Tag: chem

Department of Chemistry

New Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope Proposal

Schematic of the microscope interior with specimen chamber, gun, pump, and gas valve marked.

Basic ESEM gas pressure stages, by Gerry Danilatos.

The Department of Defense (DoD) announces the Fiscal Year 2023 Defense University Research Instrumentation Program (DURIP). I’m excited to share that the 2023 DURIP selections have been announced and our proposal for a new Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope is recommended for award. All indications are that it will be funded. Congratulations to Dr. Bruce Lee (PI), Dr. Paul Sanders, Dr. Trisha Sain, Dr. Kazuya Tajiri, and Dr. Stephen Techtmann. Once funded, the new instrument will be housed in ACMAL and available for use by the MTU research community.

The timing is still TBD but since the project should be completed within a year we are starting the planning process to finalize the equipment purchase. However, there is still an opportunity to add capabilities to the instrument, especially if cost share can be contributed. Some possible additions include: a windowless EDS detector for light element (including Li) analysis, tensile stage, cryo stage, etc.

Below is a summary of the capabilities of the proposed new SEM.

Summary of the Capabilities and Functions of the Proposed FE-ESEM

Instrument

  • Environmental or Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope

Electron Source

  • Field emission gun assembly with Schottky emitter source

Voltage

  • 20 V to 30,000 V

Resolution at 30 kV

  • High-vacuum Mode: 1.0 nm (SED) and 2.5 nm (BSED)
  • Low-vacuum Mode: 1.3 nm (SED) and 2.5 nm (BSED)
  • Environmental Mode: 1.3 nm (SED)

Magnification

  • 20x to 1,000,000x in a single quadrant

Ulti Max 170 EDS

  • Fast acquisition (quantitative > 400,000 cps and mapping > 1,000,000 cps)
  • Operate at low beam current, minimizing beam damage (3.5–5 kV)
  • High sensitivity for light element analysis

Symmetry S2 EBSD

  • High-speed analysis (indexing > 4,500 patterns per second)
  • High sensitivity >800 patterns per second/nA
  • Operates at low beam currents

Heating Stage

  • In-situ experimentation up to 1,100°C
  • Compatible with SE, BSED, EDS & EBSD detectors

Add Your Input

If you have any suggestions for capabilities or would like to discuss please contact Liz Miller by December 15th.

The Principal Investigator is Bruce Lee for research in additive manufacturing, materials development, and plastic waste recycling. The funding agency is the Office of Naval Research. DURIP is designed to improve the capabilities of accredited United States (U.S.) institutions of higher education to conduct research and to educate scientists and engineers in areas important to national defense, by providing funds for the acquisition of research equipment or instrumentation.

Who is Imaging Hemolysin X Treated Red Blood Cells at Michigan Tech?

Sequence of six images showing the disintegration of cell membranes.

The Laboratory of Mechanistic Glycobiology research group, led by Dr. Tarun Dam, is studying how the function of biomolecules from plant cells translates to human cells. Hemolysin X is a biomolecule that can disrupt and disintegrate cell membranes. The image above depicts how Hemolysin X systematically disintegrates a red blood cell.  The research group is looking into how this molecule reacts with other types of mammalian cells, including cancer cells.

Image taken by Jared Edwards, Chemistry PhD candidate, on ACMAL’s Hitachi S-4700 FE-SEM.

Learn more about the Laboratory of Mechanistic Glycobiology research group: Laboratory of Mechanistic Glycobiology

Visit the Applied Chemical and Morphological Analysis Laboratory’s webpage to learn more about our shared facility and instruments available to the Michigan Tech research community: ACMAL