What are Katie’s current office hours?

If you are looking for advising handouts, these are available on the Advising Handouts webpage.

If you are having registration problems, go to the Registrar’s Office located in the Wahtera Center in the Admin building.

Also check out our FAQ’s on the right hand side of the page for answers to many common questions.

Week 3 through Week 8:

Week 3 through Week 8, I will be available for one-on-one meetings by appointment.   This is the best time to get assistance with long term course planning.  If you need to meet with me, please view my Google calendar and invite me to a meeting with you during an open time on my calendar.  Don’t know how to do this? Go to: How do I make an appointment with a chemical engineering advisor?  A half hour meeting is usually sufficient to get most questions answered.

Early Registration (Week 9):

Day Date Walk-in Hours
Monday 3/16 By Appointment
Tuesday 3/17 By Appointment
Wednesday 3/18 By Appointment
Thursday 3/19 1pm-3pm
Friday 3/20 9:30am-12:30pm

First Week of Registration (Week 10):

Day Date Walk-in Hours
Monday 3/23 9:30am-11am
Tuesday 3/24 9:30am-12:30pm
Wednesday 3/25 1pm-3pm
Thursday 3/26 1pm-3pm
Friday 3/27 9:30am-noon

Second Week of Registration (Week 11):

Day Date Walk-in Hours
Monday 3/30 1pm-3pm
Tuesday 3/31 9:30am-12:30pm
Wednesday 4/1 1pm-3pm
Thursday 4/2 Not available
Friday 4/3 Not available

Week 12 through the end of the semester:

I will resume regular office hours during the twelfth week of classes and will be available for one-on-one meetings by appointment.  If you need to meet with me, please view my Google calendar and invite me to a meeting with you during an open time on my calendar.  Don’t know how to do this? Go to: How do I make an appointment with a chemical engineering advisor?  A half hour meeting is usually sufficient to get most questions answered.

Summer Advising:

The advising office is closed over the summer. My last day in the office will be Wednesday, May 6th. The advising office will reopen two weeks before fall classes start on Monday, August 17th. If you have an issue that needs immediate attention during the summer please call the Department Office at 906-487-3132.

What are the changes to GenEd for Fall 2015?

The Michigan Tech General Education program is changing as of Fall 2015.  All student starting or transferring to Tech as of Fall 2015 must follow the new General Education rules.  For chemical engineering students, this impacts mostly what courses count as HASS electives.  The program will soon be outlined on the Registrar’s General Education page; that’s the definitive page for determining the rules.  We do have an advanced copy of the rules/HASS list posted on the we that you can access at this link:  www.chem.mtu.edu/~fmorriso/curriculum/HASS2015RegistrarList.pdf.

Can I take graduate courses towards a graduate degree while still an undergrad?

Michigan Tech does allow this under Senior Rule (see the Registrar’s web page for up-to-date details).

As of 2015, these were the rules:

While finishing an undergraduate degree, students are allowed to take courses which could apply to a graduate degree. However, a course cannot be applied to both a graduate and an undergraduate degree.

A Senior Rule form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar’s Office by Wednesday of week 2 for the course semester. Upon submission, the student’s academic record will be changed to show graduate status for the course designated. Once the academic record has been changed to show graduate status for a particular course, it cannot be changed back to count toward an undergraduate degree.

Senior Rule Guidelines

  • A student so enrolled and carrying 6 credits or more in 5000 or 6000 level courses may carry no more than 16 credits of course work per semester.
  • The total number of Senior Rule credits may not exceed one-third of the required non-research course credits.
  • Courses taken under senior rule are not eligible for undergraduate Federal aid.
  • See Financial Aid enrollment requirements for additional requirements.

Note that the School of Business has set 6 credits as a maximum of Senior Rule credits that may be applied to the MBA (per Sonya Goltz, 2007).

 

What are the current rules for the Minerals Processing Minor?

As of Fall 2015, there will be new rules for the Minerals Processing Minor.  The requirements are shown at this link:

http://www.chem.mtu.edu/~fmorriso/advising/MineralsProcessingMinorCMMPChangesFall2014.pdf

These changes will be up on the Registrar’s website by 10th week of Spring 2015.  Students taking the minor should take GE 2301 for their mineralogy choice, which is open to CMMP students and allows for fewer prerequisites.

How can I arrange to take the CM Department Safety Exam?

All students enrolling in the Departmental research courses must pass the Chemical Engineering Department Safety Exam.  Any individual who is requesting a key to a laboratory in the Chemical Engineering Department must also pass the Safety Exam.

The first step is to study for the exam. The study materials for the safety exam are located at this link. The three items to study are listed under Manuals.

www.mtu.edu/chemical/facilities/safety/research/

When you are ready to take the test, please contact Mo Anton in the Department Office (Chem Sci 203, 487-3132, maanton@mtu.edu) to schedule a time to take the test. You must get an 80% to pass. You are allowed to retake the exam, if needed.

Volunteer Opportunity: Conversation Partners

Leading a well-rounded and meaningful life means helping others.  We highlight here some volunteer opportunities at Michigan Tech.

(see Tech Today newsletter 14Jan2015)

IESL Conversation Partner Opportunity

Conversation Partners  that pairs students in the Intensive English as a Second Language (IESL) program with more proficient English-speaking members of the Michigan Tech community. The program is open to students, faculty and staff. Participants commit to one-hour per week of one-on-one informal conversation by signing a contract with the IESL program for one semester. The contract commits them to meet their partner in public places on campus for a minimum of one hour per week.

Please consider giving an international student an hour of your time. It makes an enormous difference.

How the Program Works

  1. Interested students, faculty and staff members may download and complete the online form.
  2. IESL matches students with participants. The program makes every effort to match people of the same gender though sometimes this may be difficult. IESL will always check with volunteers before matching them with someone of the opposite gender.
  3. IESL introduces the conversation partners to each other at an initial meeting. Both parties sign a contract stating that they will meet on campus once per week for the duration of the semester.
  4. Though partners meet independently, listening and speaking teachers will often check in with students.
  5. If there are any concerns, we ask that volunteers please contact the IESL program as soon as possible.

Why participate in this opportunity?

As a member of the Tech community, there are many reasons why you should consider and commit to being conversation partner. Here are some of them:

  • Make a new friend and create a potentially rewarding friendship
  • Help an international student understand American culture and society
  • Experience the contemporary global landscape from the unique perspective of one of our international students
  • Develop deeper cultural awareness and understanding by developing a sustained conversation with someone from a different country
  • Participate in promoting rewarding cross-language relations and cross-cultural dialogue on campus

The Role of a Conversation Partner
As a partner your main responsibility is to offer your IESL student conversation practice. At times you may have to explain English language points but we are not asking you to be an English as a Second Language teacher. The goal is for your conversation partner to have plenty of speaking and listening practice.

The IESL program can provide ideas for your weekly meetings at the program’s preliminary meeting. Those who have participated have found the experience rewarding. We urge others to give it a try. For questions, contact IESL at iesl@mtu.edu.

What computer programs are used in the ChemE program at Michigan Tech?

We use a variety of computer programs in the Department of Chemical Engineering at Michigan Tech.  Microsoft Word is widely used for report preparation.  Dr. Morrison has a YouTube video showing some short-cuts for writing equations with Microsoft Word.  In the junior laboratory, CM3215 Fundamentals of ChemE Lab, we use Microsoft Excel extensively and we also use Visio for creating Piping and Instrumentation Diagrams (P&ID).

Microsoft Excel is introduced in the first-year engineering classes (ENG 1101 and and ENG 1102), and so it is assumed that Chemical Engineering juniors have some familiarity with Excel.  In CM3215 there are several exercises meant to gauge and build Excel proficiency.  We also ask students to learn how to use Excel’s LINEST program for determining least squares fits as well as uncertainty parameters related to least squares fits.  Error analysis is a big part of CM 3215, and in that and subsequent classes we add error bars to graphs (using Excel) to show uncertainty.  Excel also has a function called Solver that we use in several classes (CM 3215, CM 3450, CM4655 for example) to perform nonlinear curve fitting and optimization.

Here is a list of some of the software programs used in CM courses

  • CM2110 Fundamentals of Chem E 1: Polymath, Excel, Visio
  • CM2120 Fundamentals of Chem E 2: Excel, Word, and UniSim
  • CM3215 Fundamentals of ChemE Lab:  Excel, Word, Visio
  • CM3110 Transport 1:  Excel, Comsol, Word
  • CM3120 Transport 2: Excel, Word
  • CM3230 Thermodynamics:  Excel, Word, Mathcad
  • CM3310 Process Control: LabVIEW
  • CM3410 Tech Communication for Che:  Excel, Word, PowerPoint
  • CM3510: Chemical Reaction Engineering: Polymath, Word, UniSim
  • CM3450: Computer-Aided Problem Solving:  UniSim, MatLab, MathCAD, Excel w/ VBA, and Minitab
  • CM4110 Unit Operations Lab: Excel, Word, Visio, PowerPoint
  • CM4120 Plant Operations Lab:  Excel, Word, Visio, PowerPoint, PI DataLink, PI ProcessBook
  • CM4310 Process Safety/Environment:  Excel, Word, EPI Suite, SimaPro
  • CM4855 Plant Design 1:  Excel, Word, Visio, UniSim, SuperTarget
  • CM4860 Plant Design 2:  Excel, Word, Visio, UniSim, SuperTarget
  • CM4861 Plant Design Lab 2: Excel, Word, Visio, UniSim, SuperTarget

 

 

Can I take PH 2200 and CM 3110 at the same time?

We recommend that you complete all the first and second year courses, including PH 2200, before beginning your junior chemical engineering courses, especially CM 3110.

Although we recommend that you complete PH 2200 before taking CM 3110, you are permitted to take them at the same time or to defer PH 2200 to a later semester.    In Fall 2014, 44% of the students taking PH 2200 and CM 3110 at the same time failed CM 3110 or earned a D in CM 3110.  Note, also, that PH 2200 is a prerequisite for CM 3310 Process Controls, which is only offered in the spring semester.

If you are not following the standard sequence, please reflect on your capabilities and your academic strengths and weaknesses as  you plan your schedule.  You may wish to discuss your situation with your advisor.  If you are a strong student, you can succeed in CM 3110 even without having completed all your second-year physics.  Even strong students, however, will get more out of CM 3110 if they approach it with the full preparation of all the first and second year courses having been completed with a C or better.

What is the Degree Audit Reporting System (DARS)?

One of the frustrating things about registering is the uncertainty:  what classed do I need?  Does this class I’m looking at count as tech elective?  as gen ed?

One resource you have to sorting this out (besides seeing Katie) is the DARS tool in Banweb (Degree Audit Reporting System).  This tool checks your records (according to Michigan Tech) against the requirements for your degree.  If you’ve met the requirements, it goes GREEN.  If the requirements are not met, it stays RED.

I would like to suggest that everyone try it out.

To get to DARS you log onto your Banweb account and under Student in the middle column look for “Degree Audit”.  Click there and run the current year audit.  Sometimes you have to wait – look for the circle above to see if it’s thinking.  It always has to generate the report to get the most current version.

When the DARS opens, you will see some graphics and a long column of red or green “buckets” of courses or requirements.  They are:

1.  Two buckets that check your GPA for both the department and for overall.  Both must be over 2.0 for you to graduate.
2.  Major requirements:  This is all your core math, physics, chemistry, and chem eng courses.
3.  Chemistry option:  here whether you take Organic 1 or Hydro Pyro you chose a different audit path.  In this section you will see the technical electives and the various categories of the electives.  Take a close look to see what classes you may choose from in each category.
4.  Six gen ed buckets that check if you meet all the gen ed requirements.  It checks if you have the freshmen courses, the sophomore courses, the HASS, etc.  It checks that at least 6 credits of HASS are at the 3000 level.
5.  Co curricular bucket – your phys ed courses.

The DARS system is what actually checks you out for graduation.  If it says you graduate, you do.  We have worked long and hard with the programmers in the Admin Building to get this system to accurately check you out for graduation – please use the DARS tool to guide you as you plan for registration.

There are some things that the DARS system will not do right until Katie “touches” your audit and makes an adjustment.  If something you chose or transfered puts you into this situation, you do need to come see Katie.  She’ll be happy to look at DARS adjustments after registration is over.

Hope this eases your registration experience!