Category Archives: Prospective Students

Stamp Sand Testing Continues for eCYBERMISSION Competition

Whiz KidsCALUMET — Members of the Whiz Kids and the Superior Remediators met Monday to complete the next step of their stamp sands experimentation, mixing cement with varying amounts of the gritty material left over from copper processing.

In June, the teams went to a competition in Washington, D.C. Afterward, they stayed a couple extra days, thanks to funding from the Lake Linden-Hubbell School Foundation, Lake Linden Lions Club and the American Legion Post 90 Auxiliary.

“The extra days were really important,” said Gretchen Hein, senior lecturer in the Department of Engineering Fundamentals at Michigan Technological University (MTU), who is advising the teams with help from MTU chemical engineering student Ryan Knoll.

Read more at the Mining Gazette, by Joshua Vissers.

A new use for Stamp Sand?

In recent months the Department of Natural Resources has made attempts at saving that fishing area from the drifting sand, but they have also asked for public input to offer solutions. Three kids have accepted that challenge and are currently testing their theories.

‘Their goal is to make concrete using stamp sand as part of the fine aggregate.’ Said, Gretchen Hein of Michigan Technological University.

Concrete is used worldwide for building just about anything and if the stamp sand can be used in the mix, there are plenty of things that can be made with it.

Read more at ABC 10 News, by Dane Wurmlinger.

Related:

Putting Stamp Sand to Good Use, and Then Some

Vote for the Whiz Kids tonight (Thurs. June 21) by 8:30 pm

Gretchen Hein Honored for Advising eCYBERMISSION National Winning Team


Gretchen Hein Honored for Advising eCYBERMISSION National Winning Team

Gretchen Hein
Gretchen Hein

Gretchen Hein (EF), was honored at the National Science Teachers Association National Conference for her advising of the 2017 eigth-grade eCYBERMISSION National Winning Team. eCYBERMISSION is a “is a web-based science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) competition for students in grades six through nine that promotes self-discovery and enables all students to recognize the real-life applications of STEM” according to their website. The Lake Linden-Hubbell High School team was comprised of Siona Beaudoin, Beau Hakala and Gabriel Poirier, along with guidance from Ryan Knoll, a student in Chemical Engineering. Hein is advising the ninth-grade eCYBERMISSION team and they have submitted their mission folder for review and evaluation.

Mission folder judging is based mainly on application of scientific inquiry using scientific practices or engineering design process. Other criteria include benefit to the community and team collaboration. First-place national award winners receive a $5,000 U.S. Series EE Savings Bond at maturity per student.

eCYBERMISSION Mission Folder for “Whiz Kids”

Extract from Community Benefit:

Stamp sand is an abundant material in our community. Due to the mining that took place in our community there are some areas of stamp sand along Lake Superior and on Torch Lake near our town. Though the Environmental Protection Agency has remediated some areas by spreading topsoil over the stamp sands and planting plants, there are some areas still with exposed stamp sand.

When learning about stamp sands and where they are located, we took a trip to the stamp sands in the town of Gay Michigan. We looked at the vegetation that was growing on the stamp sand. This relates to our experiment because we are trying to test which type of plant will grow in the least amount of topsoil. On this trip, we saw where plants were already growing in the sands, but we also noticed that there were a lot of barren areas. The regions where plants grew where water pooled or flowed into the area bringing not only water, but nutrients too.

Our school participates in the Lake Superior Stewardship Initiative (LSSI). This program “brings together schools and community partners to prepare K-12 students to become knowledgeable citizens concerned about the Lake Superior watershed and actively engaged in stewardship projects in their community.” (LSSI) Students in different science classes at our school sample water and soil as part of the Torch Lake Remediation Monitoring program.

Read more about the Whiz Kids’ scientific inquiry at eCYBERMISSION.

Eighth Grade Team Whiz Kids
Eighth Grade Team Whiz Kids

First-Year Engineering Students to Experience Flipped Classroom

First Year Engineering

The College of Engineering’s First-Year Engineering Program, provided through the Department of Engineering Fundamentals, is moving to a new model of instruction called a “flipped classroom.” The flipped classroom is grounded on the idea that students will prepare for class by doing readings and using other resources before class time. Once in class, students will work to solve problems, discuss applications of engineering and participate in engineering projects. To facilitate this model, each student must have a laptop of his or her own to prepare before class and to participate fully in class.

Incoming students for fall 2017 can review the laptop requirements through Undergraduate Admissions in preparation for this initiative.

Original story by Wayne Pennington, College of Engineering and Jon Sticklen, Engineering Fundamentals.


First-Year Engineering Courses (what do I take next)

The courses in which you enroll during your first 2-3 semesters at Michigan Tech will depend largely upon your initial math placement, and somewhat upon your intended major. For course descriptions, go to the Michigan Tech undergraduate course descriptions.

If you start out in Calculus I (MA1160) or higher,$ your approximate schedule for your first two semesters will be (see your academic advisor for any changes):

Fall 1 (15-17 credits) Spring 1 (15-17 credits)
MA1160 or higher$ – Calculus I (4-5) *
ENG1101 – Engineering Analysis & Problem Solving (3)*
PH1100 – Physics Lab (1)*
CH1150 – Chemistry I (3)**
CH1151 – Chemistry I Lab (1)
UN1015 – Composition (3) (English)
MA2160 or higher$ – Calculus II (4)
ENG1102 – Engineering Modeling & Design (3)
PH2100 – Physics I (3)
Major Specific Elective (1-4)
UN1025 – Global Issues (3) (Social Studies)

* Learning community scheduled: Groups of 20-24 students are scheduled in the indicated classes.
** Chemistry readiness guidelines
$ Typical Math sequence: MA1160 or MA1161, MA2160, MA3160, (MA2321 and MA3521) or (MA2320, MA3520). NOTE: Electrical Engineering students typically take MA2320/1 and MA3520/1 before MA3160. Computer Engineering degree does not require MA3160.

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First-Year Courses (what do I take next)

The courses in which you enroll during your first 2-3 semesters at Michigan Tech will depend largely upon your initial math placement, and somewhat upon your intended major. For course descriptions, go to the Michigan Tech undergraduate course descriptions.

If you start out in Calculus I (MA1160) or higher,$ your approximate schedule for your first two semesters will be (see your academic advisor for any changes):

Fall 1 (15-17 credits) Spring 1 (15-17 credits)
MA1160 or higher$ – Calculus I (4-5) *
ENG1101 – Engineering Analysis & Problem Solving (3)*
PH1100 – Physics Lab (1)*
CH1150 – Chemistry I (3)**
CH1151 – Chemistry I Lab (1)
UN1015 – Composition (3) (English)
MA2160 or higher$ – Calculus II (4)
ENG1102 – Engineering Modeling & Design (3)
PH2100 – Physics I (3)
Major Specific Elective (1-4)
UN1025 – Global Issues (3) (Social Studies)

* Learning community scheduled: Groups of 20-24 students are scheduled in the indicated classes.
** Chemistry readiness guidelines
$ Typical Math sequence: MA1160 or MA1161, MA2160, MA3160, (MA2321 and MA3521) or (MA2320, MA3520). NOTE: Electrical Engineering students typically take MA2320/1 and MA3520/1 before MA3160. Computer Engineering degree does not require MA3160.

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What engineering degree programs are offered at Michigan Tech

The College of Engineering at Michigan Tech offers the following degrees: