Category Archives: Research

Unscripted Geoheritage: More than a Boulder

Geoheritage BoulderThe rocks of the Keweenaw Peninsula are ancient and full of history. Most are more than one billion years old and hold one of the world’s few native copper deposits. In their guest blog, part of a series on local geoheritage, Erika Vye and Bill Rose explain the importance of a single Copper Country boulder.

The North Houghton County Sewage Authority hit a boulder during work south of Calumet. The boulder is large—nearly seven feet across—but that’s not what makes it unusual. The rock type is a rare sight at the surface and is chock full of copper. The rock is part of the Calumet and Hecla Conglomerate, a formation considered the mother lode of the Keweenaw Peninsula, and represents an important part of the region’s history.

Read more at Unscripted: Science and Research by Bill Rose and Erika Vye.

EPA Taps Tech as Home of Regional Environmental Infrastructure Center

The EPA named Michigan Tech the new home of its Region 5 environmental finance center, a recognition that comes with a six-year grant of up to $5.6 million.  EPA Region 5 covers Michigan, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio.

An EPA team will be at Tech to conduct a site visit on Sept. 13-14, 2016.

Engineering, Business Resources

“The depth of engineering resources that we have, our business school’s involvement and the fact that a multidisciplinary approach is the norm here all made our application stand out,” says Tim Colling. The principal investigator on the EPA center, Colling also directs Tech’s Center for Technology and Training (CTT), part of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE). There are several co-PIs from various University departments, centers and institutes, including CEE, the Sustainable Futures Institute, Michigan Tech Transportation Institute (MTTI) and the School of Business and Economics.

Read more at Michigan Tech News, by Jennifer Donovan.

Unscripted Geoheritage: Stamping Through History

Stamp SandsThe rocks of the Keweenaw Peninsula are ancient: More than one billion years old, containing loads of native copper deposits. Mining them created a legacy seen throughout the region.

The nation’s first big mining boom certainly left its mark on the peninsula. It left icons like the Quincy Mine Hoist; it left massive deposits of mine waste, a fine material called stamp sands, outside Gay; it left a few problems, like a Superfund site in and around Torch Lake. As rich as the copper that people once mined here, the history of the Keweenaw is full of stories, insight, dilemmas, and opportunities. Call it geoheritage.

As part of ongoing geoheritage education, the annual Geotours are an effort to bring the earth processes and cultural legacy of the land to light. The program is run by Bill Rose, a professor emeritus of geology at Michigan Tech, and Erika Vye, a recent PhD graduate of the geology program. On Thursday, July 28, they took a boatload of people to the eastern side of the peninsula for an up-close and personal view of the Keweenaw’s industrial mining legacy.

Read more at Unscripted: Science and Research, by Allison Mills.

NOAA Partnering with Michigan Tech for Lake Superior Research

Andrew Barnard
Andrew Barnard

WJMN TV-UP Matters (CBS) and WLUC TV6 (NBC) broadcast stories on Michigan Tech’s Great Lakes research on a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) vessel.

From Tech Today.

Michigan Tech pairs with NOAA for Lake Superior research

Andrew Barnard, an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering at MTU, said, “As a mechanical engineer, I’m interested in making loud things quieter and one of the things we’re looking at making quieter is research vessels that specifically deal with fish or marine mammal wildlife so that they can affect the environment less when they’re going to do their work.”

Read more and watch the video at WJMN TV-UP Matters.

NOAA to work with MTU scientists out on Lake Superior

“Today, we’re laying some hydrophones which are under water microphones under the water and we’re doing some boat bypasses to baseline the sound coming from our research vessels and from the NOAA 5501,” said MTU Mechanical Engineer, Dr. Andrew Barnard.

Read more and watch the video at WLUC TV6, by Aleah Hordges.

Presentations by NSF-funded Teachers Mentored by Engineering Grad Students

NSFSix Michigan teachers mentored by Michigan Tech grad students during a 6-week Summer Institute on Computational Tools and the Environment will present their research in a poster session from 1 to 3 p.m. tomorrow (Aug. 18) in the atrium of the Great Lakes Research Center.

The institute was sponsored by the National Science Foundation’s Research Experiences for Teachers program.

The poster session is the culmination of a six-week, intensive Summer Institute on Computational Tools and the Environment, sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF).

The teachers were mentored by environmental engineering, chemical engineering, geological engineering and forestry graduate students as they conducted research on water quality, forestry management and life cycle assessment.

The graduate students also worked with the teachers to translate the results of their research into curriculum materials to be used in the teachers’ science and mathematics classes.

For more information, contact Alex Mayer, asmayer@mtu.edu.

From Tech Today, by Jenn Donovan.

Science360: To Purify a Virus

Science360

NSF CAREER award winner Caryn Heldt studies technologies used to remove viruses as well as cleaning up vaccines. A Michigan Tech Unscripted story animation on the role of osmolytes in cells is featured in Science360. The Unscripted article, To Purify a Virus, features an interview with Heldt by story author Allison Mills and a captured live Twitter chat via Storify.

Learn more about Heldt’s research in Caryn Heldt Receives CAREER Award for Her Virus Removal Work, Michigan Tech News, by Allison Mills.

Adrienne Minerick is the Assistant to the Provost for Faculty Development

New Model Designed to Promote Collaboration and Communications

In recognition of the University-wide efforts that some of our academic administrators are undertaking, the Vice Presidents for Academic Affairs and Research are testing out a new model intended to promote improved collaboration and communication on campus.

For the 2016-17 academic year, Jason Carter (KIP) will continue to serve as Chair of the Department of Kinesiology and Integrative Physiology while also serving as assistant to the Vice President for Research for Research Development.

In addition, Adrienne Minerick will continue in her position as Associate Dean for Research and Innovation in the College of Engineering and will also serve as Assistant to the Provost for Faculty Development.

Read more at Tech Today, by Offices of Vice Presidents for Academic Affairs and Research.

Adrienne Minerick
Adrienne Minerick