Category: Succeeding in Graduate School

Articles about professional development and seminar announcements.

Fall Career Fair Features New Companies and Veteran Recruiter

With 264 companies registered for the Fall Career Fair on Tuesday, Sept. 24, recruiters are running the gamut from new to renewed to never-miss-a-fair.

Among the new companies, according to Jim Turnquist, director of Career Services, is Chevron. Although they have recruited and hired on their own on campus, this year they’ve joined the job fair and expanded their search.

“In the past, they focused on geology, but this year they are looking for many different engineering fields: chemical, civil, electrical, environmental, mechanical,” Turnquist says. “That’s a big plus.”

Back after a hiatus from recruiting is Procter and Gamble. They are scouting for chemical, electrical and mechanical engineers, Turnquist says. “This is fantastic.”

A new company to the fair is Tata Motors, India’s largest auto manufacturer. “They have an IT branch, called Consultancy Services, which is also huge,” he says.

Old favorites like Dow Chemical have increased their presence. Instead of a couple of interview rooms, they’ve reserved eight for the day after the fair.

The Career Fair has grown into a week-plus of activities, Turnquist says, in both the fall and spring semesters. Interview skills training and resume blitzes have already started, and fair week has numerous events:

* Chrysler and GM both had ride and drive events. Chrysler’s Sunday Copper Harbor trips were all full. GM’s events were split between faculty and staff (Sunday) and students (Monday, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.) leaving from the pay lot, next to the Administration and Student Services building. More information is available at career@mtu.edu.

* The Society of Women Engineers hosts Evening with Industry, where recruiters can meet with students before the fair. It will be held tonight at 5:15 p.m. in the MUB Ballroom.

* The University Department Information Fair (Meet the Faculty) is held from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Tuesday at the fair. Academic and administrative departments can meet with company representatives.

* Center for Diversity and Inclusion Corporate Reception–Corporations can meet with students from organizations such as the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE), Out in Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics (oSTEM), American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES), and more. The event is scheduled for 6 to 7:45 p.m. at the Hamar House Tuesday night.

* Railroad Information Night, Tuesday, 7 to 9 p.m., DHH Ballroom–The Railroad Engineering and Activity Club and Tech’s Rail Transportation Program bring together students and railroad industry representatives.

“Also, on Monday night, there will be more than forty company information sessions,” Turnquist adds. “And these companies are looking for people. They are looking to hire.”

Published in Tech Today by Dennis Walikainen, senior editor


A Night at the Museum Features Geology PhD Student

The Carnegie Museum, in downtown Houghton, will host its third annual “Night at the Museum” fundraiser this Saturday, Sept. 21, from 4 to 8 p.m.  Tickets are $25 each and include a guided Red Jacket Trolley Tour, gourmet refreshments, music performed by local Suzuki students, and a silent auction.

This year’s guided Red Jacket Trolley tour will be of the ruins of Houghton’s Isle Royale Mine. Led by Erika Vye, geology PhD student and Wil Shapton of the Red Jacket Trolley company, the tour reflects our current exhibit theme “Gone But Not Forgotten: Preserving Memories of the Copper Country.”  The tour will illuminate how mining influenced our city’s landscape and how the remnants of the mining days live on amongst us.

Tickets are available at the museum (open Tuesday through Friday, noon to 5 p.m., and Saturday noon to 4 p.m.) Trolley seating is limited so be sure to choose your tour time, (4, 5, or 6 p.m.) when purchasing your ticket. Tickets sold at the door are not guaranteed a trolley tour.  All proceeds from the event will support building restoration and improvements, website development, exhibits and programs.

For more information, email history@cityofhoughton.com or call 482-7140.

Published in Tech Today


Women Launch a Publication About Gender Issues

Two humanities students at Michigan Tech have launched a newspaper called Beyond the Glass Ceiling. They hope it will become an outlet for writers who want to explore gender issues and gender inequality on campus.

“We had a lot of people interested, but most of them wanted to write anonymously. They thought it was too much of a risk.”

Megan Walsh, one of the student editors of Beyond the Glass Ceiling, talks about attempts to establish a base of writers last year as the publication was being launched. If you wonder why we need a feminist publication on campus, for Walsh, the request for anonymity answers it.

“That alone tells me we need to do this.”

Beyond the Glass Ceiling is the successor to the former TechnoBabe Times, a publication largely housed in the humanities department a decade ago. Graduate student Katie Snyder wanted to revive the tradition, with encouragement from faculty, leading to the new publication.

For the full story about the new publication, see online

Published in Tech Today by Kevin Hodur, creative writer


NASA Space Tech Research Fellowships – Fall 2014

NASA is seeking applications from U.S. graduate students for the agency’s Space Technology Research Fellowships.

Eligibility:

  • US citizens or legal permanent residents.
  • Graduate students pursuing advanced degrees in STEM disciplines.
  • Undergraduates planning to enroll in graduate school by the start of this fellowship

The fellowship begins at the start of the Fall 2014 semester.

The application deadline is November 13, 2013.  Click here for the application submission instructions.

The maximum award is $68K per year.

For more information on the fellowship:
https://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId=%7BBD3F49F4-611F-D9EC-1B84-16F4D7551609%7D&path=open


Peace Corps MS Student Tackles Water, Waste, Volcanoes, Earthquakes in Panama

To the people of Peña Blanca, Panama, Chet Hopp must seem like a godsend. He’s helping them get cleaner water, improve sanitation and understand their local volcanic hazards.

“I’m an environmental health extensionist, which means that my main responsibilities to my community of Peña Blanca deal with sanitation,” says Hopp, a Peace Corps Master’s International student in geology at Michigan Tech. “Specifically, we work to improve access to potable water through development and construction of gravity-fed aqueducts, as well as improving sanitation practices through education and access to various types of latrines.”

From the beginning, Hopp says, the priority has been latrines, although the water system does concern many in the community. He gives talks on sanitation practices, as well as how to properly construct and maintain the latrines they are building.

And, there’s buy-in, literally, from the locals.

“Each participating family is required to make a $5 deposit, to be returned upon successful completion, and they must pay for half the cost of corrugated metal roofing,” Hopp says. “There are other roofing options, though, so they can opt out of this.”

Read the full story.

Published in Tech Today by Dennis Walikainen, senior editor


Lactation Room Locations

Michigan Tech has adopted the recommendation that the University provide lactation rooms throughout campus for faculty, students, staff and visitors. This list has been updated to include the Center for Diversity and Inclusion (CDI).

Campus lactation room locations are:

  • Administration Building, 1st Floor
  • Electrical Energy Resources Center (EERC), 1st Floor
  • Great Lakes Research Center (GLRC), 1st Floor
  • Lake Shore Center, 3rd Floor
  • Citizen’s Bank, Ground Floor near lunch room
  • Center for Diversity and Inclusion (CDI), 2nd Floor

At the end of the summer, two additional rooms will be open in the Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics building (MEEM), 4th Floor and the Student Development Center (SDC), 1st Floor.

Please contact Chris Anderson, 7-2474 or Jim Heikkinen, 7-2305 for questions.


Are You Cited? Find Out With Library’s New Citation Searching Guide

The Van Pelt and Opie Library is pleased to offer a new guide to citation searching, which can be found online. This guide, created specifically for faculty and graduate students at Michigan Tech, contains helpful information for researchers in all academic disciplines.

Save yourself hours of searching time by using the guide to learn how to:

  • Determine if and where your publications have been cited
  • Discover works related to other authors, articles, or topics
  • Assess the relative quality or merit of a publication

If you have a suggestion for a database or other resource that should be added to the guide, please send an e-mail to reflib@mtu.edu or submit your suggestion using the link on the front page of the guide.


Zinc: The Perfect Material for Stents?

Patrick Bowen, PhD in Materials Science and Engineering
Stents can be lifesavers, holding open coronary arteries to allow a healthy supply of blood to flow to the heart. But they can also cause problems, because they stay in the body for a lifetime.

Researchers have been trying to solve the problem by designing a stent that will hold an artery open and then dissolve harmlessly after the blood vessel heals. Traditional metals have not had the right properties, however.

Now a team of scientists at Michigan Tech is experimenting with a novel material that may lead to a new generation of bioabsorbable stents: zinc.

For the full story, click here.

Published in Tech Today by Marcia Goodrich, magazine editor


Jim Hwang, Zhiwei Peng Selected for Bhakta Rath Research Award

Materials science and engineering professor Jiann-Yang “Jim” Hwang and 2012 PhD graduate Zhiwei Peng have been chosen to receive Michigan Technological University’s 2013 Bhakta Rath Research Award for their studies on the use of microwaves in steelmaking.

The award, endowed by Michigan Tech alumnus Bhakta Rath and his wife, Shushama, recognizes a doctoral student at Michigan Tech and his/her faculty advisor for “exceptional research of particular value that anticipates the future needs of the nation while supporting advances in emerging technology.” Hwang and Peng, now a research assistant professor, will share a $2,000 prize.

Peng and Hwang were nominated by Stephen Kampe, the St. John Professor and chair of the materials science and engineering department.

Kampe called Peng’s work “incredibly thorough in scope and rigorous in its approach.” He noted that Hwang has researched microwave steelmaking for years “and has become a renowned authority on environmental and sustainability issues within the materials processing industries.

“This project represents an excellent fit with Dr. Rath’s vision of this award,” Kampe said.

The researcher did theoretical and experimental work on the use of microwaves to heat materials, particularly magnetic substances, and offered ways to improve microwaves’ heating efficiency. They also provided guidelines for making large-scale microwave furnaces for industrial use. Peng’s dissertation research was an integral part of three grants totaling $2.6 million.

Their work has led to five books, 25 papers and invitations to prepare books on microwave heating.

In support of the nomination, Dinesh Agrawal of Penn State wrote that Peng’s work “will surely accelerate the development of microwave heating for various applications in the field of ceramic and metallic materials, organics synthesis, biomedical treatments, etc.” And Jian Li of Canada’s CanmetMATERIALS research laboratory wrote that Peng’s dissertation reveals “great potential in energy saving and environmental safety.”

Mingming Zhang of the Canadian steel and mining company ArcelorMittal wrote that Peng’s research “attracted my attention because of its huge potential in energy savings and environmental protection compared with conventional technologies,” adding that the achievement is all the more remarkable because steelmaking consumes more energy than any other industry. “Moreover, there is a great possibility to substantially reduce the CO2, SOx and NOx emissions, contributing to an environmentally friendly world,” Zhang said.

Peng’s solid foundation in math and science and his interdisciplinary approach have been key to the project’s success, said his advisor. “He is not afraid of challenges, and he willingly took courses from other departments that advanced his research,” Hwang said. “By combining knowledge from several disciplines, Zhiwei has developed a new field of research.”

Published in Tech Today by Marcia Goodrich, magazine editor