student who has already completed both PH 2100 University Physics I and CM 3110 Transport & Unit Operations I, then you might be able to get permission to enroll in the class. Contact the instructor of the course for consideration.
  • MSE 2121 Materials Characterization I and MSE 2122 Materials Characterization I Lab are offered every spring and require additional prerequisites and so you’ll need to plan ahead.