Day: July 5, 2019

Welcome to Summer Intern Gabrielle Wood

Summer Intern Gabrielle Wood
Our new FMTL Archives Intern for summer 2019, Gabrielle Wood

On behalf of the Michigan Technological University Archives and Copper Country Historical Collections, in partnership with the Friends of the Michigan Tech Library, we hope you will help us welcome our new Archives Intern for summer 2019. Gabrielle Wood was selected as the Friends of the Michigan Tech Library Archives Intern after a competitive national call for applicants. While in Houghton, Gabby will be assisting with research support services and collections processing in the Michigan Tech Archives. We are very excited to have her on board! Below, please take a moment to get to know her as she introduces herself in her own words.


Hello!

My name is Gabrielle (or Gabby for short) and I am excited to be this summer’s Friends of the Michigan Tech Library Archives Intern. I come to Michigan Tech from Southern California and am looking forward to taking in all the natural splendor of the Upper Peninsula- and hopefully not getting bitten by too many bugs along the way. I received a bachelor’s degree in history from the University of California, Irvine and am currently working towards a master’s degree in library and information studies with a specialization in archiving at UCLA.

Probably reflecting my background in history, one of my favorite things about archives/the archiving field is being able to help people interact directly with the past- I think history goes from black and white to vivid color when you see or hold an original document in your hands and think about the life it has had and who has held it before you. This summer at Michigan Tech I look forward to gaining more hands on experience, learning more about the local area, and helping patrons with their research needs!

3 Fun Fact about me:

  • I am originally from the Boston area, specifically a small town that is located right next to Quincy, Massachusetts – so while not yet familiar with the local area, some of the local names have been very familiar to me
  • I love to bake, if given a superlative mine would probably read: “most likely to be found in a kitchen at 10 pm on a Tuesday night making cookies just because”
  • The Space Race (late 1940s to 1960s) is one of my favorite historical periods to study

Feel free to come by to see the collections and me this summer!


For more information on the Friends of the Michigan Tech Library Internship Program or to set up a time to say hello to our new intern, please call our University Archivist, Lindsay Hiltunen at (906) 487-2505 or e-mail us at copper@mtu.edu. The Michigan Tech Archives can also be found on Twitter: @mtuarchives, Instagram: michigantecharchives, and Facebook.


Flashback Friday: The Bridge Over Fanny Hooe Creek

Bridge Over Fanny Hooe Creek
A photograph of the bridge over Fanny Hooe Creek taken on July 5, 1930.

As we continue into the long holiday weekend, it is our sincere hope that you have time to get out and enjoy the great outdoors and do some exploring in the beautiful Copper Country. Our Flashback Friday shares a historic image of a site you just might see if you are taking in some hiking near Copper Harbor.

This photograph is of the bridge over Fanny Hooe Creek, which is about a mile east of Copper Harbor, right next to Fort Wilkins State Park. The photograph was taken on this day in 1930 and is part of the Reeder Photograph Collection.

US-41 Fanny Hooe Creek Bridge
A fall scene of the bridge in October 2012. Courtesy of Historic Bridges.

The bridge has an interesting history, starting with the passage of the State Trunk Line Act in 1913. The Act allowed for the construction of a state route through Keweenaw, Houghton, Ontonagon,  and Gogebic counties. Sections of this route eventually became part of US 41 and US 45. In the 1920s, new bridges were included in the trunkline to improve accessibility and expand the route. The small concrete arch bridge was constructed by the Keweenaw County Road Commission. The bridge is quite beautiful to behold, with an elliptical arch ring, filled spandrels, and decorative fieldstone work. Of special highlight is the decorative stonework, which was uncommon for many Michigan bridges of the era.

Perhaps if you took in the fireworks in Copper Harbor last night or are looking to head north this weekend, be sure to check out this small but mighty Michigan marvel!