Category Archives: Research

Michigan Tech Joins Nanovation Partners in a Commercialization Agreement on Nanotube Processes

Michigan Tech and NanovationIntellectual property from UCSD, WSU, UCF, Michigan Tech, N2 Biomedical, and Nanovation Partners represents the most comprehensive portfolio available to license with respect to implant nanotube surface treatment.

Nanovation Partners, LLC and Michigan Technological University today announced a partnership agreement for commercialization of processes to nano-texturize medical implants. These advanced processes can simultaneously increase bone ingrowth and provide an antimicrobial barrier. The collaboration agreement extends Nanovation Partner’s leadership in commercialization of nano-texturing technology.

Craig Friedrich, PhD, Director of Michigan Tech’s Multi-scale Technologies Institute, commented, “What we’re developing is a surface treatment that’s more straightforward and economical than other processes. It speeds healing and is applicable to a broad range of implants. With this process, in conjunction with the technologies developed at other leading nano-technology universities and companies already in partnership with Nanovation Partners, we can fight infection and reduce inflammation. Our partnership with Nanovation Partners will speed and broaden the transfer of this technology to provide a clinical benefit for a broad range of patients.”

The partnership with Michigan Tech builds on Nanovation Partners’ strategic collaborations with leaders in nanotexturing technology,” —Dan Justin, President and CEO of Nanovation Partners.

Read more at PRWeb, by Dan Justin, Nanovation Partners.

Meeting for the Center for Novel High Voltage/Temperature Material and Structures

GLRCME-EM to Host Advisory Board Meeting

NSF I/UCRC Industrial Advisory Board Meeting for the Center for Novel High Voltage/Temperature Material and Structures begins today.

Today and tomorrow, ME-EM is hosting the semi-annual NSF I/UCRC Industrial Advisory Board meeting for the Center for Novel High Voltage/Temperature Materials and Structures (HVT) at the Great Lakes Research Center. The meeting is organized by Site Director Greg Odegard (ME-EM) and Co-Directors Julie King (CHE) and Paul Sanders (MSE).

Expected at the meeting are 40 faculty, graduate students and Industrial Advisory Board members from Michigan Tech’s ME-EM, Chem Eng and MSE departments; University of Denver, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champagne; Bonneville Power Administration, CTC Global, General Cable, Lockheed Martin Space Systems and Tri-State Generation and Transmission.

The mission of the HVT Center is to develop and evaluate new materials and structures for a range of HVT technological applications, particularly for the power transmission and aerospace industries.

The HVT Center has entered its third year of operation; this meeting is focused on the review of the current projects, proposals for future research and discussions on directions for Center growth. The Center is jointly funded by NSF and the Industrial Advisory Board member companies.


Unscripted—Be Aware: Cybersecurity

CybersecurityCybersecurity in cars made several headlines last summer. Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek’s carhacking research made for a viral WIRED article when they remotely took over a Jeep Cherokee on the highway; Bloomberg Business covered these vulnerabilities in a video interview at the Def Con hacking convention. At Michigan Tech, cybersecurity is an integral part of many researchers’ work. Steven Goldsmith, a research professor in mechanical engineering, started a new graduate course on automotive cybersecurity this fall and spoke with me about his work.

Read more at Unscripted: Science and Engineering Research, by Allison Mills.

Ebrahim K. Tarshizi Receives Outstanding Young Scientist Award

Ebrahim Tarshizi
Ebrahim Tarshizi

Ebrahim K. Tarshizi (GMES), has been selected as the 2016 recipient of the Industrial Minerals and Aggregates Division Outstanding Young Scientist Award by the Society for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration (SME).

“I’m truly honored and very grateful to receive such a prestigious award and recognition by SME. I would like to thank the IM&AD award committee, nominator(s), my colleagues and mentors,” Tarshizi stated.

SME administers and presents numerous recognition awards for outstanding individual and group achievements in the mining and minerals industry every year. These awards and their recipients represent the highest levels of commitment and expertise that have come to symbolize the vitality of SME as a professional society.

The Young Scientist Award, established by the Industrial Minerals & Aggregates Division in 1985, brings recognition of scientific professionalism to young people working in the industrial minerals & aggregates industry.

The award consists of a plaque, a stipend of $250 to help defray expenses while attending the Annual Meeting at which the award is presented, and paid housing, registration(s) and ticket(s) for the recipient and his/her spouse at the SME Annual Conference & Expo and the IM&AD Luncheon.

This award will be presented to Dr. Tarshizi at the SME 2017 Annual Conference & Expo and CMA 119th National Western Mining Conference in Denver, Colorado, at the Industrial Minerals and Aggregates Division Luncheon on Tuesday, Feb. 21.

By Geological and Mining Engineering and Sciences.

Unscripted Geoheritage: More than a Boulder

Geoheritage BoulderThe rocks of the Keweenaw Peninsula are ancient and full of history. Most are more than one billion years old and hold one of the world’s few native copper deposits. In their guest blog, part of a series on local geoheritage, Erika Vye and Bill Rose explain the importance of a single Copper Country boulder.

The North Houghton County Sewage Authority hit a boulder during work south of Calumet. The boulder is large—nearly seven feet across—but that’s not what makes it unusual. The rock type is a rare sight at the surface and is chock full of copper. The rock is part of the Calumet and Hecla Conglomerate, a formation considered the mother lode of the Keweenaw Peninsula, and represents an important part of the region’s history.

Read more at Unscripted: Science and Research by Bill Rose and Erika Vye.

EPA Taps Tech as Home of Regional Environmental Infrastructure Center

The EPA named Michigan Tech the new home of its Region 5 environmental finance center, a recognition that comes with a six-year grant of up to $5.6 million.  EPA Region 5 covers Michigan, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio.

An EPA team will be at Tech to conduct a site visit on Sept. 13-14, 2016.

Engineering, Business Resources

“The depth of engineering resources that we have, our business school’s involvement and the fact that a multidisciplinary approach is the norm here all made our application stand out,” says Tim Colling. The principal investigator on the EPA center, Colling also directs Tech’s Center for Technology and Training (CTT), part of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE). There are several co-PIs from various University departments, centers and institutes, including CEE, the Sustainable Futures Institute, Michigan Tech Transportation Institute (MTTI) and the School of Business and Economics.

Read more at Michigan Tech News, by Jennifer Donovan.

Unscripted Geoheritage: Stamping Through History

Stamp SandsThe rocks of the Keweenaw Peninsula are ancient: More than one billion years old, containing loads of native copper deposits. Mining them created a legacy seen throughout the region.

The nation’s first big mining boom certainly left its mark on the peninsula. It left icons like the Quincy Mine Hoist; it left massive deposits of mine waste, a fine material called stamp sands, outside Gay; it left a few problems, like a Superfund site in and around Torch Lake. As rich as the copper that people once mined here, the history of the Keweenaw is full of stories, insight, dilemmas, and opportunities. Call it geoheritage.

As part of ongoing geoheritage education, the annual Geotours are an effort to bring the earth processes and cultural legacy of the land to light. The program is run by Bill Rose, a professor emeritus of geology at Michigan Tech, and Erika Vye, a recent PhD graduate of the geology program. On Thursday, July 28, they took a boatload of people to the eastern side of the peninsula for an up-close and personal view of the Keweenaw’s industrial mining legacy.

Read more at Unscripted: Science and Research, by Allison Mills.

NOAA Partnering with Michigan Tech for Lake Superior Research

Andrew Barnard
Andrew Barnard

WJMN TV-UP Matters (CBS) and WLUC TV6 (NBC) broadcast stories on Michigan Tech’s Great Lakes research on a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) vessel.

From Tech Today.

Michigan Tech pairs with NOAA for Lake Superior research

Andrew Barnard, an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering at MTU, said, “As a mechanical engineer, I’m interested in making loud things quieter and one of the things we’re looking at making quieter is research vessels that specifically deal with fish or marine mammal wildlife so that they can affect the environment less when they’re going to do their work.”

Read more and watch the video at WJMN TV-UP Matters.

NOAA to work with MTU scientists out on Lake Superior

“Today, we’re laying some hydrophones which are under water microphones under the water and we’re doing some boat bypasses to baseline the sound coming from our research vessels and from the NOAA 5501,” said MTU Mechanical Engineer, Dr. Andrew Barnard.

Read more and watch the video at WLUC TV6, by Aleah Hordges.